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Posted: 2/9/2006 9:06:20 PM EDT
Arizona is not the only state that is attempting to legislate or just promise to legislate solutions the the problems with illegals
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:08:16 PM EDT
Legislator Looks To Crack Down On Illegal Immigration
February 9, 2006
www.channeloklahoma.com/news/6884638/detail.html
OKLAHOMA CITY -- There's a new push to crack down on illegal immigration right here in
Oklahoma.

Leaders in the Hispanic community and several Oklahoma legislators said they believe the federal government is not doing enough to control illegal immigration. However, the solution to the problem is where the Hispanic community doesn't see eye to eye with lawmakers.

When it comes to illegal immigration, Isabel Chancellor often hears only negative.


"The cost of providing the services is too high, and they want to do away with that, and why should we provide services?" she said.

Although Chancellor believes the costs are high, she said there are benefits to illegal immigration.

"(Illegal immigrants) work in the hog farms, in agriculture obviously, in the hotel industry, so they impact the economy," Chancellor said.

Chancellor owns a business and belongs to the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. She said she's frustrated with how Oklahoma legislators want to fix illegal immigration. One plan is called the Oklahoma Taxpayer Citizen Protection Act, which would require proof of citizenship.

"Everybody asks, 'Well, why is the state of Oklahoma doing this because border enforcement is a federal responsibility,' and I agree with that but the bottom line is the federal government is not fulfilling its duty to protect our nation's borders," said Oklahoma state Rep. Randy Terrill.

Chancellor said that although nobody likes illegal immigration in and of itself, it's still a federal issue and should be handled at the federal level. She noted that she does not believe federal laws have been working.

That's why Terrill wants the state of Oklahoma to step in.

"So, if federal government won't act then I think that we all believe the state must," he said.

Chancellor said she would support a guest-worker program; however, before lawmakers act, she recommended that legislators gather input from the Hispanic community. She said she plans to meet with Terrill on Friday.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:08:30 PM EDT
You are all racists!!!

It's about time.
I think come closer to election time, douchebags in office are starting to pay attention to what people want.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:32:16 PM EDT
Illegal immigrant legislation introduced
Jim Tharpe
February 9, 2006
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
www.ajc.com/blogs/content/shared-blogs/ajc/georgia/entries/2006/02/09/illegal_immigra_1.html
Legislation to crack down on illegal immigrants in Georgia — and businesses that hire them — was introduced today in the state Senate, setting the stage for a heated debate in coming weeks at the state Legislature.

State Sen. Chip Rogers (R-Woodstock) introduced the Georgia Security & Immigration Compliance Act (Senate Bill 529), which would:

Prohibit compensation to illegal immigrants to be declared a deductible business expense

Require that any publicly funded contract include language prohibiting the contractor or subcontractor from knowingly hiring someone in violation of federal immigration law

Require verification of eligibility for adult applicants for public benefits.

Set tough new penalties for human trafficking

Estimates on the number of illegal immigrants in Georgia range from 250,000 to 800,000. Proponents of a crackdown say illegals sap resources from state programs and take jobs from legal residents. Critics of the proposals say illegals take jobs that nobody else wants and help underpin the economy while having a minimal impact on public programs.

Rogers has said his bill is an attempt to begin a dialogue on illegal immigration, which is expected to be one of the hot-button issues this year at the General Assembly.

“Any person that compensates another person $600 or more during the year would have to receive from that person some documented evidence that they are here legally,” Rogers said. ” If they don’t, they cannot declare what they’ve paid them as a legitimate business expense. “If you were to hire someone to do landscaping and you paid them $200 that obviously would not be included in this .”

Rogers said he used the $600 figure because that is the trigger for employers filing a Form 1099.

In an earlier version of the bill, Rogers had proposed that employers be required to verify the legal status of their employees. However, he backed away from that idea after complaints from the business community and advice from immigration lawyers who said it would not withstand court scrutiny.

Under SB 529, the Department of Revenue would be responsible for enforcement of the compensation portion of the bill.The bill instructs the revenue commissioner to “promulgate rules and regulations deemed necessary” to administer the compensation portion of the bill.

“We want to make sure employers do not get a tax benefit for hiring someone illegally,” Rogers said.

The bill has been assigned to committee, and debate on the issue is not expected for a week or so.

“I want to give the other side time to bring in any witnesses they want,” Rogers said. “So we probably won’t have hearings on this for a week to 10 days. We want to make sure that anybody who wants to speak on this has the opportunity to be here.”

Rogers has worked with State Sen. Sam Zamarippa (D-Atlanta) on the bill. Zamarripa, however, has said the thinks any solution to the illegal immigration problem should come from the federal, not the state level. Zamarripa chairs the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials.

On Sunday afternoon, groups on both sides of the issue are planning demonstrations at the state Capitol. A group called Coalition for a New Georgia, organized by the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials, is holding a 2 p.m. rally in support of “real immigration reform.” In response, the Dustin Inman Society, an anti-illegal immigration group headed by Cobb County resident D.A. King, announced its own plans to “protest violation of immigration and employment laws” at 1:30 p.m.

— Staff writer Carlos Campos contributed to this article
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:34:12 PM EDT
Democrats target illegal immigration
Measure would hold employers accountable
02/09/2006
The Gazette
www.crgazette.com/2006/02/09/Home/democratsillegalimmigration.htm
DES MOINES, IOWA - Legislative Democrats today are calling for steps to curb illegal immigration by holding corporate executives and employees accountable for hiring undocumented workers in Iowa.

