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Posted: 2/1/2006 2:05:30 PM EDT
Snow chains, what are they good for and how do they work? I live in the south so I've had no experience. I will be moving up north and I'm wondering if I should get some.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:06:22 PM EDT
Put em on in November and take em off in March!!
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:08:45 PM EDT
Well, let's see here:

1. Illegal in many states because they tear up the road.
2. Not necessary if the state plows and salts the road.
3. Pain in the ass to put on.
4. Using them on dry pavement will chew up your tires.
5. You can't drive very fast with them, lest ye fuck your tires or chains.
6. They don't last very long.
7. Did I mention they were a pain in the ass?

Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:10:03 PM EDT
yer from Bama
If you need chains, stay home!
them yankees are gonna run yer ass off the road!
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:10:26 PM EDT
Get a 4WD vehicle.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:14:59 PM EDT
Wow. So. How does one drive in snow and ice?


Must stay with 2wd. No money.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:17:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Wow. So. How does one drive in snow and ice?



Very carefully.

Are you planning a trip up north?
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:21:51 PM EDT
Gawd. What crappy advice one can get here.

Chains or cables go around your tire. The easy ones have couple of cables that run along the tire on the inside and outside and hook to make circles. Some chains or cables criss-cross between the two circles over the part of the tire that touches the road, so you now have metal to dig into snow or ice and provid traction. A big rubber band tightens them up. If you get easy ones and you aren't an idiot, its simple. They are absolutely necessary in some cases where there is packed snow on hills. On a sloped road with snow, 4WD will put you in a ditch. I highly recommend having some in your car if you are travelling in the North in the winter.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:25:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:
Gawd. What crappy advice one can get here.

Chains or cables go around your tire. The easy ones have couple of cables that run along the tire on the inside and outside and hook to make circles. Some chains or cables criss-cross between the two circles over the part of the tire that touches the road, so you now have metal to dig into snow or ice and provid traction. A big rubber band tightens them up. If you get easy ones and you aren't an idiot, its simple. They are absolutely necessary in some cases where there is packed snow on hills. On a sloped road with snow, 4WD will put you in a ditch. I highly recommend having some in your car if you are travelling in the North in the winter.

............good advice, but most people that live up here don't use chains...studded snow tires is about the max you see.........Chains go on a skidder...................Seriously nobody runs chans to speak of.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:25:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 2:25:59 PM EDT by ChrisLe]

Originally Posted By Outsider_10fp:
yer from Bama
If you need chains, stay home!
them yankees are gonna run yer ass off the road!



You, sir, are a wise man....
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:25:56 PM EDT
What is this "snow" you speak of?

Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:28:22 PM EDT
I live in Michigan. It snows here. I will never have a 2WD vehicle ever again. IMO, in any situation I drive in, 4WD is better by far. I've never been in a ditch,or been stuck since I started four wheelin'
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:29:18 PM EDT
It is really simple. If you have to hang steel on your car, you don't need to be driving it. If you will be living in an area with "long term" snow cover (not typical since some one invented snow plows) then get a spare set of rims from the junkyard or dealer (ask dealer for swaps. When someone orders custom wheels, the cars still come in with stock, and the dealer keeps those to sell cheap.) And put stud tires on
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:37:23 PM EDT
In OR and WA you have to carry chains with you because sometimes they require chains on all vehicles to go over the Mtn passes. If you have an accident when chains could have helped and your chains are not installed, the State Trooper will cite you. I have used chains for many years and they work well for ice. We currently have three light trucks with chains installed for ranch use and one of our fire engines also rolls with chains on during the heavy snow days.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:39:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 2:40:34 PM EDT by IAMLEGEND]
Mandatory on commercial vehicles on many of our mountain passes (like on I-70) frequently during the winter.

Kind of a pain in the ass. Some people run studded tires part of the year instead or just regular all-season tires.

