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Posted: 2/9/2006 11:37:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 11:41:20 PM EDT
Cant see video, damned Zone alarm...Read description though on teh page.



Actually, yes that is possible for water to go into the air and come back down frozen. I was watching the Weather Channel late one night years ago when International Falls, MN was under a CRIPPLING cold wave and set a record for -60*F. The weather guy had a steaming cup of coffee in his hand, and to "prove how cold it was" threw it up in the air (coffee, not cup). It came back down as Coffee Snow. Not a drop remained "wet", it froze instantaneously.

My exact words: "Fuck."
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 11:41:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 11:42:56 PM EDT by twonami]
YES!
I did it the first time it hit -25F and living in MN, I always heard about it and tried it.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 11:42:35 PM EDT
WOW!!! Thats freaking cool then.....
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 11:45:41 PM EDT
It also gets so cold you eye can actually freeze in your head.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 11:49:01 PM EDT
Yes... I've seen it with my own two eyes.


Don't believe me...
Just ask some of the members here that live up in Fairbanks.
~Dg84
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 12:55:35 AM EDT
Couldn't that be a cup of CO2?

Not denying it could happen that way though, I know I sure as shit wouldn't want to live where it gets that cold on a regular basis.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:07:40 AM EDT
Years ago I was working at a commercial property and we had a freeze one night and nobody remembered to turn off the irrigation system. When the sprinklers came on, they just sprayed freezing water that coated everything in ice. There was even a couple of frozen streams of water suspended from the trees. Had 18 trees die and thousands of dollars of other lanscaping damage.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:14:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Lon_Moer:
Years ago I was working at a commercial property and we had a freeze one night and nobody remembered to turn off the irrigation system. When the sprinklers came on, they just sprayed freezing water that coated everything in ice. There was even a couple of frozen streams of water suspended from the trees. Had 18 trees die and thousands of dollars of other lanscaping damage.




oops.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:33:46 AM EDT
I remember seeing that in Newport, RI. Not as dramatic (it didn't ALL freeze), but some of it sure did.

Surprised those folks didn't get frostbite just stepping outside.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:37:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/10/2006 2:39:58 AM EDT by Sub-MOA]
The water in that cup is actually boiling…

At about -30 the water looses enough heat fast enough in the vapor phase (in the air as steam) to freeze before hitting the ground.

What you are actually seeing is water boiling off in mid-air and then the vapor cloud blowing away.


<eta>
I was watching some National Geographic show on North Pole exploration. The guy grinned at the camera and laughed.

After laughing, the guy sucked in a big lung full of cold air. The shock temperature change was enough to make his two front teeth shatter like glass.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:45:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Sub-MOA:
I was watching some National Geographic show on North Pole exploration. The guy grinned at the camera and laughed.

After laughing, the guy sucked in a big lung full of cold air. The shock temperature change was enough to make his two front teeth shatter like glass.



Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:25:26 AM EDT
I've blown bubbles in weather that cold. The bubbles would freeze in the air. If you caught one in your glove, the bubble wouldn't pop. The bottom of it would just crinkle, and the rest would sit there like a glass ball with a very, very thin shell. It was cool looking.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:26:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:29:15 AM EDT
tag to see at home
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:36:43 AM EDT
I've seen it where the waves along the shore of Lake Erie have frozen in place. I'm sure it was in phases, and didn't happen instantaneously, however.

Not this year, though. It hasn't been that cold.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:42:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Sub-MOA:
The water in that cup is actually boiling…

At about -30 the water looses enough heat fast enough in the vapor phase (in the air as steam) to freeze before hitting the ground.

What you are actually seeing is water boiling off in mid-air and then the vapor cloud blowing away.


<eta>
I was watching some National Geographic show on North Pole exploration. The guy grinned at the camera and laughed.

After laughing, the guy sucked in a big lung full of cold air. The shock temperature change was enough to make his two front teeth shatter like glass.





Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:50:23 AM EDT
Was up there camping in that cold many years ago. It was so cold that we had to stand over the fire and talk to each other becuase if we didn't the words would freeze in mid-air and you couldn't hear what the other person was saying.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:55:28 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:55:48 AM EDT
mmmmmmm sublimation.......



Yes, it is real...its how ski hills make this stuff called "snow" with their big machines.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:56:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By widmn:
Was up there camping in that cold many years ago. It was so cold that we had to stand over the fire and talk to each other becuase if we didn't the words would freeze in mid-air and you couldn't hear what the other person was saying.



