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Posted: 2/15/2006 1:45:26 PM EDT
What is the purpose? Killin' snakes on the trail? Shooting rats in the barn? Is anybody using these (and what for)?
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 1:46:14 PM EDT
snakes
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 1:46:36 PM EDT
to give handguns the ability to cause involuntary defecation of burgulars when they are cycled
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 1:46:57 PM EDT
They work great for disciplining the Ho's. Give me my money.. No.. Bam!
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 1:47:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2006 1:47:20 PM EDT by ZitiForBreakfast]
Dick Cheney likes them, or so I have heard...



For real...I tried a few in my .40 at some paper and some cans....After doing that, I figured that there is no purpose for them.

Link Posted: 2/15/2006 1:47:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2006 1:47:43 PM EDT by HardShell]

Originally Posted By xinflt:
What is the purpose? Killin' snakes on the trail? Shooting rats in the barn? Is anybody using these?



Yes. Yes. Yes.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 1:48:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HardShell:

Originally Posted By xinflt:
What is the purpose? Killin' snakes on the trail? Shooting rats in the barn? Is anybody using these (and what for)?



Yes. Yes. Yes.



I posted that I think there is no use. I do not walk on trails....I have no barn...
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 1:49:47 PM EDT
I tried them on a squirrel once with a .22 Didn't work.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 1:53:05 PM EDT
I remember reading somewhere that such rounds cause excessive wear on the rifling of a barrel, but I don't believe it.

Are they?
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:00:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
I remember reading somewhere that such rounds cause excessive wear on the rifling of a barrel, but I don't believe it.

Are they?



No, they cause no harm.

The kind I use are handloaded by myself. I use Speer Shot Cups and load them with #9 shot or even smaller if I can find it.

The plastic cup travels down the bore and keeps the shot from even touching the rifling.

I have loaded both .38 Special and .44 Magnum shotshells. I've killed a lot of evil snakes with them. Never had a failure.

The .44's make the snake look like it was run over by a truck.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:01:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TrashHeap:
I tried them on a squirrel once with a .22 Didn't work.



.22 Shotshells are much weaker than centerfire pistol shotshells. .22's only work at very close range.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:03:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2006 2:06:38 PM EDT by HardShell]

Originally Posted By ZitiForBreakfast:

Originally Posted By HardShell:

Originally Posted By xinflt:
What is the purpose? Killin' snakes on the trail? Shooting rats in the barn? Is anybody using these (and what for)?



Yes. Yes. Yes.



I posted that I think there is no use. I do not walk on trails....I have no barn...



Well, I do and I do.

But I've found them most useful around my pond. I can't tell you how many snakes I have killed with a long-barreled .38 and shotshells over the years while fishing (and a few while cutting grass). I've put away a few big barn rats as well, with no damage to the structure. I have found them very useful, but YMMV (esp. you "city folk" ).
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:04:13 PM EDT
I impressed the hell out of the neighbor kids shooting water ballons out of the air from the hip with my .45


The dad wanted to try it.
Sure I say let me reload the magazine for you, with real ammo, then he chased the ballons to the ground and never figured it out
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:05:16 PM EDT
I am five miles to the west of Detroit. The only barns around here are at the apple orchards clear on the other side of the county
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:08:05 PM EDT
Interesting. I had assumed the shot traveled down the barrel just like a shotgun.

If it did, would that cause excessive wear?


Originally Posted By Old_Painless:

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
I remember reading somewhere that such rounds cause excessive wear on the rifling of a barrel, but I don't believe it.

Are they?



No, they cause no harm.

The kind I use are handloaded by myself. I use Speer Shot Cups and load them with #9 shot or even smaller if I can find it.

The plastic cup travels down the bore and keeps the shot from even touching the rifling.

I have loaded both .38 Special and .44 Magnum shotshells. I've killed a lot of evil snakes with them. Never had a failure.

The .44's make the snake look like it was run over by a truck.

Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:10:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HardShell:

But I've found them most useful around my pond. I can't tell you how many snakes I have killed with a long-barreled .38 and shotshells over the years while fishing (and a few while cutting grass).



One of the most "funnest" days I ever had was when I visited a friend's farm where he raised crawfish. We had both a .38 Special and my .44 Mag with shotshells.

We walked around the ponds and shot snakes by the bushel load. We then used a stick to throw them into the pond to feed the crawfish.

Payback time.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:12:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Nightdriver:
I impressed the hell out of the neighbor kids shooting water ballons out of the air from the hip with my .45


The dad wanted to try it.
Sure I say let me reload the magazine for you, with real ammo, then he chased the ballons to the ground and never figured it out



You'll go to hell for that one.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:14:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
Interesting. I had assumed the shot traveled down the barrel just like a shotgun.

If it did, would that cause excessive wear?




No, the shot is soft lead. It would not cause any harm.

The shotshells are brittle plastic, that you load full of shot, then seat a soft plastic base into the shell to close it up.

You then load the capsule base first into the shell and crimp them in place.

When shot, the rifling scores deep cuts in the plastic shell cup and upon exiting the bore, it breaks up into small pieces. The patterns can be measured on a piece of cardboard and are usually pretty good at 10 to 12 feet.

The snakes have never filed a complaint.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:19:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Nightdriver:
I impressed the hell out of the neighbor kids shooting water ballons out of the air from the hip with my .45


The dad wanted to try it.
Sure I say let me reload the magazine for you, with real ammo, then he chased the ballons to the ground and never figured it out



Sounds like something I'd do.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:22:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 2:24:34 PM EDT
I hunt rabbits with them out of my .45 ACP from my mountain bike. The cottontails flush about 15 feet from the bike, making for easy shots.

The .22 shotshells are only good for small birds and mice or rats at close range. But the .45s have 1/3 ounce of #9 shot, plenty for rabbits and the like.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 5:45:55 PM EDT
I remember a magazine article that explained how to make "junkyard dog" reloads with the shot casings. Instead of shot, they used cut off sections of finishing nails.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 5:52:15 PM EDT
Snakes

The Ultimate Snakekiller -



Very stout handloads with #12 shot. A rattlesnakes worst nightmare.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:07:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By adair_usmc:
Snakes

The Ultimate Snakekiller -

img.photobucket.com/albums/v392/adairtd/DSC00632.jpg

Very stout handloads with #12 shot. A rattlesnakes worst nightmare.



Thats the 1st time I have seen a 105mm Howitzer not on a trailer
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:11:13 PM EDT
I use them to shoot rats in the garage. Luckily no snakes to worry about.

Bicycle mounted anti-rabbit cavalry? Sounds interesting.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 1:25:16 AM EDT
I have seen in a magazine a guy shooting clays with a .45 shell.
Effective for impressing his friends who were not told it was not a regular bullet.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 1:42:53 AM EDT
I load 45 colt and 38/357 shells with 00-000-pellets and sometimes a mixture of all the mentioned. And a few items I wont mention due to the liability factor for some dildo this and trying it at home.
They do make a fine bush/snake/Jehovah's witness round.
Plus they are fun as crap at the farm/range with soda cans. It rips them to shreds. Snakes and cans that is.
They serve a purpose as far as backpacking or woods travel for snakes, unless you are a perfect shot like some here are and can hit a snake between the eyes at 15 yards between the eyes with one shot, on a hill, in high wind, in a quick draw, with a pack on shooting between two people.
Otherwise they are just fun as hell to load and play with at the range.
You would be very suprised at some of the loads we have come up with to shoot out of my 454 Blackhawk.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 1:50:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
to give handguns the ability to cause involuntary defecation of burgulars when they are cycled



Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:31:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Magurgle:

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
to give handguns the ability to cause involuntary defecation of burgulars when they are cycled






That's right, but you have to keep cycling the gun until it's empty.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:49:19 AM EDT
US issued .45 shot during WWII to air force crew.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:51:23 AM EDT
What commercially available shotshell is available in .44Mag that would be good for rattlesnakes?
I carry a S&W629 in my rucksack when I go camping and usually have it loaded with 240gr SJW as bear repellent. For the summer months I am thinking it might be wise to have a better snake round loaded up for the first few shot as I am more likely to need to remove a snake from my path with little warning as compared to dealing with a bear which I should be able to spot a good distance away.

