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Posted: 2/20/2006 2:25:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/26/2006 6:30:28 AM EDT by highwayman]
I'm talking about the real 4-legged kind that like to build dams out of sticks and mud and whatnot. They have constructed one of these debris piles behind my house and I want it gone. It's flooding the property and we're losing trees. The dam is easy to deal with, the tricky part is removing the beavers. Before y'all respond "Tannerite", "shoot it", etc. I live on only 3 acres with other homes nearby so that stuff is out of the question. Trapping comes to mind. How hard is it to trap a beaver and what kind of trap should I use? Also, what kind of bait? What will be done with the beaver after it is trapped is still up in the air. Thanks for your help. MJD
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:26:19 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:28:27 PM EDT
I would get a powerful pellet gun, i have killed skunks with mine.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:28:58 PM EDT
Find a trapper and give him the O.K. Legal and quiet.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:29:04 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:29:42 PM EDT
Trouble with beavers is you can't get enough of them!
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:30:14 PM EDT
Just let everybody around know about them and what they are doing and blast the fuckers!
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:30:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By highwayman:
I'm talking about the real 4-legged kind that like to build dams out of sticks and mud and whatnot. They have constructed one of these debris piles behind my house and I want it gone. It's flooding the property and we're losing trees. The dam is easy to deal with, the tricky part is removing the beavers. Before y'all respond "Tannerite", "shoot it", etc. I live on only 3 acres with other homes nearby so that stuff is out of the question. Trapping comes to mind. How hard is it to trap a beaver and what kind of trap should I use? Also, what kind of bait? What will be done with the beaver after it is trapped is still up in the air. Thanks for your help. MJD



I shoot them, a .22lr at dusk or dawn. A year ago this past fall, I took 11 beavers within a month from the water front.
Since the above is not acceptable to you, I would suggest a conibear trap, as far as bait, a fresh poplar pole and you should be good to go.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:31:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:33:22 PM EDT
They're VERY easy to trap. Get a Conibear 330 and do a little internet research.

And they're tasty, too.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:33:24 PM EDT
Have-a-heart traps.


Trap the little buggers, drive em out into the boonies and let them scamper off to destroy nature, as God intended.

Had the dame problem with nutria when I lived in Tx...I was always trapping the little bastards.

That said....don't kill them unless you intend to eat them.


Sheep
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:33:37 PM EDT
Conibear 330
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 2:38:47 PM EDT
Believe me, if I had my way, I'd nail the little buggers with my Marlin 60 and some CCI Stingers. I probably could, but the legal ramifications would be bad if something went wrong. I think the best bet is to trap them and release them elsewhere. I'll check out the Conibear 330, looks like that's a popular option. MJD
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:06:48 PM EDT
I have a beaver problem too. One of those bastards has now taken down five of my trees, two of which were very large.

Some libtard asshat has a mess of beavers on his property about 5 miles from me. He loves them, unfortunately, like animals will, they have multiplied to the point where they are starting to spread out and impact other land owners in the area and the lake association across the street.

Around here the beavers are treated like some kind of brown gods by the libtards and DNR and can do no wrong, so i'll be forced to SSS if I ever catch the little bastard(s) on my property.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:09:49 PM EDT
I hate fucking beavers, and they aint little they get huge.

A buddy of mines duck dog got drowned by one of those SOB's.

Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:11:43 PM EDT
I would make an "anomymous" check with your state fish and game department, or USFWS.

I say anonymous because you don't want your name on record if you have to go "stealth", if you are so inclined to take it to that level.

You can get in a peck of trouble "taking" criters out of season.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:15:31 PM EDT
Use care dealing with their lodges, dams, etc.

They can harbor some really nasty molds which can cause fatal infections.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:30:43 PM EDT
First thing: Check your state's game laws. make sure whatever you decide to do will be legal, game-law-wise. With close neighbors, it will be hard if not impossible to keep the game warden out if someone reports out of season or extra-legal game-taking.

Have-a-heart traps, Cabela's has them as do other places.

Good luck.


My .02.

