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Posted: 2/8/2006 3:53:15 PM EDT
Some of you may remember the courageous act of Mark Wilson, a CCW holder who confonted a gunman wielding an AK-47-type weapon (could have been SAR-1, SAR-2, unknown) that had already killed his ex-wife. Mr. Wilson traded fire with the gunman and was killed. However, his actions allowed the boy to escape and live. Here is an article about Mr. Wilson's act.


Charleston Daily Mail (West Virginia)

February 25, 2005, Friday

SECTION: News; Pg. P8C

LENGTH: 788 words

HEADLINE: Texas man dies confronting gunman

BYLINE: FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM

BODY: Man dies while trying to stop rampage credited with saving the life of the gunman's son

TYLER, Texas - A 52-year-old manufacturing plant employee, credited with saving another man's life by jumping into the middle of a fierce firefight on a Texas downtown square, was known for taking life "head-on." Friends weren't surprised to hear that Mark Wilson sacrificed his own life byconfronting a gunman firing an AK-47 assault-style rifle Thursday in Tyler, Texas.

"He is the type of person who would grab his gun and go," said Lewis George of Dallas, Wilson's former brother-in-law and best friend for 30 years. "If it was me, I would have been running the other way.

"Mark, he took life head-on."

Wilson was shot several times by David Hernandez Arroyo Sr. during a deadly shooting spree outside the Smith County Courthouse. Aroyo also killed his ex-wife and wounded his 23-year-old son and three police officers.

Wilson, who lived in a loft apartment on the square, had apparently just returned home after having lunch with a friend when he saw Arroyo walking down the street, shooting people, friends said.

Wilson, who had once owned a gun range in Tyler, apparently grabbed a Glock9mm handgun and ran downstairs. One eyewitness said they traded shots, initially missing each other until Arroyo hit Wilson.

"The gunman walked up to Wilson and shot him while he was on the ground," TheAssociated Press reported Tyler Morning Telegraph publisher Nelson Clyde III saying in today's editions of the newspaper. "I couldn't believe what I was seeing. It was sickening."

Arroyo was wearing body armor. But by distracting Arroyo, police said, Wilsonprevented him from fatally shooting his son, David Hernandez Arroyo Jr.

"Based on what we can tell, Mr. Wilson may have saved the younger Arroyo's life," Tyler Police Chief Gary Swindle said. Swindle told The Associated Pressthat Wilson may have hit the gunman, but that his rounds did not penetrate the man's body armor.

"Arroyo was shot by his father, and we believe around that point in time is maybe when Mr. Wilson came up and confronted the suspect," Swindle said.

Lorraine Childress, a sales assistant for Merill Lynch, watched the shootout from her 16th-floor office overlooking downtown Tyler. Little did she know that her friend Mark Wilson was trying to stop the rampage. "We are so proud of our friend," Childress said. "We know Mark saved this young man's life by doing what he did."

Word of Wilson's courageous act quickly spread through this community of 86,000 about 125 miles east of Fort Worth, and no one seemed surprised that Wilson jumped into the middle of the shootout.

Just outside the front of the loft where Wilson lived, the courthouse square was covered in crime scene tape and the street was littered with shell casings. Police had cordoned off Wilson's white Dodge pickup.

Behind the truck, Wilson's prized Porsche 911 was covered by a tarp.

"Ever since he moved into those lofts eight years ago, he's been on the lookout down on the square," said Deborah O'Sullivan, whose husband, John, is the landlord of the lofts where Wilson lived.

"With his knowledge of weapons, he would have immediately known it was gunfire and taken action. That's just Mark. He was always looking out for others." . . .

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:26:55 PM EDT
Sad, I think failure drills should be standard practice. Similar thing happened to me when I lived in Houston. Heard gunshots at my apt complex, this was right after columbine. Ran downstairs with my G27 in my jacket and luckily never had to use it. Some guy shot another guy who was banging his wife ~8 times with a 9mm. It was a weird seeing bubbles come out of his chest when we were giving him CPR. Died before paramedics got there. Shooter just sat there on the steps and cried.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:32:47 PM EDT
We should all learn from his experience and have a long rifle plan.

