Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 2/17/2006 5:05:04 AM EDT
Looking for an excellent chip / salsa combination ... Something you can purchase outside of a restaurant. I've tried the Border Salsa and it's OK ... Only chips I care for at this point are the Tostitos restaurant style ...

I don't like the salsa to be so hot that it's unpleasant to eat but I do like a little kick. Suggestions?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:14:25 AM EDT
Herdez brand Salsa Casera, hot. The hot isn't really that hot, probably about like La Victoria Salsa Suprema medium. +1 on the Tostitos.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:18:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mark75101:
Herdez brand Salsa Casera, hot. The hot isn't really that hot, probably about like La Victoria Salsa Suprema medium. +1 on the Tostitos.



Excellent. I'll see if I can dig some of the salsa up. Anyone else?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:21:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2006 5:25:14 AM EDT by mousehunter]
We have tons of micro salsa's here in Austin - quite a few sold fresh in better grocery stores. That said, looks like you are out of salsa country up there. As such, dig out some reciepies. Salsa is basically tomattoes, onion, jalapinoes, cilantro, garlic, and salt (I think in that order). Not terribly hard to make if you have 5 minutes and a blender. Seed the peppers for milder salsa. I tend to use canned tomatoes, but think fresh should work. Elton Brown did a eposide - he sqeezed the tomatoes slightly before blending to keep excess juice out of the salsa.

Please forgive me if I am not pointing out the finer points between pico de gallo, salsa, and picante sauses. Not to mention a few others (like tomatillo salsas).
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:54:20 AM EDT
If you're gonna buy it in a store, the best one that I've found is Santa Barbara Deli Style Salsa. Most Costcos carry it, if you have one nearby. Superb, fresh flavor. I know lots of people are fans of the cooked salsa, and if that's what you've got a yen for, there's no substitute, but to me, fresh almost always = better.

Of course, like Mouse said above, it's not too hard to make yourself, doesn't take long, you can make it however you want, and it's kinda fun, so why not!
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 6:01:03 AM EDT
My favorite chips in decending order-

1. Santina's Resturant Style
2. Mission Tortilla Strips
3. Rico's

Salsa is largely a matter of VERY subjective taste.

I prefer mild to medium and, very chunky.

The only consistant thing I've see re: Tortilla chips is that refigerated
Sala is generally not any good.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 6:09:45 AM EDT
I'll have to agree with the freshness aspect ... There's not much better than fresh pico ...

I suck at cooking. I can make spaghetti (canned sauce), hamburgers, hotdogs, and oh yeah, anything that comes from a can. I guess I'll give the roll-your-own salsa a try though. Seems to me that canned tomatoes wouldn't be any good for that route but I guess it goes back to a matter of time to prepare and perhaps individual taste to a degree.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 6:10:13 AM EDT
I agree with the guy above who said salsa taste is subjective. I prefer non-chunky with little to no cilantro. I think that some people make up for shitty salsa by dumping in tons of cilantro.

If you want my opinion. There are NO salsa brands worth buying at your local supermarket. I have never found one that is worth anything. I have occasionally found a local brand that is sold in one or two stores, but nothing larger than a regional type.

I tried some salsa from a booth at a fair that blew my mind. This stuff was awesome, only fresh ingredients, no canned tomatoes etc. I bought a 1 quart jar on the spot. After I quickly finished that jar off I bought a case of 5 jars and had it shipped to my house. The company that makes it is a small mom and pop operation, so I was worried that the taste would be inconsistent from jar to jar. It wasn't and I am happy to recommend whatasalsa!

I buy the extra-hot, non-chunky. Try it, you'll love the stuff.

www.whatasalsa.com

*I have no affliation, nor do I know the owners of this company. My review is based solely on the great product they sell*
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 6:19:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 6:43:17 AM EDT
I might be out of place here being from Pennsylvania--
But I make my own salsa. I've had many favorable comments about it. One thing I do is grill my vegetables. Grill the tomatoes, onions and peppers. When I grill the vegetables I use a mix of hickory and mesquite wood. It adds a very district flavor to the salsa, plus through the grilling you get rid of a lot of the liquid making the salsa a little thicker.

By the way the only thing I get from the store to put in my salsa are some of the spices and garlic. Everything else comes out of my garden.

Once again I'm not a pro here, I've never had "real" salsa, but what I make beats anything I've ever had out of a store. Try making some of your own! It's easy and rewarding!
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:23:52 AM EDT
salsa fresca( a la pico de gallo) or from dried peppers? Yes make your own chips as said.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:31:39 AM EDT
Mrs. Renfro's Jalapeno Green Salsa

Tostito's Yellow Corn chips
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:28:57 AM EDT
I may be a salsa neophyte, what with living in MD, but Green Mountain Gringo salsa is damn good, as is Desert Pepper Trading Company salsa. I like spicy stuff, and the GMG hot is pretty hot.

Green Mountain Gringo tortilla strips are by far the best chips I have ever found.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:35:28 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:37:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mark75101:
Herdez brand Salsa Casera, hot. The hot isn't really that hot, probably about like La Victoria Salsa Suprema medium. +1 on the Tostitos.