Merlin
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:31:26 PM EDT
STATE OF MICHIGAN
Reply to: GRAND RAPIDS DISTRICT OFFICE STATE OFFICE BUILDING 6TH FLOOR
350 OTTAWA NW GRAND RAPIDS MI 49503-2341
JOHN ENGLER, Governor
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
HOLLISTER BUILDING, PO BOX 30473, LANSING MI 48909-7973
INTERNET: http://www.deq.state.mi
RUSSELL J. HARDING, Director

December 17, 1997

CERTIFIED

Mr. Ryan DeVries 2088 Dagget Pierson, MI 49339

Dear Mr. DeVries:

SUBJECT: DEQ File No. 97-59-0023-1 T11N, R10W, Sec. 20, Montcalm County

It has come to the attention of the Department of Environmental Quality that there has been recent unauthorized activity on the above referenced parcel of property. You have been certified as the legal landowner and/or contractor who did the following unauthorized activity:

Construction and maintenance of two wood debris dams across the outlet stream of Spring Pond. A permit must be issued prior to the start of this type of activity. A review of the Department's files show that no permits have been issued.

Therefore, the Department has determined that this activity is in violation of Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.30101 to 324.30113 of the Michigan Compiled Laws annotated. The Department has been informed that one or both of the dams partially failed during a recent rain event, causing debris dams and flooding at downstream locations. We find that dams of this nature are inherently hazardous and cannot be permitted. The Department therefore orders you to cease and desist all unauthorized activities at this location, and to restore the stream to a free-flow condition by removing all wood and brush forming the dams from the strewn channel. All restoration work shall be completed no later than January 31, 1998. Please notify this office when the restoration has been completed so that a follow-up site inspection may be scheduled by our staff. Failure to comply with this request, or any further unauthorized activity on the site, may result in this case being referred for elevated enforcement action. We anticipate and would appreciate your full cooperation in this matter.

Please feel free to contact me at this office if you have any questions.

Sincerely,

David L. Price
District Representative Land and Water Management Division




REPLY:


Dear Mr. Price:
Re: DEQ File No. 97-59-0023; T11N, R10W, Sec 20; Montcalm County

Your certified letter dated 12/17/97 has been handed to me to respond to. You sent out a great deal of carbon copies to a lot of people, but you neglected to include their addresses. You will, therefore, have to send them a copy of my response.

First of all, Mr. Ryan DeVries is not the legal landowner and/or contractor at 2088 Dagget, Pierson, Michigan - I am the legal owner and a couple of beavers are in the (State unauthorized) process of constructing and maintaining two wood "debris" dams across the outlet stream of my Spring Pond. While I did not pay for, nor authorize, their dam project, I think they would be highly offended you call their skillful use of natural building materials "debris." I would like to challenge you to attempt to emulate their dam project any dam time and/or any dam place you choose. I believe I can safely state there is no dam way you could ever match their dam skills, their dam resourcefulness, their dam ingenuity, their dam persistence, their dam determination and/or their dam work ethic.

As to your dam request the beavers first must fill out a dam permit prior to the start of this type of dam activity, my first dam question to you is: are you trying to discriminate against my Spring Pond Beavers or do you require all dam beavers throughout this State to conform to said dam request? If you are not discriminating against these particular beavers, please send me completed copies of all those other applicable beaver dam permits. Perhaps we will see if there really is a dam violation of Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.30101 to 324.30113 of the Michigan Compiled Laws annotated.

My first concern is - aren't the dam beavers entitled to dam legal representation? The Spring Pond Beavers are financially destitute and are unable to pay for said dam representation - so the State will have to provide them with a dam lawyer. The Department's dam concern that either one or both of the dams failed during a recent rain event causing dam flooding is proof we should leave the dam Spring Pond Beavers alone rather than harassing them and calling them dam names. If you want the dam stream "restored" to a dam free-flow condition - contact the dam beavers - but if you are going to arrest them (they obviously did not pay any dam attention to your dam letter-being unable to read English) - be sure you read them their dam Miranda rights first.

As for me, I am not going to cause more dam flooding or dam debris jams by interfering with these dam builders. If you want to hurt these dam beavers - be aware I am sending a copy of your dam letter and this response to PETA. If your dam Department seriously finds all dams of this nature inherently hazardous and truly will not permit their existence in this dam State - I seriously hope you are not selectively enforcing this dam policy, or once again both I and the Spring Pond Beavers will scream prejudice!