Good man, good post.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:34:54 PM EDT
NO disrespect intended to him, but if he grabbed a rifle instead, it might have ended better for him.

I hope I would do similar in a situation like that.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:38:33 PM EDT
After that happened, I started keeping a rifle handy (home and car) in addition to a pistol.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:39:49 PM EDT
Having the balls to step out in front of an AK and trade fire is a hell of a lot more than most Internet Heros do in their wet dreams. I only hope that I would react similarly, but until the shooting starts, you never know...


to Mr Wilson( even a year later) for having serious stones
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:50:59 PM EDT
God Bless Him.


HEADSHOTS mean all I say is... " I was in fear for my life. I want my lawyer."
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:52:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 4:53:57 PM EDT by roboman]

Originally Posted By Reload_em:
Having the balls to step out in front of an AK and trade fire is a hell of a lot more than most Internet Heros do in their wet dreams. I only hope that I would react similarly, but until the shooting starts, you never know...


to Mr Wilson( even a year later) for having serious stones



Bingo. Mr. Wilson was one hell of a brave man to face down an AK with a handgun. Many talk tough, but when the shit starts flying is only when you'll know if you have what it takes. I can honestly say I don't know if I would have been able to do what he did. I'd like to think I was brave enough, but goddamn....

While it would have been more ideal to grab a rifle, it may not have been possible at the time, we'll probably never know.

Either way, he saved that kid's life and countless others.

God bless Mark Wilson.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:07:30 PM EDT
From Jeff Cooper's Commentaries
Vol. 1, No. 1 June 1993

As time passes we discover that there are a good many readers who have not been to school and who are puzzled by our reference to "The Mozambique Drill."

I added The Mozambique Drill to the modern doctrine after hearing of an experience of a student of mine up in Mozambique when that country was abandoned. My friend was involved in the fighting that took place around the airport of Laurenco Marquez. At one point, Mike turned a corner was confronted by a terrorist carrying an AK47. The man was advancing toward him at a walk at a range of perhaps 10 paces. Mike, who was a good shot, came up with his P35 and planted two satisfactory hits, one on each side of the wishbone. He expected his adversary to drop, but nothing happened, and the man continued to close the range. At this point, our boy quite sensibly opted to go for the head and tried to do so, but he was a little bit upset by this time and mashed slightly on the trigger, catching the terrorist precisely between the collar bones and severing his spinal cord. This stopped the fight.

Upon analysis, it seemed to me that the pistolero should be accustomed to the idea of placing two shots amidships as fast as he can and then being prepared to change his point of aim if this achieves no results. Two shots amidships can be placed very quickly and very reliably and they will nearly always stop the fight providing a major-caliber pistol is used and the subject is not wearing body armor. However, simply chanting "two in the body, one in the head" oversimplifies matters, since it takes considerably longer to be absolutely sure of a head shot than it does to be quite sure of two shots in the thorax. The problem for the shooter is to change his pace, going just as fast as he can with his first pair, then, pausing to observe results or lack thereof, he must slow down and shoot precisely. This is not easy to do. The beginner tends to fire all three shots at the same speed, which is either too slow for the body shots or too fast for the head shot. This change of pace calls for concentration and coordination which can only be developed through practice.

Mike Rouseau was later killed in action in the Rhodesian War. May he rest in peace!

http://harris.dvc.org.uk/jeff/
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:20:45 PM EDT
Has it been a year already?
He has my utmost respect, he's a hero AFAIK
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:22:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Robert2011:
From Jeff Cooper's Commentaries
Vol. 1, No. 1 June 1993

As time passes we discover that there are a good many readers who have not been to school and who are puzzled by our reference to "The Mozambique Drill."