A proposal backed by Democrats in the House and Senate seeks to impose fines and possible jail time for corporate leaders engage in unfair business practices aimed at exploiting cheap labor.

The legislative package also would outlaw human trafficking, provide whistle-blower protections to employees who expose the hiring of undocumented workers, and establish an employer accountability bureau in the Iowa Attorney General's office to probe companies suspected of hiring undocumented workers.

Legislative Democrats also are seeking to shut off state assistance, economic development grants or tax cuts to corporations proven to have hired illegal, undocumented workers.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:36:50 PM EDT
7 bills target illegal immigration
They include cutting social services
February 09, 2006
KELLI HEWETT TAYLOR
News staff writer
www.al.com/news/birminghamnews/index.ssf?/base/news/1139480608229840.xml&coll=2
The state Legislature is set to consider at least seven bills targeting illegal immigration this session, including employer verification of workers, reductions in social services and some private property seizure.

"It has been a gradual buildup - the federal government's failure to do anything that has put the states in a horrible mess," said state Rep. Randy Hinshaw, D-Madison. "People want the issue solved."

Hinshaw is sponsoring a state bill to limit nonemergency government services to illegal immigrants to reduce the tax costs.

State "legislation that looks at removing people's property or taking away access to services is not going to get at the core of the problem, which is immigration reform," said Isabel Rubio, executive director of the Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama. "I think you do run the risk of beginning to single people out for ethnicity."

Illegal immigration concerns have increased in Alabama this year because of national media attention, increasing traffic accidents and crimes involving illegal immigrants, Hinshaw said.

Sen. E.B. McClain, D-Midfield, is sponsoring a bill to penalize employers who don't verify their employees' legal status with the federal government.

"I think the (illegal immigrant) population is growing so, and it has gotten to the point where some of our constituents feel a little bit threatened," McClain said. "To curb some of this, I think the employer should be the responsible party. The employees are going to get jobs any way they can. It boils down to survival for them."

Rubio agreed, saying employers should be more accountable.

Members of the state chapter of Associated Builders & Contractors, or ABC, whose members are commercial contractors, are showing early support for employer accountability.

"We are consistently for reasonable and responsible immigration procedures and we feel like this one is responsible," said ABC spokesman Jay Reed.

Rep. Lea Fite, D-Anniston, is proposing that employers who don't verify employee status would be guilty of an unfair trade practice if a U.S. worker or legal worker were discharged while employing an illegal worker.

Rep. Micky Hammon, R-Decatur, has filed a package of bills dealing with illegal immigration.

"As a state, we cannot stand idly by and watch this tidal wave of illegal aliens pour into the region," Hammon said in a news release. "We must put in strict measures that discourage those who come here illegally from putting down roots.

Hammon's bills include making it a felony for illegal immigrants to register to vote or attempt to vote; a requirement for people applying for public benefits to show proof of citizenship or lawful residence; and authority for law enforcement to seize some personal property from illegal immigrants.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:39:58 PM EDT
Bill tightens requirements for licenses
2-8-06
Associated Press
www.seacoastonline.com/news/02082006/maine/86764.htm
AUGUSTA, Maine - The state Senate on Tuesday gave its final approval to a bill to tighten up Maine’s requirements for issuing drivers licenses and state identification cards to Maine residents who are not United States citizens.
The Senate voted without debate to enact the bill and sent it to Gov. John Baldacci.

If signed into law, it will bar the state from accepting expired visas granted by the United States, expired documents issued by foreign countries and foreign passports showing elapsed departure dates as identification to get drivers’ licenses or state identification cards.

The legislation is not as stringent as federal requirements, but it tightens up Maine’s existing rules.

Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap said the legislation addresses heightened national security concerns while keeping the state out of immigration issues. The legislation has no cost to the state, Dunlap said.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:48:28 PM EDT
I dunno. I kinda think that if they can get their asses all the way to Maine, they might deserve to stay. Provided they don't leave Maine during the winter.

Link Posted: 2/10/2006 7:50:45 AM EDT
"Attempting" is the correct phrase.

The current crop of politicians won't do a damn thing in reality. Any bill they (may) pass with be utterly toothless. This is just window dressing for the media so they can get re-elected.

Bet me.

CMOS
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 9:50:57 PM EDT
Bill on illegals, college tuition goes to Senate
An amendment to the original bill that creates an exemption pushed the proposal through.
By Mason Adams
February 10, 2006
www.roanoke.com/news/roanoke/wb/wb/xp-52038
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA -- Call it the carrot-and-stick effect.

By adding a last-minute amendment, Sen. Emmett Hanger, R-Augusta County, achieved a political coup Thursday by winning praise and a unanimous vote in favor of a Senate bill that previously had been criticized as divisive and xenophobic.

Senate Bill 677 would prevent illegal immigrants from receiving in-state tuition at state colleges. Its chances at passing through the Democrat-controlled Senate Committee on Education and Health were considered slim.

But Hanger then added an amendment providing an exemption for students who, as the children of illegal immigrants, have resided in Virginia for three years, graduated from high school, paid income tax or make too little money to qualify, and can prove they're in the process of applying for citizenship. (Sounds very........amnesty-like)

"I think actually an opportunity emerged here this morning," Hanger said.

"If we adopt this, I think we can make a statement that will require there be an appropriate screening [of students applying to public colleges]. But it also provides some assurances to these children who have been educated in Virginia, who came over with illegal immigrant parents and have not been regularized.