I make do with a 4WD with all-terrain tires.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:42:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Wow. So. How does one drive in snow and ice?


Must stay with 2wd. No money.



Where are you moving too??? can't believe noone asked this yet, front wheel or rear wheel drive, there is a big difference in the snow. FWD is easier for the snow rookies but I drive a 2wd stickshift pickup and I had no problems in the cleveland "lake-effect" snow for years.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:46:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Magurgle:

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Wow. So. How does one drive in snow and ice?


Must stay with 2wd. No money.



Where are you moving too??? can't believe noone asked this yet, front wheel or rear wheel drive, there is a big difference in the snow. FWD is easier for the snow rookies but I drive a 2wd stickshift pickup and I had no problems in the cleveland "lake-effect" snow for years.



+1. My Mustang does just fine if I keep my foot out of it.

I did ask him if he was coming up north to visit.

Hey man, if you do come up, I've got a GREAT tip for ya: Find a big 'ol parking lot and do donuts. Ya it's alot of fun (w00t!), but you'll also get an idea of how your car handles in the snow. IT's a great confidence builder.

Shit, I still do it from time to time. For uh...research and uh...training.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:50:45 PM EDT
From some one that has sold them from a auto parts store-know your tire size,buy ones that are recommended for you car or truck and don't buy the cheap ones,also most places will not give your money back if you don't use them. Tire clearance also makes a difference.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:53:14 PM EDT
Snow chains suck.

They rate alongside freshly oiled whips.

they leave nasty rust stains on the sheets the same way freshly oiled whips leave oil stains.

Rust and oil stains are a bitch to get out of the sheets.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:53:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By krazy_karl:
In OR and WA you have to carry chains with you because sometimes they require chains on all vehicles to go over the Mtn passes. If you have an accident when chains could have helped and your chains are not installed, the State Trooper will cite you. I have used chains for many years and they work well for ice. We currently have three light trucks with chains installed for ranch use and one of our fire engines also rolls with chains on during the heavy snow days.



If I am going to Reno or Tahoe during winter, chains are required. They will not let you pass otherwise. You can get away with 4wd and snow tires most of the time. However, if a big storm hits Donner, you are SOL in your 4wd. They don't call it Sierra Cement for nothing.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:57:05 PM EDT
We really need to know where you might be traveling. They're not legal in every state. They're fine in Ohio, but nobody uses them. As it turns out, somebody invented plows mounted on trucks. They even pay these guys to keep the roads clear.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:02:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 3:12:05 PM EDT by jchewie]

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Wow. So. How does one drive in snow and ice?


Must stay with 2wd. No money.



Slow down. And leave 10 or 15 seconds time between you and the car ahead.

If the snow is hard packed and not icy and the road is straight you can run 35 - 45 mph relatively safely. Maybe a bit faster with the right vehicle (big with front wheel drive).

If it is slushy, icy, not hard packed snow, or the road is not straight you need to slow down even more.

Ice hockey rink style roads are not fun to drive on. If you get going, you will not be able to stop worth a darn. Go slow. Take note of the thermometer reading in the morning - below 20F the salt doesn't work and there may be black ice if the roads were wet the night before. Also be cautious when you see snow blowing its way across the road surface from an adjoining field or open space.

Where are you moving to? Only the coldest parts of the country (next to Canada) get cold enough so there is actually snow on the roads all the time. Most other places - even here in west Michigan - get snow in a snowstorm and no more than two days after the snow stops the roads are clear and dry.

You really do not need tire chains - in Michigan's lower peninsula anyway. I drive a Caprice Classic wagon - 2WD RWD currently, and used to drive a Crown Vic, and before that an Astro van. Just slow down. If you really get a lot of snow, a set of real snow tires (not All Seasons) are great.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:04:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jchewie:

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Wow. So. How does one drive in snow and ice?


Must stay with 2wd. No money.



Slow down.

