Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 2/6/2006 5:00:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 7:01:30 PM EDT by greenranger]
THIS IS BS, GO TO UPDATE POST BELOW!!

I have a relative in her EARLY 20's that has been diagnosed with breast cancer. She is kind of in LA-LA land about what all the doctor's told her. They told her it was a level 4-a cancer--what does that mean and how serious is it?

Thanks,

GR
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:05:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/6/2006 5:10:48 PM EDT by EPOCH96]
a good place to start...

www.cancer.gov

Cancer Terms Dictionary

EPOCH



ETA:

A better site


The term, metastatic, describes a cancer that has spread to distant organs from the original tumor site. Metastatic breast cancer is the most advanced stage (stage IV) of breast cancer. Cancer cells have spread past the breast and axillary (underarm) lymph nodes to other areas of the body where they continue to grow and multiply. Breast cancer has the potential to spread to almost any region of the body. The most common region breast cancer spreads to is bone, followed by lung and liver. Treatment of metastatic breast cancer generally focuses on relieving symptoms and extending a woman’s lifetime.



comfort your friend, don't give up hope, but prepare yourself for the worse...
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:08:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By EPOCH96:
a good place to start...

www.cancer.gov

Cancer Terms Dictionary

EPOCH







In stage IV, the cancer has spread to other organs of the body, most often the bones, lungs, liver, or brain.



Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:08:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:11:10 PM EDT
sorry... bad news.

Stage IV
The cancer has spread to other organs of the body, most often the bones, lungs, liver, or brain. Or, tumor has spread locally to the skin and lymph nodes inside the neck, near the collarbone.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inflammatory breast cancer
Inflammatory breast cancer is a special class of breast cancer that is rare. The breast looks as if it is inflamed because of its red appearance and warmth. The skin may show signs of ridges and wheals or it may have a pitted appearance. Inflammatory breast cancer tends to spread quickly.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Recurrent
Recurrent disease means that the cancer has come back (recurred) after it has been treated. It may come back in the breast, in the soft tissues of the chest (the chest wall), or in another part of the body.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TREATMENT OPTION OVERVIEW
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How breast cancer is treated

There are treatments for all patients with breast cancer. Four types of treatment are used:

surgery (taking out the cancer in an operation)
radiation therapy (using high-dose x-rays to kill cancer cells)
chemotherapy (using drugs to kill cancer cells)
hormone therapy (using drugs that change the way hormones work or taking out organs that make hormones, such as the ovaries)

Biological therapy (using the body's immune system to fight cancer), bone marrow transplantation, and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation are being tested in clinical trials.
Most patients with breast cancer have surgery to remove the cancer from the breast. Usually, some of the lymph nodes under the arm are also taken out and looked at under a microscope to see if there are any cancer cells.

Different types of operations used:

Surgery to conserve the breast:

Lumpectomy (sometimes called excisional biopsy or wide excision) is the
removal of the lump in the breast and some of the tissue around it. It is
usually followed by radiation therapy to the part of the breast that
remains. Most doctors also take out some of the lymph nodes under the arm.
Partial or segmental mastectomy is the removal of the cancer as well as some
of the breast tissue around the tumor and the lining over the chest muscles
below the tumor. Usually some of the lymph nodes under the arm are taken
out. In most cases, radiation therapy follows.


Other types of surgery:


Total or simple mastectomy is the removal of the whole breast. Sometimes
lymph nodes under the arm are also taken out.
Modified radical mastectomy is the removal of the breast, many of the lymph
nodes under the arm, the lining over the chest muscles, and sometimes part
of the chest wall muscles. This is the most common operation for breast
cancer.

Radical mastectomy (also called the Halsted radical mastectomy) is the
removal of the breast, chest muscles, and all of the lymph nodes under the
arm. For many years, this was the operation most used, but it is used now
only when the tumor has spread to the chest muscles.