"There is an incentive here for them to become citizens of the United States, and that's what it's all about," Hanger said.

After the amendment was added, the committee voted 15-0 to report the bill to the full Senate floor.

Before Thursday's committee meeting, chances for SB 677's passage looked slim. The Higher Education subcommittee, consisting of two Democrats and two Republicans, including Sen. Brandon Bell, R-Roanoke County, voted unanimously to recommend it be killed. But the last-minute amendment changed the minds not only of all four senators, but two Latino lawyers who'd come to Richmond to criticize the bill.

"We came up here and our objective was to oppose this bill," said Andres Tobar, chairman of the Virginia Coalition of Latino Organizations. "But in light of the amendment ... we're delighted with the step on a bipartisan basis that was taken by the committee today to support this."

Walter Tejada, an Arlington County supervisor, praised Hanger as well.

"We do remain very concerned about the anti-immigrant sentiment that this General Assembly has created with ... legislation that seek to divide communities," Tejada said. "So we particularly applaud Sen. Hanger ... I hope that other legislators pay attention to the kind of leadership being shown here."

Hanger said he got the idea for the amendment after reading that Gov. Tim Kaine would sign the bill if it included such a provision.

While the governor's staff said it would need to take a look at the final version of the bill, it supports the amended version that emerged from the Senate committee.

"It strikes me that this amendment seeks to do what Governor Kaine has been advocating," said Kevin Hall, the governor's spokesman. "And that is seeking to find an appropriate balance so the children of undocumented workers are not singled out and denied opportunities here in the commonwealth."

The trick will be ensuring the amended SB 677 remains intact on the Senate floor, and then in the House. The latter, Hanger said, is likely to be the greater challenge.

The House has already passed two bills that would affect illegal immigrants attempting to go to state colleges:

n HB 1050, which would prohibit public colleges from giving in-state tuition rates to illegal immigrants.

n HB 262, which would prevent illegal or undocumented immigrants from attending state colleges at all.

Hanger told the Senate Committee on Education and Health that if the House strips the amendment from his bill, he'll fight to get it reattached in a conference committee. Otherwise, he said, he'll have the bill killed for the year.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 1:44:46 PM EDT
No PROOF? But, they are going after the people that deal in slavery and forced prostitution anyway?
They have proof, they just don't want to publicly discuss illegal aliens forcing children into prostitution.......not pc

Connecticut spotlights modern slavery
By ADAM BOWLES
Norwich Bulletin
www.norwichbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060126/NEWS01/601260303/1002

HARTFORD -- They have few cases to prove their fears, but state leaders are convinced human traffickers are working underground to enslave people for work or sex in Connecticut.

And state Senate President Pro Tem Donald Williams Jr., D-Brooklyn, said the rising immigrant population -- a trend in southeastern Connecticut -- is especially vulnerable to such exploitation.

"We're talking about an issue of human rights, an issue of civil rights and an issue that may not be on the radar screen of Connecticut," he said.

But the issue was brought into the spotlight Monday at the State Capitol, where the Interagency Task Force on Trafficking in Persons issued a report for the General Assembly on a relatively unknown form of modern-day slavery.

"We are talking about young women and children brought to this country under false pretenses, living in slave-like conditions and being mistreated and doing things they never thought they would do," state Sen. Andrea Stillman, D-Waterford, said.

Stillman led the task force in making six recommendations to combat the problem:


Enact a state anti-trafficking statute imposing civil and criminal penalties.

Increase public awareness.

Provide money to providers who assist victims with such services as high-security shelter and reintegration assistance, and to set up a statewide hotline.

Train law enforcement and social service providers to recognize the problem, including the idea that some prostitutes actually may be victims.

Require state and local law enforcement agencies to collect and report data on human trafficking cases.

Keep the task force active.
Rui Shan Hu, who moved to Norwich from China four years ago, has heard first-hand of illegal immigrants who arrive in the United States only to face long, harsh working conditions.

"They want to go back home," said Hu, a 20-year-old student at the University of Connecticut and a part-time worker at Mohegan Sun.

The Rev. Frank Rouleau, of the Haitian Apostolate at St. Mary Church in Norwich, agreed immigrants often are taken advantage of by money-hungry people.

They also typically fear asking public officials for help because of their experience with oppressive governments in their native countries, he said.

The report, citing U.S. Department of State statistics, estimated between 14,500 and 17,500 people are trafficked into the country each year.

Human trafficking cases have been rare in Connecticut, although in 2004, two Rwandans living in Meriden pleaded guilty to child smuggling charges.

But the report showed the state may appeal to traffickers because it has two interstate highways between Boston and New York City -- cities known as prime trafficking destinations -- an international airport -- Bradley in Windsor Locks -- and three seaports on Long Island Sound.

U.S. Attorney Kevin O'Connor of the Connecticut District said a recent $500,000 federal grant to a separate federal and state task force will help train local and state police officers to identify such cases.

"We will continue to shake the tree," he said. "We truly hope we don't find the worst-case scenario like we do in other parts of the country, but we are in much better shape of finding out."

Another $500,000 federal grant was awarded last month to the International Institute of Connecticut for victim support services.

The agency already is concerned about immigrant needs in Norwich, where the institute's John Weiss has been meeting with immigrants to discuss various legal problems.