If the snow is hard packed and not icy and the road is straight you can run 35 - 45 mph relatively safely. Maybe a bit faster with the right vehicle (big with front wheel drive).

If it is slushy, icy, not hard packed snow, or the road is not straight you need to slow down even more.

Ice hockey rink style roads are not fun to drive on. Go slow. Take note of the thermometer reading in the morning - below 20F the salt doesn't work and there may be black ice if the roads were wet the night before.

Where are you moving to? Only the coldest parts of the country (next to Canada) get cold enough so there is actually snow on the roads all the time. Most other places - even here in west Michigan - get snow in a snowstorm and no more than two days after the snow stops the roads are clear and dry.

You really do not need tire chains. I drove a Crown Victoria in Sault Ste Marie for a while, where the roads aren't salted there - the city just puts down some sand for traction.



Agreed on all points. That's about it, folks. Chains really aren't needed up here.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:07:48 PM EDT
chains are a good thing

trust me. You need them.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:14:03 PM EDT
I haven't driven with chains in about twenty years. It's fun, but, if you have to be out with chains, you shouldn't be driving, unless you're in an emergency vehicle.

Oh, also, nobody's mentioned this: don't drive over twenty miles per hour, or you WILL have a bitch of a time putting the chains back on......
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:14:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Wow. So. How does one drive in snow and ice?



Ever seen the Garbage Truck on Ice video? That's about right.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:14:33 PM EDT
Don't stop in the middle of the road and decide you need to put them on right there.

Don't drive 35 on the clear expressway, miles from the nearest snow fall, just because you're too damn lazy to take them off.

I will laugh at you when you tear up the paint job on your late model luxury car because you did not put the snow chains on correctly.

I live in Oregon where chains are legal, and I seen each of these events this year alone.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:19:25 PM EDT
Put a sand bag in your trunk for extra traction (rear wheel drive). You can use sand or kitty litter for extra traction if you get stuck.

Cold weather sucks.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:21:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 3:21:55 PM EDT by 95thFoot]

Originally Posted By TequilaReseva1800:
From some one that has sold them from a auto parts store-know your tire size,buy ones that are recommended for you car or truck and don't buy the cheap ones,also most places will not give your money back if you don't use them. Tire clearance also makes a difference.



Good advice. You might only need chains once every year or so, but you don't want the wrong size or a bum brand to wreck your day and get you stranded.

No fun. BTDT.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:21:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:
chains are a good thing

trust me. You need them.



No, you really don't. They are worthless on ice (ask me how I know), and many parts of the country plow and salt the roads. You'll end up driving on bare pavement, which will eat the chains AND your tires up in a hurry. Places like the Sierras in California are a noted exception - you actually need them there.

I can't think of a single place in the midwest where chains are required - or even helpful. If there is THAT much snow and ice on the ground, you really shouldn't be driving. I lived in the Cleveland area last year - a record year for snow - and I'm telling you, they are absolutely not required.

jchewie nailed it: SLOW DOWN.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:22:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MK4Mod0:

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:
Gawd. What crappy advice one can get here.

Chains or cables go around your tire. The easy ones have couple of cables that run along the tire on the inside and outside and hook to make circles. Some chains or cables criss-cross between the two circles over the part of the tire that touches the road, so you now have metal to dig into snow or ice and provid traction. A big rubber band tightens them up. If you get easy ones and you aren't an idiot, its simple. They are absolutely necessary in some cases where there is packed snow on hills. On a sloped road with snow, 4WD will put you in a ditch. I highly recommend having some in your car if you are travelling in the North in the winter.

............good advice, but most people that live up here don't use chains...studded snow tires is about the max you see.........Chains go on a skidder...................Seriously nobody runs chans to speak of.



+1
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:25:16 PM EDT
I'd rather put on tire chains than be stuck. But hey, thats just me.


I've seen some that are a plastic composite, and strap over your tire in a way you don't have to be rolling to apply them, or to get them tight. Might be the ticket for someone in your situation.

