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Posted: 2/12/2006 6:28:49 PM EDT
Hmmm..........I think that al wants to head the aclu, clinton wants to head the un

Gore Laments U.S. 'Abuses' Against Arabs
JIM KRANE
Associated Press Writer
February 12, 2006
www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-saudi-gore,0,2692018.story?coll=sns-ap-nationworld-headlines
JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia -- Former Vice President Al Gore told a mainly Saudi audience on Sunday that the U.S. government committed "terrible abuses" against Arabs after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, and that most Americans did not support such treatment.

Gore said Arabs had been "indiscriminately rounded up" and held in "unforgivable" conditions. The former vice president said the Bush administration was playing into al-Qaida's hands by routinely blocking Saudi visa applications.

"The thoughtless way in which visas are now handled, that is a mistake," Gore said during the Jiddah Economic Forum. "The worst thing we can possibly do is to cut off the channels of friendship and mutual understanding between Saudi Arabia and the United States."

Gore told the largely Saudi audience, many of them educated at U.S. universities, that Arabs in the United States had been "indiscriminately rounded up, often on minor charges of overstaying a visa or not having a green card in proper order, and held in conditions that were just unforgivable."

"Unfortunately there have been terrible abuses and it's wrong," Gore said. "I do want you to know that it does not represent the desires or wishes or feelings of the majority of the citizens of my country."

On Iran, Gore complained of "endemic hyper-corruption" among Tehran's religious and political elite and asked Arabs to take a stand against Iran's nuclear program.

Iran says its program is for peaceful purposes but the United States and other Western countries suspect Tehran is trying to develop nuclear weapons.

"Is it only for the West to say this is dangerous?" Gore asked. "We should have more people in this region saying this is dangerous."

Several audience members criticized the United States for what they described as "unconditional" U.S. support for Israel, saying U.S. diplomats helped Israel flout U.N. resolutions that they enforced when the measures targeted Arabs.

Gore refused to be drawn into questions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

"We can't solve that long conflict in exchanges here," Gore said.

Also at the forum, the vice chairman of Chevron Corp., Peter Robertson, said President Bush's desire to cut U.S. dependence on Mideast oil shows a "misunderstanding" of global energy supply and the critical role of Saudi Arabia.

In his State of the Union address this month, Bush pledged to cut U.S. dependence on Middle East oil by 75 percent by 2025.

"This notion of being energy independent is completely unreasonable," Robertson said at the economic forum, which opened Saturday.

"I believe Middle Eastern oil can and must play a certain role in the system," Robertson said. "Saudi Arabia's massive resources will continue to promote international energy security and serve as a moderating force in balancing supply and demand."

Cherie Blair, wife of British Prime Minister Tony Blair, made a plea at the forum for women's rights, telling Saudi leaders that the dearth of women in the work force was "undermining economic potential" of the kingdom.

Irish President Mary McAleese urged Saudi Arabia to learn from Ireland's economic transformation, which hinged on opening the country to the outside world and ushering women into the workplace.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:29:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:30:54 PM EDT
Zaphod laments that Al Gore is still breathing.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:31:42 PM EDT

"Is it only for the West to say this is dangerous?" Gore asked. "We should have more people in this region saying this is dangerous."


I did FINALLY agree with SOMETHING that he said
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:32:06 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:33:44 PM EDT
I honestly dont know what to say.


Should be shot for treason?
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:38:35 PM EDT
Any Arab still breathing has nothing to complain about.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:41:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:

Should be shot for treason?




Basic stupidity.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:44:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 50cal:
I am sorry to say that ol' Al is a fellow Tennessean. Sorry USofA for that one.



That's OK- TN made up for it by not voting for him in 2000.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:45:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 22bad [-- Gore said. "I do want you to know that it does not represent the desires or wishes or feelings of the majority of the citizens of my country."
.



I think he has shown that he has no idea what the majority of the voters of this country desire.

rj

Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:19:14 PM EDT
guess he is going to follow in jimmy "i never met a dictator i didn't blow" carter's footsteps

Gore's Remarks in Saudi Arabia Draw Strong Criticism
Patrick Goodenough
CNSNews.com International Editor
February 14, 2006
www.cnsnews.com/news/viewstory.asp?Page=%5CPolitics%5Carchive%5C200602%5CPOL20060214a.html
(CNSNews.com) - A speech in which former Vice President Al Gore told a mostly Saudi audience that the U.S. had committed "terrible abuses" against Arabs after 9/11 continues to make waves, with critics calling the remarks disloyal and "inappropriate during a time of war."

