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Posted: 2/16/2006 9:39:01 AM EDT
Thursday, February 16, 2006

SAN FRANCISCO — California's attorney general told a judge Wednesday that the state would employ an anesthesiologist to make sure a death row inmate suffers no extreme pain during execution.

To comply with Tuesday's order by U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel of San Jose, the anesthesiologist must determine that Michael Morales is unconscious after he's given a sedative. Only then, under the judge's order, can a paralyzing agent and finally a heart-stopping drug be administered.

A spokesman for Attorney General Bill Lockyer said having the anesthesiologist present during next week's scheduled execution is "one of the best options available."

"It gives the state an opportunity to develop a clear record (about) what medical experts have already said: a person executed under California lethal injection protocol receives no pain," Lockyer spokesman Nathan Barankin said.



Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:40:23 AM EDT
Whatever...just keep it in California.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:41:28 AM EDT
What's wrong with that?

It's brilliant, because it weakens any Constitutional challenge on the basis of "cruel and unusual punishment" that deathrow inmates invariably try to file at the last minute.

That might not be their intent - but it should make it easier for courts to dismiss such appeals.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:42:08 AM EDT
They need Dr. Phil to hold his hand and have the Oak Ridge Boys send him off with "Nearer My God to Thee."
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:50:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
What's wrong with that?

It's brilliant, because it weakens any Constitutional challenge on the basis of "cruel and unusual punishment" that deathrow inmates invariably try to file at the last minute.

That might not be their intent - but it should make it easier for courts to dismiss such appeals.


Other than the fact of me paying for a death row inmate to have a licensed and well paid anesthesiologist present at his death?

I don't think he qualifies for anything more than the gas, and would prefer a $0.25 .45ACP.

My 2 ducats.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:53:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By j-fonz:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
What's wrong with that?

It's brilliant, because it weakens any Constitutional challenge on the basis of "cruel and unusual punishment" that deathrow inmates invariably try to file at the last minute.

That might not be their intent - but it should make it easier for courts to dismiss such appeals.


Other than the fact of me paying for a death row inmate to have a licensed and well paid anesthesiologist present at his death?

I don't think he qualifies for anything more than the gas, and would prefer a $0.25 .45ACP.

My 2 ducats.




Of the HUGE cost for all of the legal appeals, etc, and of keeping these assholes alive on death row for decades, the anesthesiologist is probably a small portion.

I wouldn't be surprised if the doc does it for free - rather than having to "profit" from participating in an execution (Socratic Oath and all that).


I essentially agree with you - but was just pointing out that there might also be a benefit to this.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:54:04 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:55:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By j-fonz:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
What's wrong with that?

It's brilliant, because it weakens any Constitutional challenge on the basis of "cruel and unusual punishment" that deathrow inmates invariably try to file at the last minute.

That might not be their intent - but it should make it easier for courts to dismiss such appeals.


Other than the fact of me paying for a death row inmate to have a licensed and well paid anesthesiologist present at his death?

I don't think he qualifies for anything more than the gas, and would prefer a $0.25 .45ACP.

My 2 ducats.




Of the HUGE cost for all of the legal appeals, etc, and of keeping these assholes alive on death row for decades, the anesthesiologist is probably a small portion.

I wouldn't be surprised if the doc does it for free - rather than having to "profit" from participating in an execution (Socratic Oath and all that).


I essentially agree with you - but was just pointing out that there might also be a benefit to this.


Agreed. I would like to see some concrete figures of how much money a death row inmate absorbs during his time behind bars.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:20:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
What's wrong with that?

It's brilliant, because it weakens any Constitutional challenge on the basis of "cruel and unusual punishment" that deathrow inmates invariably try to file at the last minute.

That might not be their intent - but it should make it easier for courts to dismiss such appeals.




Although I can see your point of view, to me, this is just another step in the direction of criminals not being held accountable for their actions. There is no deterrent anymore, get sentenced to death...we'll give you three squares a day, get you high and you won't feel a thing...don't worry about it bud.

I for one am against the death penalty as it is applied in this country, but I guess that's for another day.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:23:58 AM EDT
I think the firing squad is quicker, more humane, and less cruel than the electric chair or gas chamber.

Doesn't Utah still do the firing squad?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:31:33 AM EDT
If I ever do anything to deserve the death penalty, I hope I do it in kali.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:39:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jblachly:
I think the firing squad is quicker, more humane, and less cruel than the electric chair or gas chamber.

Doesn't Utah still do the firing squad?



It is still an option in Utah and Idaho, as is hanging if I remember correctly.

-Ben
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:42:39 AM EDT
+1 for hanging. String the bastards up.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:47:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jblachly:
I think the firing squad is quicker, more humane, and less cruel than the electric chair or gas chamber.

Doesn't Utah still do the firing squad?


Methods of capital punishment by state:

Stickin', fryin', shootin', danglin', etc.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:49:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jblachly:
I think the firing squad is quicker, more humane, and less cruel than the electric chair or gas chamber.

Doesn't Utah still do the firing squad?



+1

That'd be my preference if I was the one getting executed.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:50:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By motown_steve:
Whatever...just keep it in California.



Thats the problem....they are exporting their liberalism just like Saudi, Iran, "Palestine", Indonesia, etc....etc...are exporting their terrorists...

Did I just equate liberals with terrorists???? Guess its not that much of a stretch...
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:52:18 AM EDT
No worries, the San Francisco District Attorney doesn't even pursue the death penalty for cop killers.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:52:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RockHard13F:

Originally Posted By jblachly:
I think the firing squad is quicker, more humane, and less cruel than the electric chair or gas chamber.

Doesn't Utah still do the firing squad?



It is still an option in Utah and Idaho, as is hanging if I remember correctly.

-Ben



Yes, I beleive in Utah, not sure on Idaho, you can choose, hanging, firing squad or either letahal injection or electrocution.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:20:24 PM EDT
Someone explain why we need a trained anesthesiologist to do the job? It's not like it's a problem if he overdoses. Just pump him full of a half gallon of the stuff and call it a day.
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