Radiation therapy is the use of high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Radiation may come from a machine outside the body (external radiation therapy) or from putting materials that produce radiation (radioisotopes) through thin plastic tubes into the area where the cancer cells are found (internal radiation therapy).
Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy may be taken by mouth or it may be put into the body by inserting a needle into a vein or muscle. Chemotherapy is called a systemic treatment because the drugs enter the bloodstream, travel through the body, and can kill cancer cells outside the breast area.

If tests show that the breast cancer cells have estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors, hormone therapy may be given. Hormone therapy is used to change the way hormones in the body help cancers grow. This may be done by using drugs that change the way hormones work or by surgery to take out organs that make hormones, such as the ovaries. Hormone therapy with tamoxifen is often given to patients with early stages of breast cancer. Hormone therapy with tamoxifen or estrogens can act on cells all over the body and may increase the chance of getting cancer of the uterus. A doctor should be seen for a pelvic examination every year. Any vaginal bleeding, other than menstrual bleeding, should be reported to a doctor as soon as possible.

Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the operation, the patient may be given radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy after surgery to try to kill any cancer cells that may be left. Therapy given after an operation when there are no cancer cells that can be seen is called adjuvant therapy.

Biological therapy tries to get the body to fight cancer. It uses materials made by the body or made in a laboratory to boost, direct, or restore the body's natural defenses against disease. Biological therapy is sometimes called biological response modifier (BRM) therapy or immunotherapy. This treatment is currently only being given in clinical trials.

Bone marrow transplantation is a newer type of treatment that is being studied in clinical trials. Sometimes breast cancer becomes resistant to treatment with radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Very high doses of chemotherapy may then be used to treat the cancer. Because the high doses of chemotherapy can destroy the bone marrow, marrow is taken from the bones before treatment. The marrow is then frozen and the patient is given high-dose chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy to treat the cancer. The marrow that was taken out is then thawed and given back to the patient through a needle inserted into a vein to replace the marrow that was destroyed. This type of transplant is called an autologous transplant. If the marrow that is given is taken from another person, the transplant is called an allogeneic transplant.

Another type of autologous transplant is called a peripheral blood stem cell transplant. The patient's blood is passed through a machine that removes the stem cells (immature cells from which all blood cells develop) and then returns the blood back to the patient. This procedure is called leukapheresis and usually takes 3 or 4 hours to complete. The stem cells are treated with drugs to kill any cancer cells and then frozen until they are transplanted back to the patient.

Sorry.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:15:31 PM EDT
GreenRanger, before anyone gets too excited, has she had a diagnosis confirmation from another surgeon? to have a significantly metastasized cancer at her age is VERY VERY rare, and she would have had to ignore some serious symptoms for a while for it to get that way.

Make sure you have the story right.

OTOH, if true, she is in for a very rough road in the immediate future, and she will need all the support you and her friends can give.

Good Luck, and best wishes to her.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:19:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fish223:
GreenRanger, before anyone gets too excited, has she had a diagnosis confirmation from another surgeon? to have a significantly metastasized cancer at her age is VERY VERY rare, and she would have had to ignore some serious symptoms for a while for it to get that way.

Make sure you have the story right.

OTOH, if true, she is in for a very rough road in the immediate future, and she will need all the support you and her friends can give.

Good Luck, and best wishes to her.



Fish,

She ignored it for a while. She is one of those "It won't happen to me" people.

To give you an idea of how she is, she was told to get an appt with a surgeon by her doctor. She has an appt. aTWO WEEKS OUT! We tried to tell her the doctor could get her an appt. QUICK if she had let them get the appt for her. She is supposed to get in contact with them tomorrow, hopefully, to get the appt. moved up.

She said when she had the sonogram (or whatever they do to check it and look at it) it was large and totally red in color. Whatever that means.

GR
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:21:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 50cal:
My wife is in the medical field.

She asked, is the cancer metastisized? The missus says 4A is bad. Really bad.
If it has metastisized, she may count her life span in weeks/months.

Sorry to hear it.



I woke the wife up and she said she didn't know if it was metastisized or not. Maybe we can find out tomorrow.