Ya, and when it thaws in the spring the sound is so loud that people stay inside waiting for all the frozen words to thaw out.......

Uff da!
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 4:17:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Princeton:
Couldn't that be a cup of CO2?

Not denying it could happen that way though, I know I sure as shit wouldn't want to live where it gets that cold on a regular basis.



CO2 doesn't have a liquid phase at normal atmospheric pressure. If he had a cup of CO2, it's be a block of dry ice. Not so interesting to watch.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 4:29:12 AM EDT
wow
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 4:33:04 AM EDT
its fun living in a area that has a temp range of -30 to +105

Link Posted: 2/10/2006 5:17:10 AM EDT
Pal of mine was stationed on Rat Island. It was so cold, when he went to take a tinkle, his silicone nut in his sack shattered. Need I mention all the stars he saw?

Link Posted: 2/10/2006 5:19:30 AM EDT
Yet another thing I never want to witness.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 5:23:21 AM EDT
Yup,it's real. When I lived in Wyoming,the cold was BRUTAL!! People froze to death and it was pretty bad.
I was in high school and for some reason they ran out of fuel to keep the heaters going. They called school for the day and within 10 minutes,you could see your breath in the halls. So from 70 or so degrees to mid 40's in 10 minutes.
Well, they called the buses and I missed mine. I wlaked about 1/2 mile to a friends place and thought I was going to lose my toes and fingers to frost bite. I got inside and it took 20 or so minutes for the feeling to come back into my toes and fingers. It was awful!!!
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 5:24:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By StariVojnik:
Pal of mine was stationed on Rat Island. It was so cold, when he went to take a tinkle, his silicone nut in his sack shattered. Need I mention all the stars he saw?




Link Posted: 2/10/2006 5:24:27 AM EDT
I used to Snowmobile in the Adirondacks. Took friends down to overnight in an unisulated huntcamp. It was a frostyn -42F...

Everything frozen damn near instantly. I can also say, with complete confidence, that the ladies do not dawdle while in the outhouse!
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 12:29:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By doorgunner84:
Don't believe me...
Just ask some of the members here that live up in Fairbanks.
~Dg84


I heard they created a room-temperature superconductor at U of Alaska Fairbanks this year.

Clearly global warming is a threat to our scientific progress.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 1:29:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cleatus:
mmmmmmm sublimation.......

Yes, it is real...its how ski hills make this stuff called "snow" with their big machines.



I thought sublimation was solid----->vapor/gas skipping right over the 'liquid' stage. Liquid---->vapor/gas is evaporation, no?
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 1:38:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By legalese77:

Originally Posted By Cleatus:
mmmmmmm sublimation.......

Yes, it is real...its how ski hills make this stuff called "snow" with their big machines.



I thought sublimation was solid----->vapor/gas skipping right over the 'liquid' stage. Liquid---->vapor/gas is evaporation, no?




yup. sublimation is solid/gas transition. Evaporation is liquid/gas transition.


Link Posted: 2/10/2006 1:41:02 PM EDT
Forecasted overnight temperatures for Winnipeg Manitoba for Feb 17th, -9deg F


Link Posted: 2/10/2006 1:41:05 PM EDT
Due to the current global warming trend, the winters here aren't nearly as cold as they were when I was a kid. I remember one time we built a fire outside in the winter, and it was so cold that we had to bring it indoors to thaw it out by the fireplace.

Back in those days we had no indoor plumbing, and all we had was an outhouse. That winter it snowed and snowed so much that eventually we couldn't open the door to go outside. We ended up having to shit in the shotgun and shoot it out the chimney.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 1:56:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By widmn:
Was up there camping in that cold many years ago. It was so cold that we had to stand over the fire and talk to each other becuase if we didn't the words would freeze in mid-air and you couldn't hear what the other person was saying.




Baron Munchausen?
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:01:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lord_Grey_Boots:
Forecasted overnight temperatures for Winnipeg Manitoba for Feb 17th, -9deg F





That's freaking balmy.

SBG
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:03:21 PM EDT
It didn't all freeze. Look at the side of his house before and after. Pretty cool to watch though, thanks for the vid.

BTW that guy looks like Mikey on American Chopper.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:11:29 PM EDT
The process is called sublimation, going from the solid phase to the gaseous phase w/o ever being liquid. So long as the temperautre and pressure are at the correct balance, water will sublimate just fine. Look inside your frost free freezer some time. It has more to do with the partial (vapor) pressure of water at the temperature you find the solid/gas.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:12:02 PM EDT
The other night our AC went haywire and brought the inside temp in our house down to like 68 F. Boy was that cold. Thank heaven for cotton blankets. Whew.

Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:13:24 PM EDT
Yep.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:23:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/10/2006 2:23:57 PM EDT by legalese77]

Originally Posted By Warrior-Poet:
The process is called sublimation, going from the solid phase to the gaseous phase w/o ever being liquid. So long as the temperautre and pressure are at the correct balance, water will sublimate just fine. Look inside your frost free freezer some time. It has more to do with the partial (vapor) pressure of water at the temperature you find the solid/gas.



Wait a minute. You describe sublimation as "going from the solid phase to the gaseous phase w/o ever being liquid" but then remark that "water will sublimate just fine". Am I missing something? I thought water was a liquid. How does a liquid sublimate? I thought it evaporated.

I guess I should have paid more attention in organic chemistry
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:27:25 PM EDT
thats a pretty neat video.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:37:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MoparMike:

Actually, yes that is possible for water to go into the air and come back down frozen. I was watching the Weather Channel late one night years ago when International Falls, MN was under a CRIPPLING cold wave and set a record for -60*F. The weather guy had a steaming cup of coffee in his hand, and to "prove how cold it was" threw it up in the air (coffee, not cup). It came back down as Coffee Snow. Not a drop remained "wet", it froze instantaneously.

My exact words: "Fuck."



I was camping that night.

It was a bit chilly

GM
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 2:43:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By StariVojnik:
Pal of mine was stationed on Rat Island. It was so cold, when he went to take a tinkle, his silicone nut in his sack shattered. Need I mention all the stars he saw?




I am so glad I did not go with the fake testicle.
Runnin' a standard missing man formation.....



and yes - that water in the air trick can work...ski hill which was mentioned.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 7:30:43 PM EDT
I've done that with hot coffee when it was -58F standing temp. Interesting to see...
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 7:43:46 PM EDT
I'll bet it can... and I'll bet that I never want to be anywhere where it's that cold!

Speaking of which, it looks like the guy who threw the water was only wearing a shirt and overalls. Isn't he COLD?!?
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 7:54:44 PM EDT


Wait a minute. You describe sublimation as "going from the solid phase to the gaseous phase w/o ever being liquid" but then remark that "water will sublimate just fine". Am I missing something? I thought water was a liquid. How does a liquid sublimate? I thought it evaporated.

I guess I should have paid more attention in organic chemistry



Good point.

I am also wondering what happens to car tires at that temperature. How cold can they get before they shatter? Not to mention loosing so much air pressure because colder air takes up less space.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 8:00:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Warrior-Poet:
The process is called sublimation, going from the solid phase to the gaseous phase w/o ever being liquid. So long as the temperautre and pressure are at the correct balance, water will sublimate just fine. Look inside your frost free freezer some time. It has more to do with the partial (vapor) pressure of water at the temperature you find the solid/gas.



Liquid wont sublimate......the best example I can give you of sublimation is frost on your car.......it goes from a gas to a solid.......

Link Posted: 2/10/2006 8:10:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ENGLT:
I am also wondering what happens to car tires at that temperature. How cold can they get before they shatter? Not to mention loosing so much air pressure because colder air takes up less space.



If you leave your car outside up in Fairbanks during a cold spell the car tires will form "flat spots." Once they warm up during driving the flat spots will go away.

I live in Anchorage, and I dont' see how anybody lives in Fairbanks.
~Dg84
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 8:23:55 PM EDT
Oh yeah, the flat spots on tires. I hate that.

A couple winters ago it got pretty cold here NE of Fairbanks. That is a neat trick - throwing a cup of coffee up in the air, hearing the "thhooomp" as it freezes in mid air, leaving an ice cloud and ice/water falling to the ground.

Another guy saw a mouse (vole) run onto a truck tire track in the foot deep snow, make a couple circles, and freeze solid reaaaally quick.

Just too cold to work. You break tools and vehicles faster than the shop can patch them up.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 8:25:33 PM EDT
I grew up in MN and have done this myself.

My mom and I were watching the news and the weather guy did this same thing with a cup of coffee. So when the news was over my mom and I took two cups of coffee outside to see if it would really happen. It was -45 F outside and when we thru the coffee into the air, poof, big cloud of ice/vapor. Cool as shit.


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