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Posted: 2/8/2006 3:57:50 PM EDT
Anybody here work on one,or have you worked on one? Looks like a pretty cool job to me.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:00:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:05:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 4:06:39 PM EDT by DanishM1Garand]
Never worked offshore. Oilfield work pays well but they get they damn moneys worth. Made Marine Corps bootcamp seem reasonable. You find that the limits you have are lower than what is possible. Those fishing boats in Alaska on TV look like it might be just a bit harder with everything moving and all. Drilling season is 52 weeks a year though.

Do it, save your money, and retire before you are crippled. I have 2 friends that the oilpatch crippled.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:10:58 PM EDT
An uncle of mine was an electrician on the offshore rigs for about 25 years. Made good money, retired and has three ex-wives to show for it He's the type that didn't like sitting in one place or being home much so he liked it.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:19:54 PM EDT
I owrk th eoilfield in Norhtern Alberta.... it is hard tough thankless work, I can only guess that offshore is much worse.


That all saidm, i woudl not change it for anything, I love my job, and damned if I am goign to stop before my time
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:37:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DanishM1Garand:
Never worked offshore. Oilfield work pays well but they get they damn moneys worth. Made Marine Corps bootcamp seem reasonable. You find that the limits you have are lower than what is possible. Those fishing boats in Alaska on TV look like it might be just a bit harder with everything moving and all. Drilling season is 52 weeks a year though.

Do it, save your money, and retire before you are crippled. I have 2 friends that the oilpatch crippled.



Fishing the Bering Strait is not something i would do.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:42:24 PM EDT
I looked into become a diver for that industry.

Long stays at sea, months on end with few or NO women. I changed my mind.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:51:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BangStick1:
I looked into become a diver for that industry.

Long stays at sea, months on end with few or NO women. I changed my mind.



I am not getting any here so that is not an issue
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:05:23 PM EDT
I grew up working on rotary rigs, and have worked on cable-tool rigs, pulling units, cement trucks and all the varied oil patch jobs. Was pushing tools before the biz took a shit in the 70's.

If commercial crabbing in Alaska is the most dangerous job...the oil patch comes in a close second. I've seen people killed and crippled on drilling rigs....a direct result of somebody doing something stupid or not paying attention.

Western Wyoming is booming for drilling rig work as they are opening up wells that weren't financially viable until the price of oil went up so high. Roughnecks are knockin down 50k +! And there is a shortage of both trained roughnecks.......and apartments. There are lots of camp jobs.

If you decide to be oilfield trash...it'll get in your blood...and you'll work your ass off on a nasty greasey, hot, cold, wet job.....and you'll love it!

Luck!
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 9:31:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pcsutton:
I grew up working on rotary rigs, and have worked on cable-tool rigs, pulling units, cement trucks and all the varied oil patch jobs. Was pushing tools before the biz took a shit in the 70's.

If commercial crabbing in Alaska is the most dangerous job...the oil patch comes in a close second. I've seen people killed and crippled on drilling rigs....a direct result of somebody doing something stupid or not paying attention.

Western Wyoming is booming for drilling rig work as they are opening up wells that weren't financially viable until the price of oil went up so high. Roughnecks are knockin down 50k +! And there is a shortage of both trained roughnecks.......and apartments. There are lots of camp jobs.

If you decide to be oilfield trash...it'll get in your blood...and you'll work your ass off on a nasty greasey, hot, cold, wet job.....and you'll love it!

Luck!



I like the Gulf Coast much better.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 6:40:31 PM EDT
Gotta be some more here...
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 6:44:49 PM EDT
There are several people that I know on these boards that work on drilling rigs and offshore production platforms. I work on land inland and offshore drilling rigs maintaining the drilling fluids. Its a decent job that pays fairly well, but I dunno about "cool". There are several different jobs to be had on the rigs, none of what I'd consider cool.

Try posting in hometown forum of Gulf States or Texas and I'm sure you'll find many of us.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:03:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CajunMojo:
There are several people that I know on these boards that work on drilling rigs and offshore production platforms. I work on land inland and offshore drilling rigs maintaining the drilling fluids. Its a decent job that pays fairly well, but I dunno about "cool". There are several different jobs to be had on the rigs, none of what I'd consider cool.

Try posting in hometown forum of Gulf States or Texas and I'm sure you'll find many of us.



Is the cash as good as i hear?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:20:50 PM EDT
I started working offshore when I came to Alaska in 1983, probably spent 70% of my time offshore and the rest on the North Slope. I was an Ironworker by trade, I went to work connecting iron when I was 17 years old so it was an easy transition to start building Derricks as a Rig Builder. I worked the Gulf Coast, Offshore out of Long Beach California and most of the time in the Cook Inlet (Alaska). I found each area to be very different from one another as well as each platform to vary from one another. Platforms are just like anywhere else, some of the jobs are easy and some are a real Bitch. The Alaskan Platforms are the nicest to live on the conditions range from kind of rough to pretty decent places, the tides dictate the use of Helicopters so you fly in some pretty nasty weather and any Platform gets old if you have been on board for six or seven weeks. If I had it all to do over I would do the same thing, just more of it.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:50:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
Is the cash as good as i hear?



It really depends on the job. And what you consider good cash. Most of the jobs would be 14 days on, 14 days off. Probably 12 bucks an hour starting as a roustabout. 84 hour week... avg 180/day. There are many jobs in the oilfield though. Do you have any college education?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:53:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CajunMojo:

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
Is the cash as good as i hear?



It really depends on the job. And what you consider good cash. Most of the jobs would be 14 days on, 14 days off. Probably 12 bucks an hour starting as a roustabout. 84 hour week... avg 180/day. There are many jobs in the oilfield though. Do you have any college education?