GR
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:24:00 PM EDT
I agree that this story may be incomplete not to mention oftentimes people don't really get the story straight.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:31:09 PM EDT
OK GreenRanger, based on your last post, I'm going to make an assumption, but I think I am going to be spot on.

It sounds like she had a lump that her primary confirmed, and sent her for a mammogram and possibly a breast sonogram, which confirmed a lesion of suspicious nature.

Now she has an appointment for a surgeon to check her, and he will do a biopsy to determine whether or not in fact she has a malignancy, or just a benign tumor/cyst/inflammation, and what should happen next.

The only way she could already have been diagnoseed with metastatic CA is by a full-body CT scan to note tumors elsewhere in the body. First come tumor, then local invasion, then spread to local lymphatics, then travel elsewhere in the body.

I can only speak for myself, but when I have a suspicious lesion outside of my specialty, I will personally make an appointment with the proper guy for the job before I let the patient out of my office, and I follow it up to it's conclusion.

I don't know your relationship with her, how close you are or whatever, but call her up and tell her to do it tomorrow, by the end ot the week for sure.

If she truly has a cancer, and it is not yet properly diagnosed, every day counts, every one.

good luck.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:33:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By drjarhead:
I agree that this story may be incomplete not to mention oftentimes people don't really get the story straight.



I agree too. The hardheaded WILL NOT allow her mom to go with her to ask the dr. questions, and at her age, the doctor cannot tell her anything. When her mom starts asking questions she stops talking about it.

We did ask her mom and it was the same info she gave us.

FWIW, she has had health problems before, she has some kind of skin condition that is caused by some kind of genetic defect.

GR
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:37:04 PM EDT
Fish, it's my wife's little sister. I am debating letting my wife read these posts, cause she will FREAK OUT. She already knows it's bad, but she is under the impression there are 5 stages of cancer, instead of 4 like the websites say.

Thanks for the info, all of you.

GR
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:38:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 50cal:

The missus says 4A is bad. Really bad.





+1

Good luck to her!
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:41:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By greenranger:
Fish, it's my wife's little sister. I am debating letting my wife read these posts, cause she will FREAK OUT. She already knows it's bad, but she is under the impression there are 5 stages of cancer, instead of 4 like the websites say.

Thanks for the info, all of you.

GR



I believe there are 5, in some..a form of leukemia for example, goes from 0 - I - II - III - IV


0-4 is 5 stages.

Found out about this by researching after my grandfather's leukemia diagnosis.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:41:54 PM EDT
GR,

Do you live anwhere near Savannah?
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:47:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:47:52 PM EDT
Zack,

I stand corrected.

BMICK,

I am near columbus, but my sister in law is in Orlando Florida.

GR
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:53:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/6/2006 5:54:43 PM EDT by greenranger]
I'm going to put my wife on this tomorrow. I almost feel sorry for her when I do that, it would be kind of like sicking a pit bull on her, but she needs it.


OFF TOPIC

She (my wife) publicly cussed out a pharmacist at a walmart, if that gives you any idea. ANd that was on one of her EASY days. Even the other employees at the store were laughing at her!

Again, I feel sorry --in a way--for little sis tomorrow!

GR
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 5:54:14 PM EDT
If she chooses to go the surgical/radiation/chemo route, I would strongly recommend going to one of the cancer centers. They are much better prepared to help/support her. IMHO avoid the "local" hospitals if possible. Cancer centers have more experience at making the patient comfortable. My wife is a 5 year BC(stage 2) survivor. Prayers sent.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 6:01:14 PM EDT
Green--

I'm a podiatry resident (just got done with Radiology and Path/Nuc. Med rotations). From the bit I picked up in rotation, Fish is correct...very rare to be that advanced in someone that young.

The "Red" in the ultrasound was likely a color representation of the blood flow to the area...lots of red = high blood flow (not a good sign).

Did she get any other advanced imaging (PET or CT scan)? Any Biopsy?

If the primary care physician staged the cancer...I would jump on getting a second opinion NOW.