I only use chains to get me unassed in off road situations, in snowmobile parking lots, gravel (in the summer) roads and what not. Never use them on the highway...
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:25:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By gaspain:
chains are a good thing

trust me. You need them.



No, you really don't. They are worthless on ice (ask me how I know), and many parts of the country plow and salt the roads. You'll end up driving on bare pavement, which will eat the chains AND your tires up in a hurry. Places like the Sierras in California are a noted exception - you actually need them there.

I can't think of a single place in the midwest where chains are required - or even helpful. If there is THAT much snow and ice on the ground, you really shouldn't be driving. I lived in the Cleveland area last year - a record year for snow - and I'm telling you, they are absolutely not required.

jchewie nailed it: SLOW DOWN.



All true, but side roads in wooded lonely areas out in Western MA and VT can develop white out conditions some winters pretty quickly. You are truly on your own out there. In some towns, there's no police half the time anyway, no ambulance, so whaddyagonnado if you get stuck? Also, the plows take a looong time to plow out those lonely roads, if at all, since everybody's got a big 4x4 out there. Eastern MA? No chains needed.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:31:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 95thFoot:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By gaspain:
chains are a good thing

trust me. You need them.



No, you really don't. They are worthless on ice (ask me how I know), and many parts of the country plow and salt the roads. You'll end up driving on bare pavement, which will eat the chains AND your tires up in a hurry. Places like the Sierras in California are a noted exception - you actually need them there.

I can't think of a single place in the midwest where chains are required - or even helpful. If there is THAT much snow and ice on the ground, you really shouldn't be driving. I lived in the Cleveland area last year - a record year for snow - and I'm telling you, they are absolutely not required.

jchewie nailed it: SLOW DOWN.



All true, but side roads in wooded lonely areas out in Western MA and VT can develop white out conditions some winters pretty quickly. You are truly on your own out there. In some towns, there's no police half the time anyway, no ambulance, so whaddyagonnado if you get stuck? Also, the plows take a looong time to plow out those lonely roads, if at all, since everybody's got a big 4x4 out there. Eastern MA? No chains needed.



Agreed, hell I keep a set in my car. I haven't used them yet. It's smart to be prepared (you never know). I was just saying that as a general rule, they aren't required or even that helpful in alot of places. The last time I used chains was two years ago, climbing Donner Pass in California. It's steep, the road is full of snow, and Cal DOT mandated it (and for good reason).
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:33:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 3:35:49 PM EDT by metroplex]

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Snow chains, what are they good for and how do they work? I live in the south so I've had no experience. I will be moving up north and I'm wondering if I should get some.



Which state are you moving to?
If its heavy snow, I highly recommend SNOW TIRES on all 4 corners rather than chains. Keep the cable chains for emergencies only. Snow tires from Nov to Apr is a good strategy. Get new snow tires maybe every 3-4 seasons (they are soft and wear faster). Do not fall into the "FWD" hype. You can either select to go with an AWD or 4WD vehicle, but make sure those tires can operate in snow. Sometimes SUVs come with highway all-season tires and they are like car tires. The tread pattern and sipes are designed for rain and dry pavement. Get all-terrain tires for AWD/4WD SUVs/trucks and you won't have a problem with take-off traction or braking. However, turning and changing lanes is another thing...

I have some cable chains for my 2000 Crown Vic. Normally it rides like a slightly firmer/sportier Town Car limo. With the chains, it feels like a M113 or M2 Bradley on the road
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:34:33 PM EDT
You forgot to mention that they go on the tires....
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 3:44:56 PM EDT
Have a set I bought about 7 years ago when I had an old 2wd truck, and barely made enough to support the gf and son, let alone buy a good set of tires for it. I used them 1 season about a half dozen times paired up with about 400lbs of steel in the back.. work was only about 3 miles from the house, they didn't do so hot of a job plowing in that city. but they got me to work and back. I still have them in my basement.