"For the traffickers out there, beware," said state Rep. James Amann, D-Milford, speaker of the House of Representatives. "We're taking this issue seriously. We're coming after you."
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 1:50:01 PM EDT
Let vagrants and homeless and illegals come into your house and use your resources and destroy your property commit crime upon your family and make sure you don't criticize any of them if they are of some ethnic minority...take all your hard earned savings and give them health care and food and a monthy income...vouch for them so they can get a driver's license and if they do want to work, give them the job your wife and kids are doing so your own family can be out of work...
no complaints now...
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:12:15 PM EDT
They will probably just lessen the rights of Law Abiding citizens and do nothing to stop Illegal immigration
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:14:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NonConformist:
They will probably just lessen the rights of Law Abiding citizens and do nothing to stop Illegal immigration



Naaa Baaa that would not happen [/sheeple]
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:18:12 PM EDT
I would agree with you 22. But the last time I did that I got called a racist.


I do agree with you though. In a non-racist sort of way.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:18:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JLH3:
I dunno. I kinda think that if they can get their asses all the way to Maine, they might deserve to stay. Provided they don't leave Maine during the winter.




I have to admit it keeps out a lot of the 'undesirables' ie. people who are lazy and want to suck the .gov teet. People complain bitterly of the lack of 'social programs' in NH.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:20:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KyBlaster:
I would agree with you 22. But the last time I did that I got called a racist.


I do agree with you though. In a non-racist sort of way.



I have actually had several people here tell me that in IMs
seems that playing the race card does have a "chilling effect"

Link Posted: 2/12/2006 9:42:36 PM EDT
Seriously, if a wall won't work why are the illegals against it?

Latinos discuss rights at Riverside immigration summit
Proposals in Costa Mesa and D.C. criticized in Riverside.
February 12, 2006
COURTNEY PERKES
The Orange County Register
www.ocregister.com/ocregister/news/abox/article_995915.php
RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA – About 400 Latinos concerned about the rights of immigrants who enter the country illegally(?) to work met Saturday in Riverside to fight plans for increased enforcement from Washington and Costa Mesa.

The Mexicano/Latino Leadership Immigration Summit focused mostly on legislation approved in the House of Representatives that would build a fence along parts of the Mexican border.

"We're not terrorists, just hardworking people trying to make a living," said speaker Hector Preciado of the Greenlining Institute, a Northern California public policy and advocacy group.

Participants also mentioned Costa Mesa's decision to allow police to enforce some federal immigration laws and seek deportation of felony suspects. The Orange County Sheriff's Department is working on a similar proposal.

Zeke Hernandez of the Santa Ana chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens asked for support of an April 1 demonstration in front of City Hall.

"Take a look at what's happening in Orange County - the birthplace of Save Our State (Prop. 187) and the Minutemen," Hernandez said.

Costa Mesa Mayor Allan Mansoor said he questioned why leaders of the upcoming protest don't want laws enforced.

"There's been tremendous support across the board from people of many different nationalities," he said.

Felipe Aguirre, a City Council member from Maywood, said his city has passed an ordinance saying it will defy the federal government if cities are ordered to enforce immigration laws.

"If Costa Mesa can be an anti-immigrant city, we're going to say Maywood is a pro-immigrant city," Aguirre said to applause.

The conference was organized by the National Alliance for Human Rights.
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 3:31:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/14/2006 3:32:32 PM EDT by 22bad]
Georgia planning on illegal alien tax?

House OKs surcharge on wire transfers from illegal immigrants
GREG BLUESTEIN
Associated Press
Feb. 14, 2006
www.ledger-enquirer.com/mld/ledgerenquirer/13870970.htm
ATLANTA, GEORGIA - The House on Tuesday passed the first of a flurry of immigration bills, approving a proposal designed to tack a 5 percent surcharge on wire transfers from illegal immigrants.
The "Illegal Immigrant Fee Act" requires customers to show a pay stub, driver's license or other proof they are in the U.S. legally. Failure to do so would result in the surcharge.
It's the first of several attempts to toughen the state's immigration standards to reach a vote this legislative session. Across the Capitol, state Sen. Chip Rogers is drumming up support for a broader bill that would deny state-administered benefits to adults who cannot show they are legally in the United States.
Opponents from both sides of the aisle tried to delay Tuesday's vote, but Republican leaders seemed intent on passing the bill. House lawmakers approved, 106-60. It now moves to the Senate.
State Rep. Tom Rice, R-Peachtree Corners, said the bill seeks to offset the financial burden of the state's estimated 225,000 illegal immigrants.
"It's the idea of giving these folks, who are hard working, the opportunity to pay back the services they receive but don't pay for right now," said Rice.
Several Republicans warily questioned the intent and impact of the legislation.
State Rep. David Casas, a Lilburn Republican and one of three Hispanics in the Legislature, said the bill would be hard to enforce because few illegal immigrants would be willing to publicly identify themselves. Fellow Republican Austin Scott expressed concern that the proposal is not a long-term solution.
Democrats called for compassion for the migrant workers who help drive the state's economy.
"I can't go to bed at night saying, 'I will not do for the Hispanic community and the Mexicans what was done for the Italian community and the Irish and every other community looking for a better way of life," said state Rep. Al Williams, D-Midway. He added, "All I ask is that we live the code we tell people we live by."
House Majority Leader Jerry Keen of St. Simons sought on Monday to downplay the legislation's focus on illegal immigrants. He said the bill should be viewed as a new source of funding for hospitals to treat the poor and needy because it earmarks funds for indigent care.
A constitutional amendment, however, would be needed to dedicate the funds for indigent care. Without that amendment, Democrat Bob Holmes said, next session's legislative leaders could easily abandon their commitment.
Ultimately, GOP supporters argued that the legislation could help improve the state's security.
State Rep. John Lunsford, a McDonough Republican, pointed out that the bill won't punish students, migrant workers and others who are in Georgia legally.
"This directly pertains to drug dealers, to terrorists and people who practice human trafficking," said Lunsford. "We live in a very generous state, but there are limits to our generosity."
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 11:54:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 22bad:
Illegal immigrant legislation introduced
Jim Tharpe
February 9, 2006
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
www.ajc.com/blogs/content/shared-blogs/ajc/georgia/entries/2006/02/09/illegal_immigra_1.html
Legislation to crack down on illegal immigrants in Georgia — and businesses that hire them — was introduced today in the state Senate, setting the stage for a heated debate in coming weeks at the state Legislature.