Patient's attitudes play a large part in getting them better...denial now is a bad sign for her. Having her become agressive on getting information, finding apropriate medical treatment now is very important.


she has some kind of skin condition that is caused by some kind of genetic defect.



This can also be the cause of lesions....make sure she has the information on the skin condition and can give it to the surgeon...that may make it look like the lesion has thrown mets.

I would definitely have your wife read the post....And kick her sister's ass (might knock her head out of there).

Good luck...keep us posted.

AFARR
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 6:04:21 PM EDT
Sorry to hear about this.

I have a close friend/girlfriend who is now going through stage IV breast cancer right now.

She has gone through a double mastectomy and is getting the baloons inflated as I type this. It has moved through her lymph system into her abdomen. All this after they did several lumpectomies on her. She has been on radical chemo and radiation for the last few months. All her hair has fallen out - even her eye lashes. They want her to do a hysterectomy pretty soon as well.

She is in Chicago right now being with her daughter and doing the reconstruction and chemo treatments. Makes me angry because I can't be there with her and she can't leave to come back to AZ right now. I miss her greatly and I may never get to see her in person again. She's doing pretty well and they haven't told her she has weeks to live - yet. She has two more months before she can come back here to live with me. She wants to spend as much time with her daughter as she can. I can't blame her.

I really feel that frame of mind can do wonders for your body. If she believes, she can overcome.

God bless and good luck.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:53:43 AM EDT
I talked to my wife this morning. She is going to talk to her Mom about this today and possibly her sister--if she can get her on the phone.


I also forgot to add it is the size of a pea--according to my wife. We also found out my sister in law had cervical cancer some time in the recent past. We were not told of this until this issue came up.


She has the "I'm 21, I can take care of myself now" complex REAL BAD. So that is one reason it is so hard to get her to listen.


GR
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:38:39 AM EDT
Well, that's why I said that something is lacking here.

Pea sized lump = Stage IV Cancer? I don't think so. Might not even be CA at all. Wait and see bud. Point is that I wouldn't get all worked up as yet until you know more. I have never ceased to be amazed at what some people focus in on during our conversations.

Cervical CA?
Takes time to occur after intial infection with HPV. She probably just had an abnormal PAP. Or not....

Is she a flake?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 3:57:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By drjarhead:

Is she a flake?




Ain't that redundant, sir??????
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:52:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By drjarhead:

Is she a flake?




Ain't that redundant, sir??????



Link Posted: 2/16/2006 6:58:34 PM EDT
UPDATE!!!!!!!!!!!!
OK she goes to the Surgeon today and it's not even cancerous. It is some kind of mass that has to come out, but it is not life threatening. WHY DO WOMEN MAKE THIS CRAP UP?? MY WIFE WAS WORRIED SICK ABOUT THIS!!!! Not to mention I feel like a fool for putting it here and it not being true.

My apologies to everyone that read this or replied to it. Sorry you wasted the keystrokes and clicks.

What a piece of work. We put her on the prayer list at church and everything, and she is so idiotic and childish to be telling this as the truth.

Give me a freaking break. Never believe a WORD out of her mouth again. EVER!!!

not that I wish it was cancer, but from a high stage to NOTHING?? What an idiotic thing to do!

GR
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:00:35 PM EDT
well it looks like drjarheads diagnosis of 'flake' turned out to be correct.

Impressive - not just internet diagnosis, but a correct diagnosis over the internet without ever seeing the patient!
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:06:12 PM EDT
Well at least she is going to live.

Good job drjarhead.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:07:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
Well at least she is going to live.

Good job drjarhead.


Yeah but I have to put up with her from now on............

GR
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:08:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By greenranger:

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
Well at least she is going to live.

Good job drjarhead.


Yeah but I have to put up with her from now on............

GR



Get even.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:11:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By wildearp:

Originally Posted By greenranger:

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
Well at least she is going to live.

Good job drjarhead.


Yeah but I have to put up with her from now on............

GR



Get even.