Now I have a 4wd to get to work and back. (18 miles) Best thing I ever did. downshifting and letting the engine slow you down is one if the best ways I found for slowing down or getting down an icy hill.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 4:07:51 PM EDT
I really enjoy the people that drive faster than conditions allow because "they've lived here all their life, and know how to drive in snow". I get great $pleasure$ putting the hook to their car and winching it out of a ditch. Silly bastards.


Link Posted: 2/1/2006 4:13:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 4:14:33 PM EDT by 243savage]
Well. I probably will be moving to Westland, Mi in December. I'll be there all summer, but I won't need them then. Anyways, I'm just preparing my self for what I need when I move.

I drive a 2wd Toyota Tocoma.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 4:14:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
We really need to know where you might be traveling. They're not legal in every state. They're fine in Ohio, but nobody uses them. As it turns out, somebody invented plows mounted on trucks. They even pay these guys to keep the roads clear.




During a good snow we will get a few inches back on the road five minutes after the plow has come and gone.

They are a pain in the ass. Check your owners manual before adding chains. Many cars do not have the fender well clearance to use chains. Cables may work better in this situation, but some cars won't even allow them either.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 5:37:20 PM EDT
I commute the Sierras just east of the Donner Pass. Up here, it is a good idea to keep chains in your vehicle year round because it has been known to snow any month of the year.

Addressing your specific situation, definitely put weight in back over the rear axle. 2-4 sandbags-I keep mine in buckets. There is no vehicle that likes to spin more than an unloaded small truck-which brings up something I didnt see others mention. Speed is your enemy. Next to speed, the brake pedal will cause you grief if you don't know how to use it properly.

If the snowplows leave a berm which you need to cross. slow way down, it can spin you out.

If you find yourself needing chains alot, look at spiders. $300 per axle but can save you alot of hassle.

If you drive in snow, I would reccomend carrying chains or cables even if you think you won't ever need them. You can also get chains made for ice.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:06:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Well. I probably will be moving to Westland, Mi in December. I'll be there all summer, but I won't need them then. Anyways, I'm just preparing my self for what I need when I move.

I drive a 2wd Toyota Tocoma.



I would recommend snow tires from Nov to Apr for any part of MI. When there's a lot of snow overnight, no one plows it and you're stuck with a crappy commute - or take the day off.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:15:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Teach me something about snow chains




Dont put them on the rear tires if you have a front wheel drive car. It happens.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:52:43 PM EDT
If you need chains, you need to stay home.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:57:58 PM EDT
90% of the time [or better] my all season radials are all I need to get around in my front wheel drive car. However there is usually about twice a year when there is packed snow/ice on the road that I am thankful to have my chains. I put them on myself - in fact I've put them on more times then my husband has so they're not too complicated. I suppose I could run studded tires all winter but I get annoyed with the clacking sounds and really only need them occassionally.

When there's more than 5-6 inches of snow on my road I can not get up my hill to my house without chains. The county does not plow our road as its owned by the city. The city does not plow our road as they do not have plow equipment but annexed us in so they can rape tax us.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 7:00:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By gaspain:
chains are a good thing

trust me. You need them.



No, you really don't. They are worthless on ice (ask me how I know), and many parts of the country plow and salt the roads. You'll end up driving on bare pavement, which will eat the chains AND your tires up in a hurry. Places like the Sierras in California are a noted exception - you actually need them there.

I can't think of a single place in the midwest where chains are required - or even helpful. If there is THAT much snow and ice on the ground, you really shouldn't be driving. I lived in the Cleveland area last year - a record year for snow - and I'm telling you, they are absolutely not required.

jchewie nailed it: SLOW DOWN.



GasPain lives in WA, you live in OH.

Washington is full of steep hills and mountains.

Ohio is flat.