State Sen. Chip Rogers (R-Woodstock) introduced the Georgia Security & Immigration Compliance Act (Senate Bill 529), which would:

Prohibit compensation to illegal immigrants to be declared a deductible business expense

Require that any publicly funded contract include language prohibiting the contractor or subcontractor from knowingly hiring someone in violation of federal immigration law

Require verification of eligibility for adult applicants for public benefits.

Set tough new penalties for human trafficking

Estimates on the number of illegal immigrants in Georgia range from 250,000 to 800,000. Proponents of a crackdown say illegals sap resources from state programs and take jobs from legal residents. Critics of the proposals say illegals take jobs that nobody else wants and help underpin the economy while having a minimal impact on public programs.

Rogers has said his bill is an attempt to begin a dialogue on illegal immigration, which is expected to be one of the hot-button issues this year at the General Assembly.

“Any person that compensates another person $600 or more during the year would have to receive from that person some documented evidence that they are here legally,” Rogers said. ” If they don’t, they cannot declare what they’ve paid them as a legitimate business expense. “If you were to hire someone to do landscaping and you paid them $200 that obviously would not be included in this .”

Rogers said he used the $600 figure because that is the trigger for employers filing a Form 1099.

In an earlier version of the bill, Rogers had proposed that employers be required to verify the legal status of their employees. However, he backed away from that idea after complaints from the business community and advice from immigration lawyers who said it would not withstand court scrutiny.

Under SB 529, the Department of Revenue would be responsible for enforcement of the compensation portion of the bill.The bill instructs the revenue commissioner to “promulgate rules and regulations deemed necessary” to administer the compensation portion of the bill.

“We want to make sure employers do not get a tax benefit for hiring someone illegally,” Rogers said.

The bill has been assigned to committee, and debate on the issue is not expected for a week or so.

“I want to give the other side time to bring in any witnesses they want,” Rogers said. “So we probably won’t have hearings on this for a week to 10 days. We want to make sure that anybody who wants to speak on this has the opportunity to be here.”

Rogers has worked with State Sen. Sam Zamarippa (D-Atlanta) on the bill. Zamarripa, however, has said the thinks any solution to the illegal immigration problem should come from the federal, not the state level. Zamarripa chairs the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials.

On Sunday afternoon, groups on both sides of the issue are planning demonstrations at the state Capitol. A group called Coalition for a New Georgia, organized by the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials, is holding a 2 p.m. rally in support of “real immigration reform.” In response, the Dustin Inman Society, an anti-illegal immigration group headed by Cobb County resident D.A. King, announced its own plans to “protest violation of immigration and employment laws” at 1:30 p.m.

— Staff writer Carlos Campos contributed to this article



Latinos fail to field defense against bills
Community split on response
TERESA BORDEN
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
02/18/06
www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories/0218metlegillegal.html
Midway through this year's legislative session, Georgia Latino leaders are still struggling to come up with a unified response to initiatives aimed at illegal immigrants, bills they see as damaging to all Latinos.

Some have sponsored town hall meetings on immigration and favor working behind the scenes to soften the bills, while others have held rallies at the Capitol. Some want to seek the help of the black and Jewish communities and the businesses that depend on immigrant buying power.

But the fact that Latinos haven't come together means they've lost an opportunity, says Teodoro Maus, the former Mexican consul who has made his home in Sandy Springs.

"It's too late," Maus said. "This should have been done a year ago."

Legislators could begin committee hearings on SB 529, the "Georgia Security and Immigration Compliance Act," next week. The bill, one of many aimed at illegal immigrants, has the backing of Republican leaders. It would deny state benefits and services to adults illegally in the country, penalize employers who hire illegal immigrants, and require public officials to report illegal immigrants to federal authorities. Another bill would charge a tax to those who use money wiring services but can't show proof of legal U.S. residency.

Talk of denying services to illegal immigrants began last year, when Sen. Chip Rogers (R-Woodstock) filed a bill aimed at restricting illegal immigrant access to driver's licenses, medical care, schools and state contract jobs. Some Latino leaders complained, but they did not pull together to craft a response.

Joel Alvarado, a former policy analyst with MALDEF who now works with the Southern Center for Studies in Public Policy at Clark Atlanta University, said some Latinos in Georgia worry about appearing to support illegal immigration. In addition, they are divided by class, country of origin and power-sharing issues, problems that tend to afflict newly established immigrant communities.

"Sometimes we'd be at each other's throats instead of working with each other," he said. "That's true of any type of minority community."

The infighting has exposed rifts and strained friendships.

Jerry Gonzales, president of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials, believes Latinos' best chance of gaining support is through educating the public. To that end, he has been arranging forums at which pro-immigrant activists and those who want stricter limits on immigration state their case.