GR
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:45:34 PM EDT
Glad it is going to turn out ok.

All's well that ends well.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 11:02:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By greenranger:
UPDATE!!!!!!!!!!!!
OK she goes to the Surgeon today and it's not even cancerous. It is some kind of mass that has to come out, but it is not life threatening. WHY DO WOMEN MAKE THIS CRAP UP?? MY WIFE WAS WORRIED SICK ABOUT THIS!!!! Not to mention I feel like a fool for putting it here and it not being true.

What a piece of work. We put her on the prayer list at church and everything, and she is so idiotic and childish to be telling this as the truth.


Prayer works! De Lawd has HEALED her! Praise Jeebus, hallelujiah!

Ok, just kidding, there is no god, it's all a fraud and a con. Carry on.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 4:19:37 AM EDT
I have been wondering if the "Stage" information on the various websites, whether government or university, are absolute, and as simple as they sound, or if they have made them simplistic for those with limited knowledge. My wife is getting chemo right now. She has colon cancer which has metasticized to the liver and slightly to the lungs. If the flowcharts or staging tables are as simple as they seem, then metasticized=Stage IV. But, the doctors are all saying that the liver involovement is quite common and "will be cleared up by the chemo." ANd, the chemo is at a lower dose for a longer period of time (18 treatments - 6 on 2 off, etc.). No one is alerting us to the possibilities, just making it sem ok. Of course, I encourage that feeling in my wife, and tell her she is getting better each time, the mind helps too. But, I have to wonder that, if it's Stage IV, what's really going on. Is it just palliative, and they're not telling us, or is the Stage IV classification more complex than it is made to seem?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 4:30:06 AM EDT
Drjarhead for President!!!
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 6:55:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2006 7:06:29 AM EDT by fish223]

Originally Posted By rjroberts:
I have been wondering if the "Stage" information on the various websites, whether government or university, are absolute, and as simple as they sound, or if they have made them simplistic for those with limited knowledge. My wife is getting chemo right now. She has colon cancer which has metasticized to the liver and slightly to the lungs. If the flowcharts or staging tables are as simple as they seem, then metasticized=Stage IV. But, the doctors are all saying that the liver involovement is quite common and "will be cleared up by the chemo." ANd, the chemo is at a lower dose for a longer period of time (18 treatments - 6 on 2 off, etc.). No one is alerting us to the possibilities, just making it sem ok. Of course, I encourage that feeling in my wife, and tell her she is getting better each time, the mind helps too. But, I have to wonder that, if it's Stage IV, what's really going on. Is it just palliative, and they're not telling us, or is the Stage IV classification more complex than it is made to seem?



Part of your confusion is based on the simple fact that each individual cancer has it own staging protocol, and even the same cancer can have more than one staging protocol, based on a particular country, institution, or researcher. There are changes in staging that may or may not be represented in a current or out-dated protocol. To make it even more complicated, Differences at the cellular level in cancer (i.e. skin cancer can be basal cell, squamuos cell, melanoma, etc) will behave differently (aggressive, less agressive) and might technically be staged the same. Some subtypes may be more amenable to radiation, to chemo, or to surgery, or some combination.

It is fair to say that cancer is a many faceted beast, and has a wide range of expression. It is confusing to the people who study it too.

ETA: I doubt very much that the are not telling you the real deal. There is a huge liability issue for providers in not laying it all on the line. In fact, the trend in my neck of the woods has been to make things seem a little worse than they really are. Cuts down on lawsuits.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:05:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
Drjarhead for President!!!



Hey, it's Emperor or nothing!

I want to be corrupted absolutely

But let's see how it all ends up.
Believe me, I have a LOT of experience with flakes. WTF is it with women and medical shit. Combine medicine and drama queen bullshit and it is a guarantee of ridiculous assumtpions.

You should see how many women get downright pissed when you happily tell them they do not have the fatal illness they have imagined for themselves. I cannot tell you how many times I have checked someone over, even done an unnecessary workup to verify the lack of problem, only to have them turn into Satan herself when told they are okay. It is really something to behold.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:19:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By drjarhead:

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By drjarhead:

Is she a flake?