In my humble opinion, the Spring Pond Beavers have a right to build their dam unauthorized dams as long as the sky is blue, the grass is green, and water flows downstream. They have more dam right than I to live and enjoy Spring Pond. So, as far as I and the beavers are concerned, this dam case can be referred for more dam elevated enforcement action now. Why wait until 1/31/98? The Spring Pond Beavers may be under the dam ice then, and there will be no dam way for you or your dam staff to contact/harass them then. In conclusion, I would like to bring to your attention a real environmental quality (health) problem: bears are actually defecating in our woods. I definitely believe you should be persecuting the defecating bears and leave the dam beavers alone. If you are going to investigate the beaver dam, watch your step! (The bears are not careful where they dump!) Being unable to comply with your dam request, and being unable to contact you on your dam answering machine, I am sending this response to your dam office.

Sincerely,
Stephen L. Tvedten


link to original true story
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:40:56 PM EDT
my first thought when saw "Trouble with beavers" it made me think "child support"


i go out with a cousin and friends from time to time to check their traps. its usually painfully obvious which routes the beaver travel from the lake to the woods. find a spot in the tall grass where there is a beaten down trail a foot wide. put the trap starting in the entrance of the water and trail, making sure its staked down pretty good with a stick in the mud a couple feet away with a small chain.

the beaver will take on its route to the woods and get killed in the trap. check it and reset it twice daily.

as for getting rid of them.... i assume you arent any good at skinning the pelts... and dont know anyone who is since you have asked us for advice. so, after youve killed them in the trap, get out the shovel and bury them in your wifes flower garden. fertilizer....
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:42:23 PM EDT

my first thought when saw "Trouble with beavers" it made me think "child support"


Isn't that what we are talking about!
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:49:07 PM EDT
Around here if beavers are destroying property, you can legally shoot them dead.

Or shave them and spank them.

Whichever you prefer.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 3:50:39 PM EDT
.270 Win works very well and makes a big splash.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 4:06:27 PM EDT
Be slow to get the feds involved...the Federal wetlands laws may prohibit you from disturbing their pond and dealing with the problem...Federal regulations regarding animal habitat doesn't give a damn about your land or your dwellings.
I would deal with them in an inconspicuous way so as not to attract any attention from environmentalists or feds...
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 5:08:33 PM EDT
Dynamite.... Tag..... And Yes, Don't get the Feds involved... They will ruin your fun and you'll be stuck with the little suckers...
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 5:18:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By highwayman:
Believe me, if I had my way, I'd nail the little buggers with my Marlin 60 and some CCI Stingers. I probably could, but the legal ramifications would be bad if something went wrong. I think the best bet is to trap them and release them elsewhere. I'll check out the Conibear 330, looks like that's a popular option. MJD




If you use a connibear 330 to trap them there will be no releasing them. They will be dead
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 5:33:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GreyGoose:

If you use a connibear 330 to trap them there will be no releasing them. They will be dead



If that is the trap I am used to seeing in beaver areas, it is quite effective. My neighbor has some, and they work quite well.

We have also detirmined 12ga OO buck is the proper load for beaver. It accounted for 22 beaver in a 3 acre pond one night several years ago.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 5:36:02 PM EDT
I just wanted to add this in, in case you didn't know.

An adult male beaver can weigh, on the high end, from 60 to 80 lbs.

Ain't nothin little about beavers.

Link Posted: 2/20/2006 6:33:38 PM EDT
Tannerite and a live trap. Trap the beaver and then tannerite the dam.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 6:42:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ffsparky26:
I just wanted to add this in, in case you didn't know.

An adult male beaver can weigh, on the high end, from 60 to 80 lbs.

Ain't nothin little about beavers.




from my experience though in catching and releasing beaver, the Korean Beaver is usually the smallest in size.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 8:08:12 PM EDT
Find the clitoris.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 8:11:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thinman:
Find a trapper and give him the O.K. Legal and quiet.



+1
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 8:12:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/20/2006 8:18:05 PM EDT by Badseed]

Originally Posted By fish223:
STATE OF MICHIGAN
Reply to: GRAND RAPIDS DISTRICT OFFICE STATE OFFICE BUILDING 6TH FLOOR
350 OTTAWA NW GRAND RAPIDS MI 49503-2341
JOHN ENGLER, Governor
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
HOLLISTER BUILDING, PO BOX 30473, LANSING MI 48909-7973
INTERNET: http://www.deq.state.mi
RUSSELL J. HARDING, Director




First thing that popped into my mind...