"Our main goal is to make sure we put good information out there," Gonzales said. But he acknowledged that in many of the forums, audience support for the Latino agenda stands at 50 percent.

The Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, too, is sponsoring its own forums and publishing position papers on the legislation.

Maus, who has worked closely with Gonzales, believes a stronger response from Latinos is needed.

"I'm very bothered with people who are still in the process of analyzing and deliberating," Maus said. "We are in a moment where we have to start to create actions to defend ourselves."

Homero León, a member of the grass-roots Coordinating Council of Latino Community Leaders, recently railed against members of the Georgia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and businesses that cater to Latinos but have expressed support for Rogers.

"Do they want us or not?" said León, referring to such businesses. "They don't want to support us, but they are getting rich because of all the money Hispanics spend in their stores."

Maus believes about the best Latinos in the state can hope for is to remove a few teeth from the immigration bills.

"What we have here is a lack of leadership," he said.

Alvarado and Maus are forging ties with African-Americans and Jews, who they say are ready to come to their aid.

Judy Marx, associate director of the Atlanta chapter of the American Jewish Committee, said the group is ready to lend its expertise in organizing, and hopes in the process to gain an ally.

"We see them as gaining in power and influence," she said. "We are such a tiny minority that we need to find partners anywhere we can."

Edward Dubose, president of the Georgia State Conference of the NAACP, said African-Americans can identify with Latinos and are ready to support them in difficult times.

"Our issues are their issues and their issues are our issues," Dubose said. "We are all racially profiled; we all deal with issues of health care challenges; both communities deal with economic poverty. I can't help but think that an organization as representative as ours has no choice but to embrace the Latino community."

But Maus acknowledged that Latinos here have not known how to communicate what, exactly, they need from these other constituencies.

"People are totally determined to work on our behalf," he said. "They've asked us what we want from them, but we haven't been able to tell them."

Adelina Nicholls, president of the Coordinating Council, said the pending bill might not make much of a difference in enforcing immigration laws, which she says is a federal prerogative. But, she said, the atmosphere of hate it is creating for all Latinos, even those who are legal residents or U.S. citizens, will do real harm.

"It creates xenophobia," she said. "People feel that, at any moment, they can be forced out of their community simply because of the color of their skin or because they speak English with an accent." (ILLEGAL is NOT a RACE, a COLOR or a LANGUAGE)
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 11:56:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KyBlaster:
I would agree with you 22. But the last time I did that I got called a racist.


I do agree with you though. In a non-racist sort of way.



I sort of agree, in a non specific, general way.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 11:58:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 5:46:09 PM EDT
"undocumented workers" are ALREADY criminals

Protesters: Borders Law Makes Migrants Criminals
(CBS4/AP)
Feb 18, 2006
cbs4.com/topstories/local_story_049144318.html
MIAMI-FLORIDA A march through downtown Miami today protested a change in immigration laws which some believes would make criminals out of millions of migrant workers illegals in the country without permission. Busloads of immigrants from Latin America and the Caribbean rallied Saturday against proposed legislation that would require employers to provide information to verify the legal status of its workers.

About 300 people from Colombia, Cuba, Haiti and other countries listened to speeches in Spanish and English, then marched on downtown Miami to protest a proposed federal law that immigration advocates say would criminalize the nation's 11 million undocumented workers illegals.

The Florida Coalition of Immigrants held a news conference Saturday morning to explain the hardship the proposed law will have on people who make the nation’s harvest possible. They voiced opposition against a bill sponsored by House Judiciary Committee Chairman James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., and Homeland Security Committee Chairman Peter King, R-N.Y., that aims to tighten border controls and stop unlawful immigrants illegals from getting jobs.

The most sweeping provision of the House bill would require all employers in the country, more than 7 million, to submit Social Security numbers and other information to a national data base to verify the legal status of workers.

Such a law would affect Florida businesses and workers illegals, especially in the farming industry. Maria Rodriguez, executive director of the Florida Immigrant Coalition, said about 400,000 immigrant farm workers tend and harvest the state's citrus crop, which contributes to a $9 billion citrus industry.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:12:59 PM EDT
Colorado illegals protest passage of laws dealing with them

Immigration Crackdown Proposal Stirs Demonstration
Feb 21, 2006
cbsforDenver.com
Colleen Slevin
Associated Press Writer
cbs4denver.com/local/local_story_052163440.html
(AP) DENVER More than 225 demonstrators rallied at the state Capitol Tuesday to support or denounce a dozen proposals aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration, while lawmakers prepared to open their debate on the contentious issue.

Most of the demonstrators condemned the proposals, which range from sanctions for hiring illegal immigrants to requiring students to identify their country of citizenship.

"We are shocked and angered by the continuous waves of attacks on immigrants," Nita Gonzales, president of Escuela Tlatelolco, a Denver school geared toward Hispanic students.

"We always have been here. We will not go away and we will not be silenced," she said in between demonstrators' chants of "Si, Se Puede" (Yes, it can be done) -- the motto of farm labor organizer Cesar Chavez.


Wanda Weatherford of the Colorado Minutemen said illegal immigrants are crowding Colorado jails and taking teachers' attention away from other students because they cannot speak English.

"We just have to be vigilant. We need to do what we have to do to make our nation safe and secure for our grandchildren," Weatherford said.

She was among about 30 people who gathered in support of the 10 immigration bills up for debate Tuesday, but they weren't allowed to hold a rally because they didn't get a permit.