Well that is not as much as i have heard.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:57:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 7:57:46 PM EDT by CajunMojo]
www.noblecorp.com/

www.rowancompanies.com/

www.diamondoffshore.com/

www.glm.com/index_fl.html

Check out the sites and look for phone numbers in the Gulf Coast give them a call, ask questions about hiring, pay etc. I was making a guess as to the hourly rate of a roustabout. I don't keep up with it that well.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:02:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:

Well that is not as much as i have heard.



What have you heard?
As I said, I took a guess as to what a roustabout makes. The big bucks are there if you do your homework and become a company rep. They're knocking down 1200/day plus. I've heard of some in the 1800/day range. Directional drillers make good cash too. But both of those take some years of experience.
I have heard that they are paying very well for rig hands in Oklahoma.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:05:22 PM EDT
I have been seeing 300 a day everywhere i look.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:05:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 8:07:44 PM EDT by the_ak_kid]
i work for Halliburton in well control, we do snubbing and hydraulic work overs, and hot taps and shit, its a fuckin blast.....dangerous yes, you gotta have your wits about you, but it is without a doubt the greatest job ive ever had....i actually enjoy and look forward to going to work every morning.......and yeah, offshore sucks, especially when you look down from the snubbin basket and realize...holy shit, im 175 feet off the water with nothing but those 8 bolts, and these three guy wires holdin me up..............TALK ABOUT A RUSH,

with NO experience, and i mean none whatsoever, we are starting our new guys around 30k to 40k a year, depending on how many hours you are willing to work
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:12:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
I have been seeing 300 a day everywhere i look.



That sounds a little high for roustabout pay, but I could be wrong. Where have you seen this at? I'd look for contact numbers on the websites I gave you and call and ask. Let us know what you find out.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:16:40 PM EDT
I have had a few friends go work offshore during the summers. They worked 16 hour days of sand blasting and painting, and these are 18-21 yr old college students. They either worked 3 weeks on 1 off, or 2 weeks on 1 off, or whatever other combination they were told to. There are some really nice guys out there then theres some really strange guys. Ive heard stories about guys that havent been back to shore for a few months, those guys were pretty crazy. I like to fish around them. They have the best artificial reefs around.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:19:55 PM EDT
Several different websites about working on rigs. I know it is not easy work,but i am tired of ND and what to do something different.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:29:08 PM EDT
come to texas, were still looking for 3 or 4 more guys, you'll see the world and in 2-3 years time your lookin at 70-80k a year realistically. On top of that you hit the best bars in every town you stay in, and for some reaaon when you say halliburton, you can almost see the dollar signs in womens eyes as they hand you the key to their room
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:30:06 PM EDT
HarrySazc is there any Oilfield activity in the Williston N.D. area?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:30:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By the_ak_kid:
come to texas, were still looking for 3 or 4 more guys, you'll see the world and in 2-3 years time your lookin at 70-80k a year realistically. On top of that you hit the best bars in every town you stay in, and for some reaaon when you say halliburton, you can almost see the dollar signs in womens eyes as they hand you the key to their room



Would i get to see the hurricane machine?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:35:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 8:37:12 PM EDT by CajunMojo]
The sites that I posted are several of the majors that I can think of off the top of my head. Get numbers, call all of them, figure the average wages for a roustabout. If its worth it to you and if you have some time and money to spare drive down and I'm sure you can get a job with one of them. I live in Lafayette, La. and they have several offices. I'm pretty sure almost all of them have offices in Houston, Tx.

Are you fairly young?
Do you have a High school diploma?
Can you stand to be away from home for 2 weeks at a time?
Can you pass a drug test?

If you don't answer yes to all, you'll have a hard time getting a job or wanting to keep it.

ETA: I've been with Halliburton for the last 6 years and I've never seen the Hurricane machine... Only the results of it
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:37:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CajunMojo:
The sites that I posted are several of the majors that I can think of off the top of my head. Get numbers, call all of them, figure the average wages for a roustabout. If its worth it to you and if you have some time and money to spare drive down and I'm sure you can get a job with one of them. I live in Lafayette, La. and they have several offices. I'm pretty sure almost all of them have offices in Houston, Tx.

Are you fairly young?
Do you have a High school diploma?
Can you stand to be away from home for 2 weeks at a time?
Can you pass a drug test?

If you don't answer yes to all, you'll have a hard time getting a job or wanting to keep it.



Yes, 24 years old high school, love to be away from home for a couple weeks,and i guess i could give up the blow, but i am keeping the hookers
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:39:11 PM EDT
Hookers are not only accepted, they're encouraged
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:40:11 PM EDT
My uncle designs them, and is working on Crazy Horse right now in the Gulf.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:10:04 PM EDT
I work mostly in Texas Land, doing MWD work for Schlumberger. Pay is excellent, though the schedule isn't so great sometimes. I'm currently making over $300 every day I'm on a rig, plus salary and some other assorted bonuses. How many people are we looking for? I can get a $1000 bonus for referring a new employee who stays for at least 60 days. There are dozens of other types of jobs to be had too - it depends on your education and experience level, and what kind of work you want to do. The market is booming, and it's a great time to get in.

My job tends to be fairly independent - you're working mostly on your own, no managers looking over your shoulder all the time. There's a lot of problem solving and working with various types of people. It can be fascinating and rewarding at times. At other times, you may have been up for three days in a row and haven't seen a woman in a month, and start to wonder just what you've gotten yourself into.

There have been a lot of safety problems over the years, but there's been a lot of improvement lately. All the big companies are unbelievably anal about safety, and it seems to be paying off.
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