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Posted: 2/9/2006 1:02:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 3:24:21 PM EDT by Dusty_C]
I've applied for a few jobs lately where you had to sign authorization for them to run a credit check on you. I think it's BS and they shouldn't be able to. What do you think?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:04:54 PM EDT
Employers should have the right to run a credit check on you with your consent. Employees should have the right to not provide consent. If you're asking "should the government prohibit prospective employers from running credit checks" my answer is "no".
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:04:58 PM EDT
For professional positions. Yes.

If you cannot manager your money, I do not want you managing mine.

If I am hiring a janitor then I do not care.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:06:28 PM EDT
sure, why not? (my credit is fine, how about yours?)
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:06:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By attack:
For professional positions. Yes.

If you cannot manager your money, I do not want you managing mine.

If I am hiring a janitor then I do not care.



Doesn't the janitor have the keys to everything?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:07:32 PM EDT
Yes.

It is one of the better measures of character.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:07:47 PM EDT
This particular job is as a truck driver.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:08:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mmx1:

Originally Posted By attack:
For professional positions. Yes.

If you cannot manager your money, I do not want you managing mine.

If I am hiring a janitor then I do not care.



Doesn't the janitor have the keys to everything?



not to the safe.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:09:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ghengiskhabb:
Yes.

It is one of the better measures of character.

So someone that has had their credit destroyed in a divorce has bad character? I think not. I have decent credit and it was actually improved by my divorce. I'm not worried about the results of it, just the privacy. Not to mention probably HALF of all credit reports have false entries.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:09:31 PM EDT
I think another aspect is possibly that they feel someone with bad credit and lots of debt is more likely to steal from the company in some way.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:14:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dolanp:
I think another aspect is possibly that they feel someone with bad credit and lots of debt is more likely to steal from the company in some way.



and if they are driving a truck, they may incur some liability to the company if they are irresponsible and cause an accident. Or, maybe log on a few extra miles to boos their pay. or..........whatever else they may think of..........
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:15:03 PM EDT
While I don't run credit checks.....it is an important judge of character.

Whether it be an employee or (believe it or not) even girlfriend. (not that I would consider running a credit check on someone I was dating, but in my old age, I have noticed that girls with good credit are better "girlfriends". If that makes any sense to anyone except me.)
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:15:47 PM EDT
I had to go through a credit report just to be considered for work during a two week shutdown at a nuke plant. No big deal for me, but I can understand why some people might have a problem with it.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:16:48 PM EDT

I think turnabout is fair play.

I want to see credit reports for everyone up the line from me in the chain of command. After all, if they can't manage their own money, how can I be sure my job will be there tomorrow?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:18:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
Employers should have the right to run a credit check on you with your consent. Employees should have the right to not provide consent. If you're asking "should the government prohibit prospective employers from running credit checks" my answer is "no".



Give this man a cigar!
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:22:51 PM EDT
An employer wants to know how you handle your money before they let you handle their money.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:27:08 PM EDT
If I'm hiring someone with cash management responsibilities, I'm running a credit check before hiring. People who have heavy debts and easy access to someone else's cash are a bad combination.

If I'm hiring a production employee who doesn't collect cash, doesn't sign checks or has any say in the financial aspect of the business, I really don't see the point. If I'm going to hire a guy to wash windows, I don't really care what his credit is like.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:29:10 PM EDT
Those of you saying a credit report is a GOOD measure of character is wrong. I messed up on my first credit card and it took me a while to straighten it out again, going by my credit report someone might have thought I was untrustworthy. In actuality I am one of the MOST honest people you will ever meet. I have NEVER stolen EVER, not even as a kid.

My credit Is fine now, but I dont think what a computer says should be the true measure of a man.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:29:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sigarkar:
sure, why not? (my credit is fine, how about yours?)



I think we also need to know your sexual history.

How many firearms you possess.

Your marriage history.

Your medical history.