University of Colorado law professor Clare Harrington, who specializes in immigration and family law, said she doubts any of the proposals would discourage illegal immigration, especially from Mexico, because of the demand for cheap labor in the United States and the lack of economic opportunity in Mexico

"To my mind it's just plugging the finger in the dike. It's not dealing with the underlying problem," said Harrington, who worked on immigration cases in the U.S. Department of Justice.

Earlier this month, lawmakers killed a proposal by Sen. Greg Brophy, R-Wray, that would have barred illegal immigrants from worker compensation insurance benefit.

Brophy said he wanted to discourage businesses from hiring illegal immigrants by making them liable for any injuries they suffer. Democrats said the measure might encourage businesses to hire illegal immigrants because they wouldn't have to pay for worker compensation coverage, and they might gamble that few illegal immigrants would sue.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:15:11 PM EDT
22,

We ought to name you "Minister of Information." Your links are great!

HH
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:18:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HoustonHusker:
22,

We ought to name you "Minister of Information." Your links are great!

HH



You sure won't see many of these articles about illegals on the evening news
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 3:15:50 PM EDT
Looks like the illegals can continue their crime spree

7 immigration bills defeated
KYLE HENLEY
THE GAZETTE
February 22, 2006
www.gazette.com/display.php?id=1314919&secid=1
DENVER - Most of the GOP’s legislative proposals to crack down on illegal immigration in Colorado were turned back at the border Tuesday by Democrats on a House committee.

Members of the House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee defeated seven of 10 Republican-sponsored immigration plans, including three proposals by Rep. Dave Schultheis, R-Colorado Springs.

The bills that were approved by the committee — House Bill 1306 and HB1131 — will be folded in with a handful of proposals from Democratic leaders to make up the General Assembly’s response to the immigration issue. A vote on HB1343 was postponed.

Most of the votes were cast along party lines, with majority Democrats voting against the measures and Republicans voting in favor. The bills defeated included HB1290, which would have required all employers to verify the immigration status of new hires; and HB1082, which would have held employers liable for crimes committed by illegal employees off the clock.

“It makes our job very difficult,” said Jody Randall, who testified against HB1082 as owner of a contracting company that employs more than 1,300 laborers. “How are we supposed to be document experts? If you want to level the playing field, you need to put in place a system where government enforces the law, and not employers.”

The committee heard more than eight hours of emotional testimony and debate on the 10 bills from dozens and dozens of witnesses.

“We are very concerned that no one is enforcing our immigration laws,” said Glen Colton, a member of Northern Coloradans for Immigration Reform. “It is unacceptable that our immigration laws are not being enforced.”

The results of Tuesday’s committee meeting weren’t all that surprising — Democratic House leaders had predicted that only two or three of the Republican immigration bills would advance.

One of the most surprising revelations of the committee meeting, however, was the suggestion by Schultheis,

a budget hawk and ardent anti-tax crusader, that local cities and counties should raise taxes to help pay for the cost of enforcing immigration laws.

The suggestion came while John Patterson, president of the Colorado Association of Chiefs of Police, was testifying that law-enforcement agencies couldn’t afford to take on additional duties enforcing immigration law.

HB1134, by Schultheis, would have required all sheriffs in Colorado to be trained by the federal government to enforce national immigration laws. Patterson argued that the real push for reform needs to come from the federal level.

“Our jails are full, our prisons are full, we have no place to put these people,” he said. “We can pick up illegal aliens all day and all night, transport them to our county jails, but (immigration officials aren’t) doing anything with them.”

Schultheis, who is running for the state Senate in District 9, countered that local communities should step in to address the problem, given the lack of federal leadership. He suggested they raise taxes to pay for more jail space and increased enforcement of immigration laws.

“They would come up with the money if they knew it was going to house these individuals and pay for this service,” he said. “It can be done. We just need to find the resources.”

Before the hearing, hundreds of people gathered outside the Capitol at competing rallies for and against the immigration measures lawmakers were to debate.

Three other bills were supposed to be heard in a Senate committee on Tuesday, but a hearing on those measures was postponed until today because the sponsor of two of the bills, Sen. Tom Wiens, R-Castle Rock, was taken to the hospital complaining of blood clots in his leg.

WHAT GOT THROUGH
Only two of 10 immigration bills made it through the House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee on Tuesday. A vote on one bill was postponed. The bills approved are:
House Bill 1306 — Would require state auditor or an outside auditing firm to determine whether a 2003 law banning cities and counties from issuing identification of any sort to illegal aliens is being enforced.
House Bill 1131 — Would prohibit bail bondsmen from posting bail for a defendant known to be an illegal alien.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 3:27:56 PM EDT
Sadly, the federal gummint "occupies the field" in legal speak, as far as enforcing immigration laws and patrolling the border are concerned. Watch these state laws get struck down as unconstitutional.

But I hope not
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 3:55:17 PM EDT
Pretty much the whole country has gotten a chance to see what illegals do to places they populate

The voters complained so much that legislators are actually pretending to do something about it

But, they are still just pretending, the illegals could be arrested tomorrow, they are already breaking laws
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 4:05:47 PM EDT
easy solution: Create a double fence between the US and Mexico. Authorize anyone to shoot people between the fences. The reason that the illegals continue to pour in here is because they have no reason not to.

If the fear of DEATH is there, then i bet they will turn back quick.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 4:24:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By USAF_Hop_N_Pop:
easy solution: Create a double fence between the US and Mexico. Authorize anyone to shoot people between the fences. The reason that the illegals continue to pour in here is because they have no reason not to.

If the fear of DEATH is there, then i bet they will turn back quick.



