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Posted: 2/7/2006 3:30:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 3:32:20 PM EDT by EladEflow]
Just curious, because me and my roommate are joking around about what temperature it should be on. Keep in mind we are both poor college students trying to pay the bills on our own. He has it at 55-60 all the time. I don't think 65-67 is too much to ask, also keeping in mind I have wool socks , pants, and a t-shirt on.

So what's your's on?

Editted to add my roommate's comment: "Also include we have baseboard heating!"

We're looking to tough it out this winter and probably upgrade to oil filled space heaters before next fall.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:31:30 PM EDT
It's warm here in AZ this winter, but the heat is on around 73.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:31:43 PM EDT
65
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:31:57 PM EDT
I try to keep it on 65.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:33:12 PM EDT
It cold here in FL right now, we keep the heat at 72...
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:33:41 PM EDT
60 during the day if nobody's home then up to 65. I'll usually crank it up to 68 before I hop in the shower so the bathroom feels nice and toasty when I get out
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:34:02 PM EDT
I heat with wood in an old Ashley woodburning heater. Most of the time I keep it about 72-76 by opening a window or not.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:34:11 PM EDT
70
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:44:43 PM EDT
72 now, will bump it down to 65 at bedtime.

Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:45:47 PM EDT
Mine has not gone above 60 all season, and is on 55 when I leave. Can't afford it.

What school do you go to?
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:46:15 PM EDT
72 pretty much all the time in winter months.

Danny
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:46:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:47:00 PM EDT
87
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:47:30 PM EDT
It's on high. My landlord pays for the heat.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:47:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 3:55:32 PM EDT by Engineer]


and I'm comfy. I just happen to like it cold. You don't want to see my AC bill in the summer.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:48:30 PM EDT
64 is just right.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:49:08 PM EDT
68
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:53:40 PM EDT
65 day
50 night
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:54:29 PM EDT
In the hotel here in NY, I got it set to low fan, mid way through the red part of the heater dealie.

At home in TX, we haven't had the furnace on all year. Not once. Sweaters, electric blankets, and, the fireplace.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:54:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:56:02 PM EDT
Mine's on the wall.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:56:46 PM EDT
72
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:56:51 PM EDT
68° day and night.

64° if I leave for more than a few hours.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:57:29 PM EDT
67 when I'm home, 57 when I'm not
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:58:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By npd233:
Mine's on the wall.


^ lol
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:01:09 PM EDT
69
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:01:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 4:02:20 PM EDT by diabolical_chicken]

Originally Posted By npd233:
Mine's on the wall.



so is mine


we keep it about 68 in the evening or when we are both home--lowered to 60-65 at night--we got a down comforter before christmas and we sweat like crazy if its any higher than that in here at night


make a poll
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:03:01 PM EDT
Its off
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:07:17 PM EDT
Wife and I fight over the thermostat.

She likes it cold (alike her persona)
she likes it around 68f

I like it warm (just the opposite).
I like it around 72f
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:08:56 PM EDT
72-74
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:09:55 PM EDT
Wish everyone would put their age besides the temp setting. Seems like the older folks like to heat it up too much. I'm 48 & keep the temp. on 60 at night and 63 during the day.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:14:20 PM EDT
I haven't had to turn on the furnace so far, I'm in So. Calif San Gabriel Valley(10 miles e. of L.A.). We are in a Santa Ana condition right now. It is real warm like low 70s in the afternoons, and windy in some areas. We have a raging brush fire being wiped by high winds in Orange County, about 30 miles SE of Los Angeles. Furnance is off, no need.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:18:38 PM EDT
80°.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:22:09 PM EDT
65-66 when we are up, and 60-61 at night when we go to bed.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:22:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 4:37:57 PM EDT by JustinOK34]
At home - 67
At work - 60
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:25:21 PM EDT
Daytime: 64
Overnight: 59
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:28:18 PM EDT
73 or 74.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:29:59 PM EDT
my thermostat is on 65 year round
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:48:12 PM EDT
I don't see how having your thermostat set lower saves money.

Say you have 2 houses. You set one at 70 and the other at 75 and turn them both on. Obviously from the get-go the furnace in the 75 house will have to run longer. That makes sense. Once they have both reached their top temperature I don't see how it costs more to maintain one over the other.

Now after X amount of minutes say the temperature drops one degree in both houses so the furnace kicks on. They both run for X amount of minutes to make up that lost degree. How can that not cost the same?

Does a furnace somehow have to run longer to go from 74-75 than 69-70? If so why?

Does the one degree between 75 and 74 somehow escape your house faster than the one degree between 70 and 69 causing the furnace to run more often? If so why?
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:49:29 PM EDT
I live in a dorm so the heating is free but my room mate and I normally just turn it up to about 58. We both get uncomfortably warm anywhere near 70. My first night here I forgot to turn the heater on and it was 45 when I woke up, so I turned it to 55.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:59:30 PM EDT
Its set to 69 but the wood burner keeps it at 75
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:02:04 PM EDT
70 winter 75 summer
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:04:54 PM EDT
... no thermostat

Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:05:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 5:06:56 PM EDT by Engineer]

Originally Posted By SUPERSPORT:
I don't see how having your thermostat set lower saves money.

Say you have 2 houses. You set one at 70 and the other at 75 and turn them both on. Obviously from the get-go the furnace in the 75 house will have to run longer. That makes sense. Once they have both reached their top temperature I don't see how it costs more to maintain one over the other.

Now after X amount of minutes say the temperature drops one degree in both houses so the furnace kicks on. They both run for X amount of minutes to make up that lost degree. How can that not cost the same?

Does a furnace somehow have to run longer to go from 74-75 than 69-70? If so why?

Does the one degree between 75 and 74 somehow escape your house faster than the one degree between 70 and 69 causing the furnace to run more often? If so why?



Consider the temperature gradient between your house and the outside in the two scenarios and then look at a heat conduction equation. You'll see which of your assumptions isn't quite right.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:06:19 PM EDT
Its turned off and the windows are open.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:14:05 PM EDT
60 at night lots lower during the day
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:16:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Engineer:

Consider the temperature gradient between your house and the outside in the two scenarios and then look at a heat conduction equation. You'll see which of your assumptions isn't quite right.



Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:24:59 PM EDT
Mine's off.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:29:19 PM EDT
about 62
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:27:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SUPERSPORT:

Originally Posted By Engineer:

Consider the temperature gradient between your house and the outside in the two scenarios and then look at a heat conduction equation. You'll see which of your assumptions isn't quite right.






If you could basically have a timer in each house. Start timer once ideal temperature is reached. The house with the greater temperature difference from inside to outside will cool down quicker (assuming all other things equal) than the house with the lesser difference.

Therefore heater turns on sooner in house with greater differential. Process will repeat all day long, and basically, this house will require the heater to be on more than the house with less differential.


Wait a sec, now that I'm thinking about it, I dunno anymore. Oh jeez. Now I feel like an idiot. Can we get an expert opinion here???
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:31:44 PM EDT
got a 180 in the Jeep.


68
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