Tirechains WILL be handy for him to have access to when needed and if he drives much he WILL have occasion to use them in WA.

Until late 1998 I lived in SE Michigan, tire chains weren't something I ever had occasion to use as standard tires worked well enough on the cars I had, your experience in OH is probably identicle. Here in WA, tire chains do come into use.

GasPain trapped by the snow
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 7:04:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 7:08:38 PM EDT by danpass]

Originally Posted By 243savage:
Wow. So. How does one drive in snow and ice?


Must stay with 2wd. No money.



Grew up in NY and learned to drive in snow/rain with a rearwd V8 Trans Am (red version of Knight Rider car )

I enjoy it (and still do). The only part I never liked about inclement weather was all those pesky other cars that got in the way/ slowed me down

Other than that, have good tires and be diligent with the brakes.

I've also lived in Michigan and I would normally see the police cruisers with chains on the rear wheels.

Another option is these canvas "chains" that wrap around the tire the same way (and of course do the same thing)


edit: I've never used them myself (never had the need)
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 10:23:37 PM EDT
And studded tires are illegal in some places. And they tear up roads too. Like the highway laws in different states, the snow is different in different states. Studs are now legal in CA but don't hack it in the Sierras.

Donner Summit is around 7200+ ft. Lake Tahoe is another 1000 ft higher. Most of the Passes in the Sierras south of Lake Tahoe get closed in October and stay closed into May. Tioga Pass is 9455 ft, Sonora is 9624 ft. And they get heavy wet snow.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 12:48:56 AM EDT
Hey neighbor! I see you are moving to Westland-just down the road a bit from me in Canton. I wouldn't worry too much about winter here. Even the heaviest snowfall is really only a problem for a few hours,and then an army of snowplows swing into action and clear all the streets. You will learn to hate what salt does to your truck,though. They use so much that the roads (and your vehicle) are crusty white with it. Winter has been so mild this year that I have only had one day of heavy snow so far-lots of little dustings of snow that don't amount to anything. You should be fine with a set of snow tires on the back of your truck.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 1:02:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
90% of the time [or better] my all season radials are all I need to get around in my front wheel drive car. However there is usually about twice a year when there is packed snow/ice on the road that I am thankful to have my chains. I put them on myself - in fact I've put them on more times then my husband has so they're not too complicated. I suppose I could run studded tires all winter but I get annoyed with the clacking sounds and really only need them occassionally.

When there's more than 5-6 inches of snow on my road I can not get up my hill to my house without chains. The county does not plow our road as its owned by the city. The city does not plow our road as they do not have plow equipment but annexed us in so they can rape tax us.



Patty: The reason your car cannot handle 5-6" of snow is because of your tires. Normal all-season radials are NOT designed for snow use. The tread compound is too hard, the sipes and tread blocks are not designed to push away the snow. Instead, it clogs up and you lose traction. Snow tires are very soft and are designed with lots and lots of sipe cuts for extra surface area.

Now if you only get snow like maybe 3-10 days out of the entire winter season, it may seem stupid to get snow tires. However, chains really take their toll on your car's suspension and chassis. My car feels like a tracked vehicle when running cable chains (not even the real ones). Notwithstanding, if your chain(s) come loose, they will tear your fender to pieces.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 1:15:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2006 1:56:41 AM EDT by Skammy]

Originally Posted By IchWarrior:
I'd rather put on tire chains than be stuck. But hey, thats just me.


I've seen some that are a plastic composite, and strap over your tire in a way you don't have to be rolling to apply them, or to get them tight. Might be the ticket for someone in your situation.

I only use chains to get me unassed in off road situations, in snowmobile parking lots, gravel (in the summer) roads and what not. Never use them on the highway...



I think I know what your talking about.. They bolt onto a disc that's bolted on your wheels.. and they're expensive

Edit here it is:

www.spikes-spiders.com/

and this looks interesting :

www.autosock.com/

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