I added The Mozambique Drill to the modern doctrine after hearing of an experience of a student of mine up in Mozambique when that country was abandoned. My friend was involved in the fighting that took place around the airport of Laurenco Marquez. At one point, Mike turned a corner was confronted by a terrorist carrying an AK47. The man was advancing toward him at a walk at a range of perhaps 10 paces. Mike, who was a good shot, came up with his P35 and planted two satisfactory hits, one on each side of the wishbone. He expected his adversary to drop, but nothing happened, and the man continued to close the range. At this point, our boy quite sensibly opted to go for the head and tried to do so, but he was a little bit upset by this time and mashed slightly on the trigger, catching the terrorist precisely between the collar bones and severing his spinal cord. This stopped the fight.

Upon analysis, it seemed to me that the pistolero should be accustomed to the idea of placing two shots amidships as fast as he can and then being prepared to change his point of aim if this achieves no results. Two shots amidships can be placed very quickly and very reliably and they will nearly always stop the fight providing a major-caliber pistol is used and the subject is not wearing body armor. However, simply chanting "two in the body, one in the head" oversimplifies matters, since it takes considerably longer to be absolutely sure of a head shot than it does to be quite sure of two shots in the thorax. The problem for the shooter is to change his pace, going just as fast as he can with his first pair, then, pausing to observe results or lack thereof, he must slow down and shoot precisely. This is not easy to do. The beginner tends to fire all three shots at the same speed, which is either too slow for the body shots or too fast for the head shot. This change of pace calls for concentration and coordination which can only be developed through practice.

Mike Rouseau was later killed in action in the Rhodesian War. May he rest in peace!

http://harris.dvc.org.uk/jeff/



More gun rag BS. Maybe back in 1993 people when it was easier for Cooper to write all kinds of shit people would have bought this. Also, there's nothing overly complicated with learning the failure drill. I don't shoot according to a metronome, don't know anyone that does. Double tap CoM then 1 to the head. The only trick is the head will move in real life as opposed to training with a B34 target.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:31:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NonConformist:
He has my utmost respect, he's a hero AFAIK



+1

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:42:04 PM EDT
I guess I will be the first to mention that Wilson unfortunately did not use any cover or concealment.

I recall seeing the picture of Wilson's body face down in the middle of the street, far from any sort of cover.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:56:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

More gun rag BS.



Not at all. Cooper originally wrote the newsletter for his students. It was a way to keep up with things. The story is true and has been told many times before, even in person to me a dozen years before this was first published. No BS.

As to skill, you may think you are very good with a pistol and this is so simple a drill, but I have done "The Mozambique Drill” right in front of Cooper after much practice. His comment was, “That’s too slow.”

His standards are very high, but the end result is you more likely to be alive when the smoke clears.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:08:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 6:08:49 PM EDT by DukeSnookems]

Originally Posted By Robert2011:

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

More gun rag BS.



Not at all. Cooper originally wrote the newsletter for his students. It was a way to keep up with things. The story is true and has been told many times before, even in person to me a dozen years before this was first published. No BS.

As to skill, you may think you are very good with a pistol and this is so simple a drill, but I have done "The Mozambique Drill” right in front of Cooper after much practice. His comment was, “That’s too slow.”

His standards are very high, but the end result is you more likely to be alive when the smoke clears.



Not doubting the story but the assertion that "Two shots amidships can be placed very quickly and very reliably and they will nearly always stop the fight providing a major-caliber pistol is used."

My point is I don't think learning a failure drill is as hard as he's trying to make it sound. You don't need to be Wyatt Earp for it to be effective, that doubletap buys you a little time.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:28:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 6:28:34 PM EDT by Robert2011]

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

My point is I don't think learning a failure drill is as hard as he's trying to make it sound. You don't need to be Wyatt Earp for it to be effective, that doubletap buys you a little time.



You obviously have not done it in front of Cooper while he was grading you.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:34:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

Originally Posted By Robert2011:

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

More gun rag BS.



Not at all. Cooper originally wrote the newsletter for his students. It was a way to keep up with things. The story is true and has been told many times before, even in person to me a dozen years before this was first published. No BS.

As to skill, you may think you are very good with a pistol and this is so simple a drill, but I have done "The Mozambique Drill” right in front of Cooper after much practice. His comment was, “That’s too slow.”

His standards are very high, but the end result is you more likely to be alive when the smoke clears.



