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Posted: 2/6/2006 9:49:23 PM EDT
BBC NEWS
New species found in Papua 'Eden'
A team of international scientists say they have found a "lost World" in an Indonesian jungle, home to dozens of new species of animals and plants.

"It's as close to the Garden of Eden as you're going to find on Earth," said Bruce Beehler, co-leader of the team.

The scientists claim to have discovered 20 frog species, four butterfly species and at least five new types of palms.

But their discoveries will have to be reviewed by peers before being officially classified as new species.

The team - from the US, Indonesia and Australia - surveyed a region near the Foja Mountains in Papua province in eastern Indonesia, which covers an area of more than a million hectares (two million acres) of forest.

"There was not a single trail, no sign of civilisation, no sign of even local communities ever having been there," Mr Beehler told the Associated Press.

He said that even two local tribesmen, who accompanied the scientists, were astonished at the area's isolation.

"As far as they knew, neither of their clans had ever been to the area," Mr Beehler said.

Unafraid of humans

One of the team's most remarkable discoveries was a honey-eater bird with a bright orange patch on its face - the first new bird species to be sighted in the area for more than 60 years.

They also found a Golden-Mantled Tree Kangaroo, which was previously thought to have been hunted to near-extinction, and took the first known photographs of the Berlepsch's Six-Wired Bird of Paradise, first described by hunters in the 19th Century.

Mr Beehler said some of the creatures the team came into contact with were remarkably unafraid of humans.

Two Long-Beaked Echidnas, primitive egg-laying mammals, even allowed scientists to pick them up and bring them back to their camp to be studied, he added.

The December 2005 expedition was organised by the US-based organisation Conservation International, together with the Indonesian Institute of Sciences.

The team admit that in their month-long trip, they did not have enough time to survey the area completely.

"We just scratched the surface," Mr Beehler told reporters. "Anyone who goes there will come back with a mystery."

Mr Beehler himself hopes to return later this year.
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/4688000.stm

Published: 2006/02/07 05:51:41 GMT

© BBC MMVI
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:18:58 PM EDT
Did they find any "hobbits"?
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:36:33 PM EDT
New birds? I wonder how they taste.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:01:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tomislav:
New birds? I wonder how they taste.




Like chicken.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:10:38 AM EDT
Papua? New Guinea???
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:17:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By inferno715:
Papua? New Guinea???



No, Papua, New Jersey.

Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:33:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 12:34:20 AM EDT by desertmoon]

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By inferno715:
Papua? New Guinea???



No, Papua, New Jersey.




don't forget there's a Papau, Texas, too.....

just kidding


In WWII my grandfather and members of his Infantry unit actually lived with natives in New Guinea...the pictures were like something from the stone age.....I have been trying to coax them from my Uncle for the past year or two so I can scan them and post them. As I recall, much of the stuff is National Geographic Quality, he was a VERY good photographer.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:58:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By inferno715:
Papua? New Guinea???



No, Papua, New Jersey.




Thanks ya ass. I wasn't sure since it said "Indonesia".

My grandfather was in Port Moresby and Nadzab during 43-44.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 11:46:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 12:01:23 PM EDT by 71-Hour_Achmed]
Here's what I've found so far:



Undated photo of the 'Berlepsch's six-wired bird of paradise', rediscovered during an expedition to the Foja mountains in the west of New Guinea in Indonesia. (Bruce Beehler/Reuters)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/photos_ts/2006_02_07t001259_450x300_us_environment_species




In this undated photo released by Conservation International, long-beaked echidna (Zaglossus bruijni) is seen discovered Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foya Mountains in Indonesia's easternmost Papua province in November-December 2005. Scientists surveying an isolated Indonesian jungle discovered dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants, and glimpsed large mammals that have been hunted to near-extinction elsewhere, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2006. (AP Photo/Conservation International, Stephen Richards, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak10102070447




In this undated photo released by Conservation International, Berlepsch's six-wired 'lost' bird of paradise is seen after being rediscovered on the Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foya Mountains in Indonesia's easternmost Papua province in November-December 2005. Scientists surveying an isolated Indonesian jungle discovered dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants, and glimpsed large mammals that have been hunted to near-extinction elsewhere, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2006. (AP Photo/Conservation International, Bruce Beehler, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak10202070453




In this undated photo released by Conservation International, an undescribed species (Albericus sp.) is seen discovered Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foya Mountains in Indonesia's easternmost Papua province in November-December 2005. Scientists surveying an isolated Indonesian jungle discovered dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants, and glimpsed large mammals that have been hunted to near-extinction elsewhere, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2006. (AP Photo/Conservation International, Stephen Richards, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak10302070448




In this undated photo released by Conservation International, an undescribed species (Callulops sp.) is seen discovered Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foya Mountains in Indonesia's easternmost Papua province in November-December 2005. Scientists surveying an isolated Indonesian jungle discovered dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants, and glimpsed large mammals that have been hunted to near-extinction elsewhere, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2006. (AP Photo/Conservation International, Stephen Richards, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak10402070449