+1

It's not the hottest out there, but I think it has the best flavor.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:38:35 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:43:11 AM EDT
I can't stand chunky salsa. Pico is another matter entirely. I don't prefer cilantro in my salsa either but you can't have a good pico without it and it tastes awesome in there.

Someone mentioned above that they'd never found a good salsa at the store and that was my sole reason for posting this. There are a few suggestions I'm going to try and the self-made tortilla chips look very interesting.

The whatasalsa.com looks interesting too, I'll check it out.

Thankfully, no one dared mention Pace picante sauce ...
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:46:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By twl:
You just get a stack of store-bought round corn tortillas about 6" diameter, in the plastic bag.
Then you come home and heat up your frying pan and put in a decent amount of corn oil.
Cut the corn tortillas into the triangle-shaped pieces and pan fry them in the corn oil.
When you take them out of the fry pan, you put them on a brown paper or something to wick off some of the excess oil that comes out on them.
Salt them when you put them on the paper, before all the oil gets soaked off by the paper.
This is the key to a really good start at this snack, and it is perfect for nachos too.



It's so simple, I don't know why I never thought of it but you can bet I'll try it. Any particular brand of tortilla?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:47:37 AM EDT
Locate a local member of the hispanic population.
Ask him/her to score you some aztecian salsa.

It's the original (Aztec) recipe that is usually found in
mexican enclaves. It's always made fresh locally
by the best cook in the community. (Serious stuff).

If you are required to give a secret password, it is usually
something declarative like: Ole' or Arriba!

Forget commercial chips. As mentioned above, make your own.

We buy seven grain bread-(Arnold's, Pepperidge Farm)-any dense
bread with corn as one of the first ingredients.

Remove the crust from a half dozen slizes, microwave them for 45
seconds to soften. Roll out each piece whil still hot into wafer thin slices.
Cut into bite (dipping) sized pieces.
Place pieces on cookie sheet and under broiler for one minute each side.

Voila! Good Eats!
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:48:26 AM EDT
I make my own (though it's more of a pico de gallo)

I use
2 Habanero peppers
2 Serano peppers
2 Jalepeno peppers
1/2 onion
2 cloves of garlic
Some fresh cilantro (I prefer quite a bit, but I find most people just like a little or none).
2 Roma tomatoes

I dice everything and throw it in one of those "as seen on TV" salsa makers.

Sometimes I'll add dried Cayenne pepper, or a tomatillo or lime juice for variety.

I'll have to try the homemade chips.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:48:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fatk1d:
I can't stand chunky salsa. Pico is another matter entirely. I don't prefer cilantro in my salsa either but you can't have a good pico without it and it tastes awesome in there.

Someone mentioned above that they'd never found a good salsa at the store and that was my sole reason for posting this. There are a few suggestions I'm going to try and the self-made tortilla chips look very interesting.

The whatasalsa.com looks interesting too, I'll check it out.

Thankfully, no one dared mention Pace picante sauce ...




The only sauce I will buy from a store is Pace and I always get the thick and chunky. For store brands I think that is the best out there. Everything else in the store is just liquified tomato paste with no flavor.

As for chips I have to agree with you that Tostitos restaurant are the way to go.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:50:26 AM EDT
Ok, someones gotta say it....

The easiest and most democratic thing to do is....

hire an illegal to do it for you...
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:53:44 AM EDT
Regular Tostito's Chips and Tostito Hot salsa.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 9:30:22 AM EDT
Still haven't found a good store bought salsa.

Link Posted: 2/17/2006 1:44:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 4:44:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By twl:

Originally Posted By fatk1d:

Originally Posted By twl:
You just get a stack of store-bought round corn tortillas about 6" diameter, in the plastic bag.
Then you come home and heat up your frying pan and put in a decent amount of corn oil.
Cut the corn tortillas into the triangle-shaped pieces and pan fry them in the corn oil.
When you take them out of the fry pan, you put them on a brown paper or something to wick off some of the excess oil that comes out on them.
Salt them when you put them on the paper, before all the oil gets soaked off by the paper.
This is the key to a really good start at this snack, and it is perfect for nachos too.



It's so simple, I don't know why I never thought of it but you can bet I'll try it. Any particular brand of tortilla?



TWL:

OK, I tried the above and it works great! Further, the chips make all the difference ...

My next question is how well do they "keep"? How long can I keep them hanging around either in a cabinet or in the 'fridge?

I haven't really found that much difference betwen tortilla brands.
Just make sure that they are corn tortillas, and not the flour tortillas.
They are pretty cheap for a big ol' stack of 'em at the grocery store.
Fry them till they just start to get a tinge of color to them, because they will be plenty crispy anyway, after you take them out of the oil. You'll soon get the hang of how long you like to cook them.
You'll love it, and if you make them for your friends when they come over for a ball game or something, they'll wonder how in the heck your nachos are so damn good!

Link Posted: 2/20/2006 5:34:47 PM EDT
Top Top