What kind of effective range can I expect?
I dont feel like pissing off a rattler.....but I'm thinking a scatter shot will work better than a single lead bullet (unless the critter is already in striking distance)
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:02:30 AM EDT
Some pistol and rifle require a smooth bore for shot. Smooth bore pistol require an government registration $5.00 I think

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:03:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 4:05:32 AM EDT by John_Wayne777]

Originally Posted By xinflt:
What is the purpose? Killin' snakes on the trail? Shooting rats in the barn? Is anybody using these (and what for)?



They are great for busting baloons that you toss into the air.

But they pretty much suck for killing anything bigger than a bumble bee....

But my experience is only with puny shotshells (.22, etc...) Something like a .44 magnum loaded with shotshells might produce different results.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:06:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
I remember reading somewhere that such rounds cause excessive wear on the rifling of a barrel, but I don't believe it.

Are they?



No, they cause no harm.

The kind I use are handloaded by myself. I use Speer Shot Cups and load them with #9 shot or even smaller if I can find it.

The plastic cup travels down the bore and keeps the shot from even touching the rifling.

I have loaded both .38 Special and .44 Magnum shotshells. I've killed a lot of evil snakes with them. Never had a failure.

The .44's make the snake look like it was run over by a truck.



Snakes 'o Truth?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:14:46 AM EDT

What is the purpose? Killin' snakes on the trail? Shooting rats in the barn? Is anybody using these (and what for)?


... mammoths and cave bears..
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:17:50 AM EDT
They are great for their intended purpose. However, I keep encountering folks who thinks it's a good idea to load them in a carry weapon. The reasoning is usally, "It'll let them know I mean business without killing them."
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:18:31 AM EDT
Shot cartridges in handguns are not particularly useful.

They are acceptable on snakes at short ranges. I have also used them to harvet bird-feeder marauding squirrels, and they are very good for removing unwanted nesting robins from sheds and garages without blowing the shingles off the roof.

Effective range is measured in feet. I will not bother with the little .22 LR shot caps.. The 38/357 caps still have a VERY small payload. The larger 45 and 44 caps pack a lot more shot. Rifling in the barrel tends to impart spin on the shot cap, and shot is dispersed VERY rapidly. Effective range is about 20 feet in my book.

Given the larger shot size and denser patterns, the 44/.45 variants work MUCH better than the 38/357. I do know, form personal experience, that the 44/45 variants cleanly take squirrels and birds at 25 feet. However, the little 357 caps usually will not reliably anchor a ruffed grouse beyond much more than 10 or 12 feet. Too little shot spread over too large and area, resulting in some damned big holes in the 'pattern'.

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:38:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By photokirk:
They are great for their intended purpose. However, I keep encountering folks who thinks it's a good idea to load them in a carry weapon. The reasoning is usally, "It'll let them know I mean business without killing them."



You are so right.

I have actually had a couple of folks contact me through www.theboxotruth.com/index.htm to ask me the same thing. "Would it be a good idea to carry shotshells in my handgun to give the bad guy a "warning"?"

The answer is, of course, No.

The only reason for shooting a bad guy is to STOP him from doing whatever he is doing that places us in fear of our life. Nothing else.

A shotshell would only slightly wound a bad guy and probably cause him to become enraged. If shot in the face, it might cause blindness, but I'd sure hate to explain to a jury why I blinded a bad guy, instead of trying to Stop him.

Shotshells are for snakes and small rodents. Modern JHPs are for bad guys.
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