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Posted: 2/19/2006 6:22:13 PM EDT
1. Which has existed the longest as an organized and regular fighting force, the United States Army or the United States Navy (don't even bother saying Air Force, it won't be funny and it won't be cute)?

2. What fighting force has existed the longest, continuously, in the world?
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:24:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

2. What fighting force has existed the longest, continuously, in the world?



The Swiss Guards (1506) followed by the Netherlands Marine Corps (1665).
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:25:21 PM EDT
The answer to #1 is the US Navy, I believe.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:26:53 PM EDT
Navy 1775
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:28:19 PM EDT
The Catholic Church.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:31:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:31:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/19/2006 6:32:16 PM EDT by tom1000rr]
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:35:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fike:
Navy 1775



Army June 14, 1775
Navy October 13, 1775
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:41:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/19/2006 6:42:31 PM EDT by blstrk]
The Continental Army was formed on June 14, 1775, before the establishment of the United States, to meet the demands of the American Revolutionary War. Congress created the United States Army on June 3, 1784 after the end of the American Revolutionary War, to replace the disbanded Continental Army.
The United States Navy can trace its origins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established during the American Revolutionary War. The United States Constitution, ratified in 1789, empowered Congress "to provide and maintain a navy." Acting on this authority, Congress ordered the construction and manning of six frigates; one of the original six, USS Constitution, familiarly known as "Old Ironsides," survives to this day.

The War Department administered naval affairs from that year until Congress established the Department of the Navy on April 30, 1798.

ETA: info from wikipedia
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:44:21 PM EDT
The Israelites. 3200 B.C. They "Smote" the Canaanites
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 6:45:38 PM EDT
The armed US citizen is far older than the army and the navy.

The chief deterrent of attacking the US is the fact that, as the Japs knew, there would be a rifle behind every blade of grass, and an American waiting to pull the trigger.

WE, the gun owners of the US are the oldest and most effective American fighting force. We have served this country since before it was a country, we have never lost, and as long as there IS an America, we will never lose.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:04:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sylvan:
14th June 1775 for the Army.
National Guard goes back to the 1600s.

The National Guard only goes back that far if you count all of the various militias and military clubs as being the National Guard. You really have to stretch the rules to state that the NG has been around since the 1600s.

For context, I'll use the 10th Mountain Division as an example. The 10th Mountain has technically existed since the 1940s. However, after WWII the 10th is deactivated until 1985. It was then reestablished as a regular light infantry division. Technically you could say that the 10th has been around since the 40s. In reality, the current incarnation of the 10th has been around only since 85.

It is the same way with the National Guard. From the colonial militias to the Minutemen, to the volunteer regiments of the Civil War, there have always been organizations with a similar mission to the National Guard's current mission. However, the National Guard only dates back to the first part of the twentieth century.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:22:06 PM EDT
The Masons.


B_S

Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:23:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By USAF_Hop_N_Pop:
The armed US citizen is far older than the army and the navy.

The chief deterrent of attacking the US is the fact that, as the Japs knew, there would be a rifle behind every blade of grass, and an American waiting to pull the trigger.

WE, the gun owners of the US are the oldest and most effective American fighting force. We have served this country since before it was a country, we have never lost, and as long as there IS an America, we will never lose.



But we are not an organized and regular fighting force.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:23:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By julenissen:

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

2. What fighting force has existed the longest, continuously, in the world?



The Swiss Guards (1506) followed by the Netherlands Marine Corps (1665).



My regiment (Danish Royal Guard) has been in continual operation since it was established in 1658.

Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:30:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By julenissen:

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

2. What fighting force has existed the longest, continuously, in the world?



The Swiss Guards (1506) followed by the Netherlands Marine Corps (1665).



My regiment (Danish Royal Guard) has been in continual operation since it was established in 1658.




During WW2 as well?
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 10:43:01 PM EDT
A couple of years ago, the Irish Army vacated Collins Barracks, Dublin during a selling off of extra bases. It was in pretty decent condition for being the oldest continually used barracks in the world. (1701). (Barracks is local term for 'urban base')

Puts the US Army into perspective.

NTM
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 10:48:57 PM EDT
November 7th, 1775. Not the oldest but that says it all.

SF,
BJohnson
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 10:59:57 PM EDT
november 10 1775 for the usmc.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 11:13:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sylvan:
14th June 1775 for the Army.
National Guard goes back to the 1600s.



No, Various "militias" date back that far and further, the National Guard dates back to the dick act of 1909(I think thats the year, correct me if I'm wrong).

Chris
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 11:20:00 PM EDT
Doesn't the Spanish Navy go back pretty far?
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 8:31:30 AM EDT
The National Guard under that name only goes back to the early 1900's. The state units themselves have histories, and lineages going back to the 1636 IIRC. Those older militias are the fathers of the current NG.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 9:42:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/20/2006 9:46:05 AM EDT by DK-Prof]

Originally Posted By julenissen:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By julenissen:

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

2. What fighting force has existed the longest, continuously, in the world?



The Swiss Guards (1506) followed by the Netherlands Marine Corps (1665).



My regiment (Danish Royal Guard) has been in continual operation since it was established in 1658.




During WW2 as well?



I think so.

After the Danish uprising in 1943, and sporadic firefights, the Danish army and Navy (who sunk most of their ships) officers and enlisted men were detained on their bases, and the nazis took control of meteriel and armories - but I don't think units were disbanded and then reconstituted after the war. Thus, while the unit was disarmed from 1943 to 1945, it was not disbanded, and still maintained its structure, etc.

I suppose I could be wrong - in some sense, it may be a matter of interpretation and semantics. Certainly, no part of the Danish army (including my regiment) could operate independently after august 1943.
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