If your beavers are destitute, then you have a long fight on your hands.

God, I have always loved the spring creek beavers.



Edit: The spring pond beaver escapade you have there is not the original... someone planted a lot of "dams" as, i suppose they didn't think it clever enough. I read the original years ago... just the few dams in the first and last paragraphs....
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 9:07:33 PM EDT
Well, one of my questions has been answered.

I bought this house in 2003 and the previous owners left 3-4 nasty looking leg traps hanging in the garage.

I think I know what he was using them for now.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 9:12:16 PM EDT
Beaver castor oil placed on a stick above the water. Beaver stands up to sniff and guess what, there's a trap that closes on its paw. It dives to evade, drowns itself and you've got a pelt. Like they said during the Fur Trade Era, "Beaver gonna shine a'gin."
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 10:01:17 PM EDT
'Beaver' is a pejorative term, they prefer 'Vagina Squirrel'.....
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 10:44:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 11:14:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/20/2006 11:15:43 PM EDT by AZMAN-1]
by thebeekeeper:

"The pelts are quite valuable and the meat is delicious. No, I'm not kidding".



BBQ beaver is excellent!!!! Really. As for the pelt, I have no idea but I'm sure thebeekeeper is well schooled in beaver......
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 3:55:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 4:17:42 AM EDT by Rodent]
You can make a little breach in their dam and set a trap there. They'll be along to repair it pretty quickly.

They're also very easy to snare. You can find their trails easier than any other animal. For some reason, they don't struggle - they'll be sitting there quietly when you show up. You'll need a .22 or something to dispatch them with.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:05:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 6:08:53 AM EDT by highwayman]
Alright everybody, update. I have found out that in my county there is a continuous open-season on beaver. From the department of Game & Inland Fisheries,

"Trapping Seasons:
There is a continuous open season to trap beaver, muskrat, opossum and raccoon within the incorporated limits of any city or town in the Commonwealth, and in the counties of Arlington, Chesterfield, Fairfax, Henrico, James City, Loudoun, Prince William, Spotsylvania, Stafford, Roanoke and York."

Continued:

"The use of body gripping traps with a jaw spread in excess of 7.5 inches is prohibited except when such traps are covered by water. "

"Resident or non-resident landowners, their spouses, their children and grandchildren and the spouses of such children and grandchildren, or the landowner’s parents, resident or nonresident, do not need a license to hunt, trap or fish within the boundaries of their own lands and inland waters."


So, from all this, it looks like I am allowed to use a conibear 330 at any time of the year, as long as I keep it completely submerged, and since I am the resident landowner, I do not even need a trapping license. Yippee! MJD
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:10:35 AM EDT
tag for later
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:31:44 AM EDT
I had the same problem. I contacted the DFG and they told me that had two choices: Live with them or kill them. Now, they left the method of killing completely up to me. They said if I trap them, then make sure they don't leave my property and somehow find their way to another county, since they are considered a rodent-pest.

My 28 year old son and I formed a sniper team. We used a scoped .22 bolt action, a ton of patience and some .22cal short subsonic CB rounds, but we got three of the buggers and they haven't returned. We also used a VERY bright light and only hunted them at night and VERY carefully, being extra careful to ensure that there was NO chance of sending an errant round where it wasn't supposed to go. I did speak with the other two folks living on our pond..and they both approved of my actions. I remember one we shot floated and I had to use my fishing rod to hook the bastard and reel him into shore.

You can pay a trapper...but it is going to cost you a ton. Or...you can set your own traps if you know how...but it is rather cold right now.

Now I have muskrats and they are a real problem too.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:33:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SheepDog_556:
Have-a-heart traps.


Trap the little buggers, drive em out into the boonies and let them scamper off to destroy nature, as God intended.

Had the dame problem with nutria when I lived in Tx...I was always trapping the little bastards.

That said....don't kill them unless you intend to eat them.


Sheep



We can't do that here in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Beavers are a rodent and classified as a pest. IIRC, hunting season on them is 365.

