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Posted: 2/8/2006 7:20:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:20:49 AM EDT
bulb
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:25:00 AM EDT
I would think it is the bulb. If you need to change the lamp becareful not to touch envelope, as this could cause the envelope to crack from the oils in your hand because of the intense heat generated.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:28:04 AM EDT
They have a ballast, the high pressure sodium will have an ignitor in its ballast while other types of bulbs don't.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:31:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 7:33:51 AM EDT by 1GUNRUNNER]
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:41:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By warlord:
If you need to change the lamp becareful not to touch envelope, as this could cause the envelope to crack from the oils in your hand because of the intense heat generated.





I think we are talking about 2 different things.

Looks simular to this...

us.st11.yimg.com/store1.yimg.com/I/elights_1879_82644062l


Come to think of it you're right. I was thinking "halogen" lamps.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:42:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:43:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 7:49:26 AM EDT by llanero]
Why do have that thing for?
Only criminals that force indoor flowering of their illicit closet-marijuana gardens need such high-powered red-spectrum lights.

eta: I couldn't find the libtard sacasm smiley
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:46:50 AM EDT
Since I'm in the bidness....

A lamp which is cycling - starting, warming up, then turning itself off - is probably overheating due to a bad bulb or ballast. A thermal protector is probably shutting down the fixture to protect it or the arc is being extinguished on its own. However, make sure that it is not something trivial like a photoelectric switch that is seeing the light from the lamp reflected from a white wall or fence and turning the fixture off once the (reflected) light intensity becomes great enough.

This is usually due to "end of life cycling". It's a characteristic of the bulb. Replace the bulb and this common problem should be remedied.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:46:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:51:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By warlord:
If you need to change the lamp becareful not to touch envelope, as this could cause the envelope to crack from the oils in your hand because of the intense heat generated.


The surface operating temperatures (of the glass envelope) don't reach that intensity in a LPS lamp. That is an issue common only to Quartz Halogen lamps.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 9:48:15 AM EDT
And after you change the bulb take the filament thing out of the old one and try sharpening your knife with it. Use it like a steel. It'll change your life.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 9:51:08 AM EDT
The REAL question should be:

What's the best round to use on a high-pressure sodium light that keeps going on and off?

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:00:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 10:01:34 AM EDT by thebeekeeper1]
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:03:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
On a related note--an old guy working at Menard's (regional business similar to Home Depot) introduced me to a great product which is spread on the threads of light bulbs to keep them from corroding and seizing into the socket. It was about $3 and works GREAT. It comes in a little plastic container and looks like "chap stick." Smear a tiny bit on the threads of bulbs (says not to do so on halogens) and they come out easy. I have used anti-seize compound on bolt threads for years and this stuff is just as great--especially if you've ever had a glass bulb break in your hand.


Yeah, I've seen that stuff also, I use it on automotive lamps in my car, where sometimes you get water inside the sockets and the lamp are frozen solid in the socket. Works great.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:52:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NorWester:
And after you change the bulb take the filament thing out of the old one and try sharpening your knife with it. Use it like a steel. It'll change your life.



+1............and it's the bulb. That's what they do when they go bad. I've replaced hundreds of them (seriously) and every time I've had to replace a ballast, they don't come on at all.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 11:11:52 AM EDT
Could it be a thermostat shut off for too high a temp?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 11:45:38 AM EDT
Could be all the WEEEEEEEEED
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 11:59:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By g3_ultra:

Originally Posted By NorWester:
And after you change the bulb take the filament thing out of the old one and try sharpening your knife with it. Use it like a steel. It'll change your life.



+1


Absolutely +1
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