Ain't that redundant, sir??????











ibttpl
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:06:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By drjarhead:

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
Drjarhead for President!!!



Hey, it's Emperor or nothing!

I want to be corrupted absolutely

But let's see how it all ends up.
Believe me, I have a LOT of experience with flakes. WTF is it with women and medical shit. Combine medicine and drama queen bullshit and it is a guarantee of ridiculous assumtpions.

You should see how many women get downright pissed when you happily tell them they do not have the fatal illness they have imagined for themselves. I cannot tell you how many times I have checked someone over, even done an unnecessary workup to verify the lack of problem, only to have them turn into Satan herself when told they are okay. It is really something to behold.



After 30 some odd years of living I have come to the conclusion that one could take a woman's vagina and attach it to a totally straight telephone pole and within 24 hours the pole would be twisted like a pretzel.

GR
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:53:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
Well at least she is going to live.



Until her sister gets ahold of her...
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 5:39:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fish223:

Originally Posted By rjroberts:
I have been wondering if the "Stage" information on the various websites, whether government or university, are absolute, and as simple as they sound, or if they have made them simplistic for those with limited knowledge. My wife is getting chemo right now. She has colon cancer which has metasticized to the liver and slightly to the lungs. If the flowcharts or staging tables are as simple as they seem, then metasticized=Stage IV. But, the doctors are all saying that the liver involovement is quite common and "will be cleared up by the chemo." ANd, the chemo is at a lower dose for a longer period of time (18 treatments - 6 on 2 off, etc.). No one is alerting us to the possibilities, just making it sem ok. Of course, I encourage that feeling in my wife, and tell her she is getting better each time, the mind helps too. But, I have to wonder that, if it's Stage IV, what's really going on. Is it just palliative, and they're not telling us, or is the Stage IV classification more complex than it is made to seem?



Part of your confusion is based on the simple fact that each individual cancer has it own staging protocol, and even the same cancer can have more than one staging protocol, based on a particular country, institution, or researcher. There are changes in staging that may or may not be represented in a current or out-dated protocol. To make it even more complicated, Differences at the cellular level in cancer (i.e. skin cancer can be basal cell, squamuos cell, melanoma, etc) will behave differently (aggressive, less agressive) and might technically be staged the same. Some subtypes may be more amenable to radiation, to chemo, or to surgery, or some combination.

It is fair to say that cancer is a many faceted beast, and has a wide range of expression. It is confusing to the people who study it too.

ETA: I doubt very much that the are not telling you the real deal. There is a huge liability issue for providers in not laying it all on the line. In fact, the trend in my neck of the woods has been to make things seem a little worse than they really are. Cuts down on lawsuits.



thanks very much for the encouraging explanation. Obviously the differentiated/undifferentiated , cell type, etc. is beyond my ability to analyze, not having gone to medical school, so anything on the websites would be beyond me. But, the websites made it so ominous: Imagine a site saying stage IV simply as a consequence of having metasaticized then, later on in the site, "palliative" is indicated (implicitly the only treatment), and a mean life expectancy (the statistical meanings are something at least I do understand).

One of the assistants in the Dr.'s office, whose function seems to be somewhat of a counseling role, talked to my wife last week. Generally asked how things were going. But, during the conversation indicated that this sort of condition can't really be "cured" (I assume she meant complete remission), but can be treated to keep it from progressing further; and, that the treatments could go to 36 instead of 18. I don't know if she was talking general case, or if this was related specifically to my wife's tests and treament. If related, it would imply she won't get better, which hurts.

We'll see. She has chemo #5 on Fri. I assume they will do some more detailed tests, such as CT or MRI after #6 to see if the jungle juice (5-FU and Leukovarin) is working.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 5:48:21 AM EDT
My wife, too, had a resurgence after almost 5 years after it had been in remission.

From my soul, I pray for the both of you.

Ed
Top Top