Not doubting the story but the assertion that "Two shots amidships can be placed very quickly and very reliably and they will nearly always stop the fight providing a major-caliber pistol is used."

My point is I don't think learning a failure drill is as hard as he's trying to make it sound. You don't need to be Wyatt Earp for it to be effective, that doubletap buys you a little time.



b-27's dont move.. bad guys do.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:06:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Robert2011:

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

My point is I don't think learning a failure drill is as hard as he's trying to make it sound. You don't need to be Wyatt Earp for it to be effective, that doubletap buys you a little time.



You obviously have not done it in front of Cooper while he was grading you.



My objective wouldn't be to impress him or win IDPA, just learn it enough to be practical. The 2 aren't necessarily the same, as you said, he has high standards. And even if you miss the head shot in a failure drill, you are no worse than if you just stuck with a double tap.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:07:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By freeride21a:

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

Originally Posted By Robert2011:

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

More gun rag BS.



Not at all. Cooper originally wrote the newsletter for his students. It was a way to keep up with things. The story is true and has been told many times before, even in person to me a dozen years before this was first published. No BS.

As to skill, you may think you are very good with a pistol and this is so simple a drill, but I have done "The Mozambique Drill” right in front of Cooper after much practice. His comment was, “That’s too slow.”

His standards are very high, but the end result is you more likely to be alive when the smoke clears.



Not doubting the story but the assertion that "Two shots amidships can be placed very quickly and very reliably and they will nearly always stop the fight providing a major-caliber pistol is used."

My point is I don't think learning a failure drill is as hard as he's trying to make it sound. You don't need to be Wyatt Earp for it to be effective, that doubletap buys you a little time.



b-27's dont move.. bad guys do.



Hence my statement above: "The only trick is the head will move in real life as opposed to training with a B34 target"
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:33:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

Originally Posted By freeride21a:

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

Originally Posted By Robert2011:

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

More gun rag BS.



Not at all. Cooper originally wrote the newsletter for his students. It was a way to keep up with things. The story is true and has been told many times before, even in person to me a dozen years before this was first published. No BS.

As to skill, you may think you are very good with a pistol and this is so simple a drill, but I have done "The Mozambique Drill” right in front of Cooper after much practice. His comment was, “That’s too slow.”

His standards are very high, but the end result is you more likely to be alive when the smoke clears.



Not doubting the story but the assertion that "Two shots amidships can be placed very quickly and very reliably and they will nearly always stop the fight providing a major-caliber pistol is used."

My point is I don't think learning a failure drill is as hard as he's trying to make it sound. You don't need to be Wyatt Earp for it to be effective, that doubletap buys you a little time.



b-27's dont move.. bad guys do.



Hence my statement above: "The only trick is the head will move in real life as opposed to training with a B34 target"



Guys! Enough with the thread hijack. This is not a place to debate the effectiveness of The Mozambique Drill. Have some respect for chrissakes.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 4:07:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 4:34:28 AM EDT by TacticalStrat]

Originally Posted By Silesius:
I guess I will be the first to mention that Wilson unfortunately did not use any cover or concealment.

I recall seeing the picture of Wilson's body face down in the middle of the street, far from any sort of cover.



Let's not tarnish Wilson's name or undermine his competence. Wilson was behind a truck for cover and was wounded by the rifle rounds, possibly which penetrated the truck. The gunman then walked over to Wilson who lay wounded in the street and fired several shots into Wilson's head to kill him. The truck Wilson was using for cover was the gunman's, who drove away in the truck after killing Wilson.

Here's an eyewitness account:


Link

Rick Wilbanks, a Tyler lawyer, witnessed all but the first few shots of the event while eating lunch at Don Juan's.

He saw another man with a gun, later identified as Mark Wilson, a former shooting range owner, hiding behind the gunman's parked truck.

"The shooter couldn't see him, but I could see both of them," Wilbanks said. "When the shooter stopped to reload, the guy behind the pickup came up and fired."

Wilbanks said he thought to himself, "I hope he is accurate."

"He hit him twice, he hit him bad, but he didn't kill him," he said.