There is no way that will\would ever be authorized, in fact, they now have celphones and water stations

And, the illegals have found out that they can just surrender to the BP and they will be fed and released INSIDE the US

The head of the BP testified that they caught half of the two million illegal crossers and released most of them INSIDE the US
(in one year)
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 9:53:56 PM EDT
House panel takes up driver's license bill
Legislation would mandate that immigrants present valid ID
By Kristen Wyatt
The Associated Press
February 21, 2006
www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/politics/bal-bill0221,0,2606551.story?coll=bal-local-headlines
Marylanders would have to prove they're in the country legally to get a driver's license under a bill being considered by the General Assembly.

The bill, sponsored by House members from both parties, would change the licensing rules so that undocumented immigrants illegals would not be eligible for drivers' licenses starting in October. That's about two years sooner than would be required under a new federal law, the Real ID Act.

"I think it's important from a national security standpoint," said Del. Herb McMillan, R-Anne Arundel County, who sponsored the bill.

The question has been considered before by Maryland lawmakers, but immigrant licensing has taken on a new urgency given that Congress last summer said states would eventually have to require proof of legal residency if their drivers' licenses are to be used for federal purposes, such as boarding an airplane.

McMillan said that many states already require proof of legal residency or citizenship. Tennessee is the only state that currently allows undocumented residents to get drivers' certificates that don't also function as federal identifications.

The Maryland bill, heard by a House committee today, brought out about three dozen opponents who wore light yellow T-shirts that read, "Immigrants Build This Country." Opponents testified that Maryland should wait for more details on the federal identification requirements before moving to ban illegal immigrant drivers.

Kim Propeack of Casa de Maryland, an immigrant advocacy group, said that early implementation could hurt even natural-born citizens. She argued that some people don't have birth certificates or passports, especially poor people, and that an illegal immigrant driving ban would be premature.

"I think it's too early," she said.

Lawmakers on the committee seemed interested in setting up a system such as Tennessee's, where undocumented people would be allowed to drive after taking the test, though their identifications wouldn't be the same as a regular driver's license.

"Couldn't we use the next two years to further look at ... ensuring safe streets in Maryland, looking at ways to educate those who are in the country and driving whether they're legal or not?" asked Del. Anthony Brown, D-Prince George's County.

Lawmakers didn't vote on the bill, nor did they decide on another measure related to illegal immigrants and driving. That bill -- sponsored by Republican Del. Richard Impallaria -- would ban undocumented residents from driving and would also set out one-year license suspensions for people who allow illegal immigrants to drive their cars.

The federal Real ID Act was motivated by the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and will eventually require states to adopt uniform standards for licensing. The federal government is supposed to reimburse states for the extra expense of complying with the Real ID Act, though cost estimates for the change vary widely.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 9:46:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/25/2006 9:47:15 PM EDT by 22bad]
Trying to cut illegals off from world of banking
Emelie Rutherford
February 23, 2006
www.dailynewstranscript.com/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=72620
BOSTON -- Emboldened by the defeat of a bill to grant illegal immigrants’ kids tuition breaks, some activists and lawmakers are trying to stop immigrants from using foreign ID cards to do banking in state.

Robert Casimiro, executive director of the Massachusetts Coalition for Immigration Reform, said a bill lawmakers will weigh next month is intended to ban illegal immigrants from Mexico from opening bank accounts with a "matricula consular," a card Mexican consulates issue to Mexican nationals living here.

"It’s just trying to prohibit anything that gives illegal aliens entryway into our processes and procedures," Casimiro said about the bill filed at his request by state Sen. Robert Hedlund, R-Weymouth. "I take exception to a foreign country...signing up illegal immigrants for any documents."

The Mexican Consulate in Boston does not require applicants for "matriculas" to prove they are fully documented. Requirements for a card include a Mexican or U.S. ID, a Mexican birth certificate and proof of address in the United States, said Deputy Consul Rodrigo Marquez.

Marquez said the issuance of the matriculas is not meant to be tied to immigration enforcement. Mexico has been issuing the matriculas for more than 100 years, he said, noting other countries can issue the documents intended to show foreign nationals are registered with their consulates or embassies.

"We always tell people that this doesn’t mean they’re documented or undocumented, it’s just proof that they’re registered with us," Marquez said. "The matricula is the proof of registration. The banks decide what to do with the matricula."

Hedlund’s bill would ban state-chartered banks from doing business with immigrants whose only forms of identification are foreign-government issued documents like the matriculas. The bill still would allow banks to accept passports and Canadian drivers’ licenses. The joint Financial Services Committee will consider the legislation during a March 7 hearing.

State Rep. Marie Parente, D-Milford, supports the bill.

"I don’t think any foreign country has the right to give any kind of documents that appear to make (illegal immigrants) legal," Parente said. "Anyone who has gone through the tremendous effort of supplying documentation should not have to stand by and see people who have no standing in this country get what is a permit from their foreign country."

Hedlund’s bill would apply only to state-chartered banks. Bank of America, a national bank, allows customers to open accounts with matriculas, according to Ali Noorani, executive director of the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition.

Noorani said immigrants should be allowed to have basic banking abilities regardless of their documentation status. Immigrants could always forge documents to open bank accounts, he pointed out.

"I think a stable banking system is much more important than asking bankers to serve as immigration officials," Noorani said.

Laura Medrano, executive director of MetroWest Latin American Center and vice president of the Northeast chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens, called Hedlund’s bill "ridiculous."
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