Some also challenged Gore's reported assertion that "thoughtless" U.S. visa policies towards Arabs were playing into al Qaeda's hands. The most serious questions, however, involved Gore's decision to criticize his country's policies while abroad -- at a time when Muslim feelings against the West are running high. (Gee, kinda seems like his comments about US mistreatment of muslims is playing into al qaeda's hands too)

Addressing the Jeddah Economic Forum, Gore said Sunday that after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, Arabs in America had been "indiscriminately rounded up, often on minor charges of overstaying a visa or not having a green card in proper order, and held in conditions that were just unforgivable."

Gore told his audience, "I do want you to know that it does not represent the desires or wishes or feelings of the majority of the citizens of my country."

In a statement, the National Association of Chiefs of Police accused Gore of having "crossed the line of diplomatic decency by denigrating his own country within the Islamic world."

It said if he had evidence of "terrible abuses" he should put it before the Department of Justice or Congress.

The body also called the comments "shrill," "loathsome" and "ugly," and said they should be condemned by Republicans, Democrats and Independents alike.

"What possesses a former vice president of the U.S. to travel to the birthplace of Islamist terrorism and denounce his country?" asked the website Investors.com in an editorial.

"Unhinged by the 2000 electoral debacle, he has forgotten the meaning of 'loyal opposition,'" it concluded. "Now his only entitlement is disgrace."

Terence Jeffrey, editor of Human Events magazine, questioned Gore's statements criticizing post-9/11 visa policy, given the conclusions of the 9/11 commission that the hijackers - 15 of whom were Saudis - had taken advantage of weak immigration and law enforcement in the U.S.

Conservative bloggers also weighed in, calling Gore's remarks repugnant, insidious - even treasonous - and a debate is raging on Al Gore website discussion forums.

Many critics noted that Gore was making the comments in a country characterized by an absence of democracy, religious freedom violations, and second-class status for women

Irish President Mary McAleese and Cherie Blair, wife of British Prime Minister Tony Blair, both also addressed the forum, speaking in a venue in which men and women were physically separated from each other. They called for women's participation in Saudi Arabia's political and economic life.

The three-day forum, now in its seventh year, has become a major event on the kingdom's calendar, and is sometimes nicknamed the Middle East Doha.

Previous keynote speakers have included former President Clinton, whose 2002 appearance netted him a $300,000 fee, according to the campaign finance website PoliticalMoneyOnline. Clinton returned in 2004.

Former President George H.W. Bush and his businessman son, Neil Bush, have also participated in past forums. Other visitors this year included former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroder and Forbes Inc. president Steve Forbes.

According to the forum website, the Saudi Binladin Group - the Jeddah-based construction firm owned by Osama bin Laden's family - has been a key sponsor, listed in that capacity for this year's event as well as those in 2004 and 2002.

The company, which employs 35,000 people, has distanced itself from the al-Qaeda leader.
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:25:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Former Vice President Al Gore






His 15 minutes of fame has long since expired. Ignore him & he'll go away.
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:26:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 50cal:
I am sorry to say that ol' Al is a fellow Tennessean. Sorry USofA for that one.




A) You have FL on your avtar.

B) He grew up in DC, not TN. He never once went to a TN school. Ever.
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:30:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Former Vice President Al Gore



His 15 minutes of fame has long since expired. Ignore him & he'll go away.



He just went to the birthplace of "radical islam" and told them that America has grievously harmed their brethren

Remember when newsweek printed the incorrect story about koran disrespect in Guantanamo?

There is only one reason for him to do this, to incite the "radical islam" terrorists INTENTIONALLY
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:38:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/14/2006 4:38:49 PM EDT by SandyMush]

Originally Posted By 50cal:
I am sorry to say that ol' Al is an idiot a fellow Tennessean. Sorry USofA for that one.



Fixed

SM
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:42:38 PM EDT
roboman, nice pic.......
But something is missing....
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