Ranger lady told me I'd be cited and have to pay a fine if they cought me trapping and moving beavers.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:45:11 AM EDT
Uhm....a lawnchair, a 6 pack, and some .22 CB's? Out of a rifle length barrel they are pellet gun loud... Aim for an easy target like the head....otherwise shitty shot placement will just prolong the poor buggers deaths. MmmMmm mama said beaver was the devil.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:50:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LWilde:
...
My 28 year old son and I formed a sniper team. We used a scoped .22 bolt action, a ton of patience and some .22cal short subsonic CB rounds, but we got three of the buggers and they haven't returned. We also used a VERY bright light and only hunted them at night and VERY carefully, being extra careful to ensure that there was NO chance of sending an errant round where it wasn't supposed to go. I did speak with the other two folks living on our pond..and they both approved of my actions. I remember one we shot floated and I had to use my fishing rod to hook the bastard and reel him into shore.

...



I was surveying the area last night and concluded that I *could* snipe the little buggers from a second floor window. At that elevation it gets me high enough to get a decent line of sight back to the dam area. It's maybe a 2-300 yard shot. No big deal for my scoped AR and some 68 gr. Black Hills rounds. This purely a possibility, and I would by no means conduct such an operation as it's too dangerous in a residential area. Definitely going to try the 330 trap. I'll post some pics of the dam tonight and the results of operation, "castor canadensis exterminus" later. MJD
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:53:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Calestus:
Uhm....a lawnchair, a 6 pack, and some .22 CB's? Out of a rifle length barrel they are pellet gun loud... Aim for an easy target like the head....otherwise shitty shot placement will just prolong the poor buggers deaths. MmmMmm mama said beaver was the devil.



I do hope you're refering to a 6-pack of soda, as alcohol and firearms don't mix. EVER. MJD
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 7:24:56 AM EDT
tag for the pics
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:39:30 AM EDT
I am now a licensed trapper in the commonwealth of Virginia. I got the permit just to be sure I'm doing everything legally and there are no potential illegalities. I'm going tonight to get a couple of conibear 330 traps. What I plan on doing is, first, knock a few small/medium sized holes in their dam, and then set the traps at the sites of the holes. When they come to repair the dams, SNAP! I hope. It might take a few tries to get the placement right, but we'll see what happens. Wish me luck. MJD
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:10:07 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:16:21 AM EDT
if your going to do this you need to buy a the Mountain men on DVD.


Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:32:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
I'd only buy one--and I would set it at the den entrance. They cost ~$30 each, and one will do. You will likely need a spring compressor too, at least until you are proficient at setting them. If you buy a new one, you will need to properly adjust the trigger--from close together to a medium-wide "V"--and learn to keep the spring retainers on TOP, so they don't fall off on their own. Also, don't forget to flip them over once it is set(!), as most all animals become 'trap shy" if they aren't caught the first time. You will need two rods to hold the trap in place. I use 3/8" "all-thread" with a jam nut and fender washer and lock nut on top. Set the trap (leaving the spring keepers in place!), put the chain ring over one of the rods, position the trap in the opening to the den (you will need hip waders to get to it), then push each rod inside the springs--one on each side. Once it is secure, flip the spring keepers over. The trap is now set. Be sure to put the ring on the end of the chain on one of the rods--and the fender washer keeps it from coming off the top. If you do this in the afternoon you will likely have a dead beaver around dusk. I'd strongly recommend waiting until morning to recover it, as this kind of stuff is a bit dangerous in the dark.

Learn how to properly skin it--then sell te pelt, or (better, IMO) send it off to be tanned and use it to decorate your home. They are VERY luxurious and beautiful--and look GREAT on the foot of your bed or the back of your davenport.

As I said above, the meat is delicious. Just bone it out and grind it into burger. You will be surprised how little meat there is on a 50# beaver--they are all pelt, bone, head, and tail.

Good luck--and be careful.



Thanks very much for the advice. I don't plan on setting the traps until Friday so I can go check the traps Saturday morning. I just want to be ready and make sure I know how to set them properly before I actually go into the water and set it. Have you ever used the rope method to set the trap? I found instructions for it at the North Carolina DNR. It seemed pretty simple and didn't require setting tongs. I'll post pics of whatever I catch in my "Post 2000" topic in Team Forum. MJD
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