In this undated photo released by Conservation International, a new species of Smoky honeyeater is seen discovered on the Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foya Mountains of Papua province, Indonesia, November-December 2005. Scientists surveying an isolated Indonesian jungle discovered dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants, and glimpsed large mammals that have been hunted to near-extinction elsewhere, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2006. (AP Photo/Conservation International, Bruce Beehler, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak10602070530




In this undated photo released by Conservation International, a golden-mantled tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus pulcherrimus) is seen after being discovered on Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foya Mountains in Indonesia's easternmost Papua province in December 2005. Scientists discovered a 'Lost World' in an isolated Indonesian jungle, identifying dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants _ as well as large mammals hunted to near extinction elsewhere, members of the expedition said Tuesday, Feb. 7 2006. This was first record of the species in Indonesia and the second known site on earth where it is known to exist. (AP Photo/Conservation International, Bruce Beehler, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak10902070839


In this undated photo released by Conservation International, a golden-fronted bowerbird, (Amblyornis flavifrons), is seen on Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foja Mountains in Indonesia's easternmost Papua province in December 2005. Scientists discovered a 'Lost World' in an isolated Indonesian jungle, identifying dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants _ as well as large mammals hunted to near extinction elsewhere, members of the expedition said Tuesday. This was believed to be the first photographic record of the species. (AP Photo/Conservation International, Bruce Beehler, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak11402071004




This undated photo released by Conservation International shows what is believed to be a new species of treefrog discovered on Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foya Mountains in Indonesia's easternmost Papua province in December 2005. Scientists discovered a 'Lost World' in an isolated Indonesian jungle, identifying dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants _ as well as large mammals hunted to near extinction elsewhere, members of the expedition said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Conservation International, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak12302071336


In this undated photo released by Conservation International, mammal expert Kris Helgen is seen holding a golden-mantled tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus pulcherrimus) discovered on Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition to the Foya Mountains in Indonesia's easternmost Papua province in December 2005. Scientists discovered a 'Lost World' in an isolated Indonesian jungle, identifying dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants _ as well as the large mammal hunted to near extinction elsewhere, members of the expedition said Tuesday. This was first record of the species in Indonesia and the second known site on earth where it is known to exist. (AP Photo/Conservation International, HO)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/481/jak12502071357




"Giant White" Rhododendron, a species yet to be described, possibly the largest of any rhododendron species in the world, seen on the Conservation International Rapid Assessment Program expedition to the Foja Mountains in Papua, Indonesia, on the island of New Guinea.(AFP/CI-HO/Wayne Takeuchi)
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/photos_ts_wl_afp/060207174657_j9lnokc2_photo2




Undated photo of Bruce Beehler, co-leader of an expedition, studying a female 'Berlepsch's Six-Wired Bird of Paradise' in the west of New Guinea in Indonesia. Scientists said on Tuesday they had found a 'Lost World' in an Indonesian mountain jungle, home to dozens of exotic new species of birds, butterflies, frogs and plants. The U.S., Indonesian and Australian expedition took photographs of the 'Berlepsch's six-wired bird of paradise', which appears in 19th century collections but whose home had previously been unknown. The bird is named after six fine feathers on the head of the male which can be raised and shaken in courtship displays. NO ARCHIVES NO SALES REUTERS/Handout
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/ids_photos_wl/r1528369061.jpg




Undated photo of the 'Berlepsch's six-wired bird of paradise', rediscovered during an expedition to the Foja mountains in the west of New Guinea in Indonesia. Scientists said on Tuesday they had found a 'Lost World' in an Indonesian mountain jungle, home to dozens of exotic new species of birds, butterflies, frogs and plants. The U.S., Indonesian and Australian expedition took photographs of the 'Berlepsch's six-wired bird of paradise', which appears in 19th century collections but whose home had previously been unknown. The bird is named after six fine feathers on the head of the male which can be raised and shaken in courtship displays. REUTERS/Bruce Beehler
news.yahoo.com/photo/060207/ids_photos_ts/ra3276551223.jpg
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 11:54:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 11:56:00 AM EDT by warlord]
Wow, that is interesting, but I think the humans shouldn't handle the animals unless absolutely necessary, you never know what type of bacteria, viruses that can be transmitted to humans or from humans to animal.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:02:12 PM EDT
No Dinosaurs?
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:09:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cetme1:
No Dinosaurs?



I'd be more worried about King Kong. He's badass.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:10:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By inferno715:
Papua? New Guinea???



No, Papua, New Jersey.




Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:14:26 PM EDT
I have a question...

Are these new species or just new breeds?

A bird is a bird, right? A frog is a frog, right?

Or do I not remember biology class
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:28:16 PM EDT
Sweet, let's a build a hotel right in the middle of that jungle! I know we can charge $2000+ a night so they can walk around and be photographed pretending to save the forest.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:28:25 PM EDT
I want one as a pet.... that thing looks awesome.





- BG
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:28:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ZitiForBreakfast:
I have a question...

Are these new species or just new breeds?

A bird is a bird, right? A frog is a frog, right?

Or do I not remember biology class






www.palaeos.com/Systematics/Linnean/Linnean.htm
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