Now me, I've got nuthin' to hide...you? Is that even relevant?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:35:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:
I think turnabout is fair play.

I want to see credit reports for everyone up the line from me in the chain of command. After all, if they can't manage their own money, how can I be sure my job will be there tomorrow?



Isn't that the damn truth these days.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:36:14 PM EDT
YES Definitely and here's why:

A lot of professional positions attract "High Rollers" and you know exactly what I mean. They are people with champaign tastes and beer budgets. (Just about EVERYONE in a commission or base plus commission sales position qualifys for that statement.)

You hire someone who likes to "flash the cash", drives a Lexus (gee, you were stupid enough to pay $60k for a CAMRY???), lives in the country club addition and is in hock up to their eyeballs. Bankruptcies waiting to happen, and when they do they will rip off YOU! You, as an employer will always be at fault no matter what a "high roller's" problem is...you're not paying him enough, you passed him over for a promotion, etc, etc, and he/she will steal from you to continue their lavish and undeserved lifestyle.

I'd rather hire a person of modest means and then help them make themselves rich than hire a high-roller and have him suck me down with him.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:38:23 PM EDT
I think a credit check is a smart idea for employers.

It can show a lot of things in a prospective employees background.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:39:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By ghengiskhabb:
Yes.

It is one of the better measures of character.


So someone that has had their credit destroyed in a divorce has bad character? I think not. I have decent credit and it was actually improved by my divorce. I'm not worried about the results of it, just the privacy. Not to mention probably HALF of all credit reports have false entries.



I said "better" measure, not "perfect" measure.

Why would/should an employer take an unnecessary risk with their own money and property on somebody with bad credit?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:40:15 PM EDT
Where is the Hell No option?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:40:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SS109:
I think a credit check is a smart idea for employers.

It can show a lot of things in a prospective employees background.

As said before, it can also show that they are the victim of credit card fraud, not to mention the EXTREMLY common mistakes on the reports. As I've said, I've got nothing to hide, I just think it's none of their buisness.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:40:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:40:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 1:51:42 PM EDT by HardShell]
I think they should find out whether you know the difference between perspective and prospective first...




(J/K )


I'll have to agree with the very first response you got:


Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
Employers should have the right to run a credit check on you with your consent. Employees should have the right to not provide consent. If you're asking "should the government prohibit prospective employers from running credit checks" my answer is "no".

Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:41:15 PM EDT
i just encountered this last week. i did not check that box. the HR rep asked me why. i informed her that i hold a fully adjudicated TOP SECRET clearance with an SSBI investigation and that i didnt think her little engineering company needed to scrutinize my personal finances. she was ok with that and didnt press it. we'll see if they make me an offer.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:41:20 PM EDT
Uh huh, like you've never spelled fonotiklee
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:46:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By geerhed:

Originally Posted By sigarkar:
sure, why not? (my credit is fine, how about yours?)



I think we also need to know your sexual history.

How many firearms you possess.

Your marriage history.

Your medical history.

Now me, I've got nuthin' to hide...you? Is that even relevant?



As I recall, there is usually a part of the application/interview process where they want to know about hobbies, if there are physical limitations, children, special accomodations, etc. They WILL find out what they want to know. They can also call your former employer and ask questions and know by what they are told (or not told) as to your work history. Much of this is irrelevant to ones work, but, whether someone may steal is. Credit history may be a good indicator.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:48:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By ghengiskhabb:
Yes.

It is one of the better measures of character.

So someone that has had their credit destroyed in a divorce has bad character? I think not. I have decent credit and it was actually improved by my divorce. I'm not worried about the results of it, just the privacy. Not to mention probably HALF of all credit reports have false entries.



Well you married her...