The gunman, David Arroyo, was wearing body armor.

Wilbanks saw Arroyo turn around and fire at Wilson. Then the shooter got in his truck to leave.

"He did it unhurriedly and drove off slow. I could have run and kept up with him," Wilbanks said. "I think he was expecting to be killed by the cops, but no one but Wilson took a shot at him. That bugs me."

Wilbanks went to Wilson's aid after the gunman left the scene.

"It looked like he was hit in the back of the left side of his head and it went out the other side. There was a gallon of blood out there," he said. "I thought he was dead, it looked like he was dead, but then he moved a little. He was alive."

The shooter's victim was already down when Brandon Malone got a good look through the window of a downtown restaurant. He was shocked by what he saw next. The gunman walked over and shot the downed man again and again.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:10:13 AM EDT

The accounts and stories lack the the details of what range Wilson began shooting at. From the drawing of the area it could have been as much as 50 yards. More than likely it was from across the street and into the parkinglot, a bit far for most pistol shots. Typical pistol sights are larger than a human head at those distances so a headshot would have been difficult. Does anyone one have more details?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:15:18 AM EDT
I remeber that, it was an inspiring story.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:16:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By w4klr:
I remeber that, it was an inspiring story.




Yep, good stuff there.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:16:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Reload_em:
Having the balls to step out in front of an AK and trade fire is a hell of a lot more than most Internet Heros do in their wet dreams. I only hope that I would react similarly, but until the shooting starts, you never know...


to Mr Wilson( even a year later) for having serious stones



With all due respect if he used more cover and tactics and less balls he might have lived and saved the day.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:31:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 8:32:12 AM EDT by -Duke-Nukem-]
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:45:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MasterSniper:

Originally Posted By Reload_em:
Having the balls to step out in front of an AK and trade fire is a hell of a lot more than most Internet Heros do in their wet dreams. I only hope that I would react similarly, but until the shooting starts, you never know...


to Mr Wilson( even a year later) for having serious stones



With all due respect if he used more cover and tactics and less balls he might have lived and saved the day.




It sounds like Wilson did everything right, except plan that the shooter could have been wearing a bullet proof vest. Until I read about this story, I would have not even calculated the bullet-proof vest possibility into the equation of my response. I mean....how ofter do you hear of criminals wearing bullet proof vests when they commission a crime? The only other time I can think is the LA Bank Robbery.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:54:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 1IV:
God Bless Him.


HEADSHOTS mean all I say is... " I was in fear for my life. I want my lawyer."



I just took my CHL renewal class. I swear the guy said they are supposed to DEDUCT for headshots now, per DPS. Maybe I heard wrong but I definitely know they don't count them as hits.

Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:58:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By -Duke-Nukem-:
This story is about doing the right thing no matter what. No matter what the chances of survival are, no matter what the press or the law will say about it later, its about seeing a situation, knowing what the right thing to do is, and acting decisively to do it.

If more Americans had the moral clarity and decisiveness that this man showed, our country would be much stronger than it is now.


I do have to add that when this happened it caused me to seriously reconsider the usefulness of one particular firearm. If this situation happens and you can't get to a long gun, and have to use a carry gun, maybe you should be carrying this:

cmmginc.secure-mall.com/shop/images/391.jpg



Can you get the AP ammo for it though?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:59:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By -Duke-Nukem-:
This story is about doing the right thing no matter what. No matter what the chances of survival are, no matter what the press or the law will say about it later, its about seeing a situation, knowing what the right thing to do is, and acting decisively to do it.

If more Americans had the moral clarity and decisiveness that this man showed, our country would be much stronger than it is now.


I do have to add that when this happened it caused me to seriously reconsider the usefulness of one particular firearm. If this situation happens and you can't get to a long gun, and have to use a carry gun, maybe you should be carrying this:

cmmginc.secure-mall.com/shop/images/391.jpg



When congress stops blocking access to the SS190, that might be a good idea.

SARAH BRADY:"WHY DO YOU NEED AP!!?!?!?!"

REMEMBER MARK WILSON, YOU STUPID FUCKING BITCH!"
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