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Posted: 2/8/2006 12:04:22 PM EDT
So how do i get them out???

Torch?
PB blaster?
drill out then use a screw extactor?
weld a new nut on the broken stud???
I tried all these and I ended up drilling and tapping it but is there an easier way??? some other kind of penatraiting oil or something???
Thanks
BIG
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:03:13 PM EDT
First thing to try is cutting a screw driver slot in the end of the stud with a separating wheel in a dremel tool. As you start applying torque to the screw driver, have someone else tap on the end of the handle with a hammer - the longitudinal stress in the stud breaks the friction in the joint and allows the stud to start turning. Don't hit it like you are forging iron, just firm taps.

If that doesn't work, and the aluminum part is ultimately replaceable and no one's life is at risk if you over heat the part slightly, have your assistant apply gentle heat to the aluminum surrounding the stud. The coefficient of thermal expansion of aluminum is about 50% greater than steel, so this will increase the hole diameter and loosen its grip on the stud. A shop heat gun will work best, fire should be used carefully, and even your daughter's hair dryer may get the part hot enough. Then redo the first step with the screwdriver and hammer routine.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:18:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:31:46 PM EDT
Instead of a tapered extractor like the one pictured above, I normally go with more of a straight (although slightly tapered) extractor. The above captioned type expands the broken stud with increased pressure and further reduces your chances of removal.

Worst case, drill out stud, then purchase a helicoil kit and follow instructions.

Good luck. Aluminum and steel are a bad combo.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 3:11:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Craftsman #5 Spiral Screw Extractor

s7.sears.com/is/image/Sears/00966201000?layer=comp&wid=190&hei=190&fmt=jpeg&qlt=75,0&op_sharpen=0&resMode=norm&op_usm=0.5,1.0,0.0,0

www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_SessionID=@@@@1221709621.1139437013@@@@&BV_EngineID=cckjaddgmhfghdecegecegjdghldghg.0&vertical=SEARS&sid=I0093600100004900085&pid=00966201000




Yeah I cranked on it as hard as I dared to with an Irwin stubby extractor kit it did not budge.
Thanks for the input guys!!!!
Anyone else got some sneaky tricks for the steel aluminum snafu????
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 3:18:49 PM EDT
TIG weld a nut on the exposed end of the stud. The heat will break loose the crud that has the fastner bound. Let it cool all the way befor attempting to extract.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 3:21:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AeroE:
First thing to try is cutting a screw driver slot in the end of the stud with a separating wheel in a dremel tool. As you start applying torque to the screw driver, have someone else tap on the end of the handle with a hammer - the longitudinal stress in the stud breaks the friction in the joint and allows the stud to start turning. Don't hit it like you are forging iron, just firm taps.

If that doesn't work, and the aluminum part is ultimately replaceable and no one's life is at risk if you over heat the part slightly, have your assistant apply gentle heat to the aluminum surrounding the stud. The coefficient of thermal expansion of aluminum is about 50% greater than steel, so this will increase the hole diameter and loosen its grip on the stud. A shop heat gun will work best, fire should be used carefully, and even your daughter's hair dryer may get the part hot enough. Then redo the first step with the screwdriver and hammer routine.



+1 except instead of hammer and screwdriver, try one of these. http://www.kk.org/cooltools/archives/000723.php

They are the slickest thing for stuck fastners.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 3:22:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
TIG weld a nut on the exposed end of the stud. The heat will break loose the crud that has the fastner bound. Let it cool all the way befor attempting to extract.



YEs do this (you can also Mig it. ) next time give me a yell ya crazy scot.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 12:01:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wildweasel:

Originally Posted By Pangea:
TIG weld a nut on the exposed end of the stud. The heat will break loose the crud that has the fastner bound. Let it cool all the way befor attempting to extract.



YEs do this (you can also Mig it. ) next time give me a yell ya crazy scot.



I tried to mig it too but


Hey how about that library vote

And the quote of the day "I LOVE TO PAY TAXES"


Thank you all
BIG
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 12:13:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 12:27:35 AM EDT by twonami]
what the heck is it? tranny housing?
broken flush, above, below?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 12:23:22 AM EDT
had a similar deal but with steel and steel. Can you heat the aluminum housing to make the heat expand it to allow more play for the broken bit?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:48:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 3:58:03 AM EDT by AeroE]

Originally Posted By Weiseguy:
Originally Posted By AeroE:
First thing to try is cutting a screw driver slot in the end of the stud with a separating wheel in a dremel tool. As you start applying torque to the screw driver, have someone else tap on the end of the handle with a hammer - the longitudinal stress in the stud breaks the friction in the joint and allows the stud to start turning. Don't hit it like you are forging iron, just firm taps.

If that doesn't work, and the aluminum part is ultimately replaceable and no one's life is at risk if you over heat the part slightly, have your assistant apply gentle heat to the aluminum surrounding the stud. The coefficient of thermal expansion of aluminum is about 50% greater than steel, so this will increase the hole diameter and loosen its grip on the stud. A shop heat gun will work best, fire should be used carefully, and even your daughter's hair dryer may get the part hot enough. Then redo the first step with the screwdriver and hammer routine.



+1 except instead of hammer and screwdriver, try one of these. www.kk.org/cooltools/archives/000723.php

They are the slickest thing for stuck fastners.[/quote

I know, but most people don't have one and sometimes you have to improvise with the tools in the box. YOu also have to hit am impact wrench pretty hard to get things moving. There is a better tool sold by aircraft tool suppliers.

Just remember to have a crying chair handy when using "easy outs".
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:06:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By twonami:
what the heck is it? tranny housing?
broken flush, above, below?



It is a Hyd pump housing in a bucket loader and the steel stud was broken just above the the base
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:29:45 AM EDT
Be careful using hand impact tools on stuck studs in aluminum, hit the impact tool too hard and you take the chance of stripping the threads or splitting the housing.

If the broken stud is sticking far enough out welding a nut on it is your best bet. If it's flush then drilling, applying chemicals or heat, then working carefully with a screw extractor. Don't break the extractor off in it!

If you're really good with a drill you can drill it with a bit almost as big as the stud, then simply peel what's left out of the threads with a pick.

If all else fails and there's enough meat then drill and go oversize, if there's not enough meat then drill and use a timesert or helicoil.

If you seriously F'up the part, then drill it completely out, have it plug welded and redrill/tap for the original size stud.
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