While a few people will be victims of this it is correctable/explainable and there is a definite need to check the credit of potential employees in some businesses.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:48:38 PM EDT
Dusty, can you clarify your question? When you say "be able to", do you mean to ask "should it be legal"? Or are you asking for an opinion of the practice in general, government involvement notwithstanding?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:49:41 PM EDT
One more step on the road to hell. I'm more and more convinced lately that the Social Security Number truly is the mark of the beast.

As for a credit check being a 'mark of character?'

Bullshit.

I know plenty of folks who were like I was up until a year or so ago. No credit rating. At all.

Why?

Because not only did I not make mistakes, I also didn't go financing shit, getting credit cards, etc. I lived quite comfortably saving my money for things I wanted, and paying my bills on time.

Does the fact that I didn't have some arbitrary number assigned to my name make me 'irresponsible?'
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:52:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
Dusty, can you clarify your question? When you say "be able to", do you mean to ask "should it be legal"? Or are you asking for an opinion of the practice in general, government involvement notwithstanding?

I'm curious as to what everyones opinion is on whether or not a company should be able to do a credit check. I know it's legal but shouldn't this be beyond what they can ask? I think it's a privacy issue.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 1:56:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
Dusty, can you clarify your question? When you say "be able to", do you mean to ask "should it be legal"? Or are you asking for an opinion of the practice in general, government involvement notwithstanding?

I'm curious as to what everyones opinion is on whether or not a company should be able to do a credit check. I know it's legal but shouldn't this be beyond what they can ask? I think it's a privacy issue.



Actually, Dusty, you've answered yourself.

A job cannot check your credit on their own, for no reason.

You have to sign a consent. Signing this consent is likely a condition to be considered for employment. Just like consenting to a pre-employment drug screening is usually a condition to be considered for employment.

You have a choice at this point: A) Sign, and be considered, or B) Tell them to pound sand, and inquire about employment elsewhere.

Link Posted: 2/9/2006 2:09:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
Dusty, can you clarify your question? When you say "be able to", do you mean to ask "should it be legal"? Or are you asking for an opinion of the practice in general, government involvement notwithstanding?

I'm curious as to what everyones opinion is on whether or not a company should be able to do a credit check. I know it's legal but shouldn't this be beyond what they can ask? I think it's a privacy issue.



If you are worried about you privacy....don't give them permission. It's that simple. They won't investigate your ability to run your own affairs before entrusting you with their business investments. You likely won't get the job....but you'll have your privacy. Ever hear the saying "cutting off your nose to spite your face"?

I have to fax in an authorization form this very evening, allowing a Gentleman for whom I hope to go to work, to run a credit / background check on me. My credit is good. I have no skeletons in my closet...and I'm proud of it. Furthermore, I don't really give a flyin fuck who knows that I'm an upstanding citizen.

The job I am seeking involves managing about $50 million dollars of the Gentlemans' business investments. I don't begrudge him making every effort to ascertain my charachter, ability to manage capital, or any other questions he can envision. Were I concerned with regards to what he may find out...I'd look for a job that requires less scrutiny. Hell, I'll bet even Wally World would hire me....but the job challenges and remuneration don't compare!
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 2:15:43 PM EDT
i dont believe its cutting off your nose. if youre a good applicant, with good references not allowing a credit check will not keep you from getting the job. it just means you need to be that much stronger of a candidate.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 2:32:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 2:34:04 PM EDT by pcsutton]

Originally Posted By DvlDog:
i dont believe its cutting off your nose. if youre a good applicant, with good references not allowing a credit check will not keep you from getting the job. it just means you need to be that much stronger of a candidate.



As stated in previous posts...it depends on the position. A person hiring Computer techs, or airline pilots, likely won't put as much credence into what shape the candidates personal finances are in. They would most likely be scrutinized for security/criminal criteria.

On the other hand, someone that handles cash, securities, or tangible convertable assets would likely require more screening to ascertain that they are unlikely to abscond with recipts and/or tangible easily converted assets. It would also depend on the autonomy of the position and the amount of audit supervision that can be maintained over that person. It's basic risk management.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 2:53:30 PM EDT
My current employer everyone from the CEO to the file clerk goes through a rigorous background check:

- Criminal history run by a national firm
- Credit history
- Work history verification
- Education verification
- Every reference is called and grilled for 30+ minutes
- Psychological profile and assessment
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 2:56:14 PM EDT
Apply for a government job, or one with a contractor.

The credit check is the least invasive part.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:11:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 3:16:30 PM EDT by ShadowCompany]
It should be 'prospective' not "perspective". Sorry man.

ETA: These days employers can't do a lot of asking questions about you with your former employers, so a credit check is about all they have to go on as far as evaluating your personal character, outside of a job interview. References are always going to be good, otherwise you wouldn't refer them.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:20:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pcsutton:

Originally Posted By DvlDog:
i dont believe its cutting off your nose. if youre a good applicant, with good references not allowing a credit check will not keep you from getting the job. it just means you need to be that much stronger of a candidate.



As stated in previous posts...it depends on the position. A person hiring Computer techs, or airline pilots, likely won't put as much credence into what shape the candidates personal finances are in. They would most likely be scrutinized for security/criminal criteria.

On the other hand, someone that handles cash, securities, or tangible convertable assets would likely require more screening to ascertain that they are unlikely to abscond with recipts and/or tangible easily converted assets. It would also depend on the autonomy of the position and the amount of audit supervision that can be maintained over that person. It's basic risk management.

+1
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:23:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JoeWang:
My current employer everyone from the CEO to the file clerk goes through a rigorous background check:

- Criminal history run by a national firm
- Credit history
- Work history verification
- Education verification
- Every reference is called and grilled for 30+ minutes
- Psychological profile and assessment

Lots of places that'd be hard to do since a work reference cannot do anything more than confirm or deny dates of employment, rate of pay, and whether or not they'd rehire the person. Arkansas is like that anyway.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:24:55 PM EDT
I had a credit checks back when I was applying to be a Financial Advisor...For what the potential pay was I had no problems with it.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:25:56 PM EDT
If you are directly handling money I don't have a problem with it, otherwise, NO.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:36:51 PM EDT
I am all for it.
If you have bad credit you are a risk as an employee. It is certainly a more legitimate thing to look at then most of what HR does. I have yet to work anyplace where HR has a clue though. I've watched them hire more incompetent, lazy psychos than I could count and I had their number inside of 2 minutes.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:53:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 4:03:37 PM EDT by JoeWang]

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By JoeWang:
My current employer everyone from the CEO to the file clerk goes through a rigorous background check:

- Criminal history run by a national firm
- Credit history
- Work history verification
- Education verification
- Every reference is called and grilled for 30+ minutes
- Psychological profile and assessment

Lots of places that'd be hard to do since a work reference cannot do anything more than confirm or deny dates of employment, rate of pay, and whether or not they'd rehire the person. Arkansas is like that anyway.



Sorry, only *professional* references are grilled. If the professional reference is a technical dumbass, he/she/it gets removed and we ask for a new reference.

Work history is different, see above.

ETA both times I've outed frauds in a company I worked for they both had very shitty credit scores. Not all people with bad credit are frauds, but most frauds have bad credit. One went to prison, and I testified at his sentencing hearing towards his deceipt. I hope he likes taking it up the poop chute during his 5 year stay for his $80k take.

If you're going to commit a crime, at least make the profit worth the penalty.

Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:57:12 PM EDT
gotcha
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:59:58 PM EDT
Depends on the position. If you'll be handling money, then it makes sense. Otherwise, it's none of their business, IMO.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 4:00:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By attack:
For professional positions. Yes.

If you cannot manager your money, I do not want you managing mine.

If I am hiring a janitor then I do not care.



What?

The janitor has access to everything in the building
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 4:06:57 PM EDT
I wish they would run a credit check on me....see my outstanding credit and offer me the fing job already!!!!
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