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Posted: 1/31/2006 11:49:33 PM EDT

A U.S. Army soldier videotapes another soldier testing an elderly man for explosive residue during a raid in Ramadi, 115 kilometers (70 miles) west of Baghdad, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2006. President Bush rejected calls for withdrawal of troops from Iraq and rebuked critics of his stay-the-course strategy during his State of the Union speech Tuesday night. (AP Photo/Jacob Silberberg)


U.S. Army Staff Sgt. John Dominguez of Johnstown, Ca., stands guard while an Iraq man stands with his hands bound in a corner during a raid by soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division in Ramadi, 115 kilometers (70 miles) west of Baghdad, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2006. President Bush rejected calls for withdrawal of troops from Iraq and rebuked critics of his stay-the-course strategy during his State of the Union speech Tuesday night. (AP Photo/Jacob Silberberg)


A U.S. soldier stands near assorted munitions and bomb making paraphernalia in central Baquba, about 65 km (40 miles) northeast of Baghdad, January 30, 2006. The arms cache was recovered in a house after it was abandoned by insurgents, police said. Picture taken January 30, 2006. REUTERS/Helmiy al-Azawi


British troops secure the scene of a roadside bomb attack on a British patrol, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006, in the southern port city of Um Qasr, 600 kms. (372 miles) south of Baghdad, Iraq. One British soldier was killed in the explosion near the Ten Platforms Port in Iraq's souther port city of Um Qasr, becoming the 100th British soldier to die since the 2003 invasion, the Ministry of Defense said. Three others were injured in the blast. (AP Photo/Nabil al-Jurani)


A British soldier holds a weapon as he and other soldiers secure the scene of a roadside bomb attack targeting British patrol in Um Qasr, an Iraqi port city near Basra, about 600 km (372 miles) south of Baghdad, January 31, 2006. One British soldier was killed in the attack, police said REUTERS/Atef Hassan


Japan's first troops of main contingent soldiers stand in formation upon arrival at the Dutch military base in Samawah, 370 kilometers (230 miles) south of Baghdad, Sunday, Feb. 8, 2004. Japan will begin withdrawing its troops from Iraq in March and complete the pullout by May, ending its largest military mission since the end of World War II, a news report said Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye, File)


Iraqi soldiers from the 5th Brigade hold their weapons during a ceremony of the transition of power at the fortified Green Zone in Baghdad January 31, 2006. A U.S. base camp called Forward Operating Base Camp Honor run by the US soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team of the 4ID has been given back to the Iraqi troops. REUTERS/Ceerwan Aziz


An Israeli soldier stands guards at a checkpoint in the West Bank city of Hebron January 31, 2006. Thousands of Palestinian Muslims gathered under Israeli army control at the Ibrahemi mosque to celebrate the Islamic New Year. REUTERS/Nayef Hashlamoun


Palestinian Fatah militants hold their weapons during a rally in the West Bank city of Nablus, January 31, 2006. (Abed Omar Qusini/Reuters)


Nepalese women walk past security personnel on duty in a street in Bidur, Nuwakot District,some 70 kms north of Kathmandu, 30 January. The United States said that one year of "palace rule" in Nepal has only worsened security in the Himalayan kingdom and boosted Maoist insurgents(AFP/File/Devendra M. Singh)


Indonesian special forces soldiers carry a supposedly killed terrorist during an anti-plane hijacking drill at the Ngurah Rai International Airport in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia, early Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006. Indonesia is gearing up its anti-terror forces as the world's most populous Muslim country has faced a string of terror attacks since 2000. (AP Photo/Ardiles Rante)


Indonesian special forces soldiers frisk passengers during an anti-plane hijacking drill at the Ngurah Rai International Airport in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia, early Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006. Indonesia is gearing up its anti-terror forces as the world's most populous Muslim country has faced a string of terror attacks since 2000. (AP Photo/Ardiles Rante)


Soldiers and police guard onlookers who gathered around the bodies of Philippine communist rebels following an encounter Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006 in the mountains of Santa Ignacia, Tralac province in northern Philippines. At least 18 rebels were killed as soldiers continue to engage the retreating rebels. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)


Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo checks a telescope after viewing a demonstration on hostage recovery and anti-terrorism readiness of the military at Fort Magsaysay in Nueva Ecija, north of Manila January 31, 2006. The Philippine military killed at least 18 suspected members of the communist New People's Army on Tuesday following a rebel attack on a mobile phone tower, officials said. REUTERS/Malacanang Palace Handout/Rodolfo Manabat


A young Karen couple looks on as a Karen National Army soldier practices a close order drill with an M-16 Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006, prior to Revolution Day ceremonies at their camp New Manerplaw, Myanmar. The day marks the 57th anniversary of the Karen's break from the government in Yangon. The 57 year armed resistance is one the longest running rebel insurgency in the world. The Karen are an ethnic minority in Myanmar. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)


Karen National Union (KNU) soldiers wait during celebrations for the 57th anniversary of the army's rebellion against the Myanmar junta at Mu Aye Pu base at the Thai-Myanmar border January 31, 2006. Karen ethnic minority groups have been fighting for autonomy from the Myanmar government in Rangoon since the end of World War Two. The KNU says a chance of peace in Myanmar is far more remote than ever as the current military regime does not want to have peaceful negotiations with ethnic insurgents. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang


Karen National Union (KNU) soldiers parade during celebrations marking the 57th anniversary of the army's rebellion against the Myanmar junta at the Mu Aye Pu base at the Thai-Myanmar border January 31, 2006. Karen ethnic minority groups have been fighting for autonomy from the Myanmar government in Rangoon since the end of World War Two. The KNU says a chance of peace in Myanmar is far more remote than ever as the current military regime does not want to have peaceful negotiations with ethnic insurgents. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang


Karen National Union (KNU) soldiers carry their weapons during celebrations marking the 57th anniversary of the army's rebellion against the Myanmar junta at the Mu Aye Pu Base at the Thai-Myanmar border January 31, 2006. Karen ethnic minority groups have been fighting for autonomy from the Myanmar government in Rangoon since the end of World War Two.The KNU says a chance of peace in Myanmar is far more remote than ever as the current military regime does not want to have peaceful negotiations with ethnic insurgents. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang


A visitor gets his photo clicked with advanced Kalashnikov or AK-47 during the Defense Expo 2006, in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006. Weapons makers from around the world showcased their products at a the exhibition, where the government plans to spend tens of billions of dollars in defense purchases over the next few years. More than 300 companies from 11 countries were participating in the four-day defense exhibition, which opened Tuesday. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)


A police officer patrols at Turin's Caselle airport, Monday, Jan. 30, 2006. Italian police tightened security at Turin's Olympic venues Monday, saying preparations were going smoothly. Italy has assigned more than 9,000 officers to the Olympics, which open Feb. 10 and run through Feb. 26. The Interior Ministry said last week that some 5,500 were in place. (AP Photo/Massimo Pinca)


Bolivian soldiers hold rifles during a military parade in honour of President Evo Morales in Shinaota, near Chimore some 600 kilometres from La Paz, January 28, 2006. Morales is visiting the coca grower region. REUTERS/David Mercado


A Brazilian U.N. peacekeeper patrols the entrance of the volatile neighborhood of Citi-soleil in Port-au-Prince, Haiti January 31, 2006. Haiti's first election since the ouster of Jean-Bertrand Aristide two years ago could be the most poorly organized in the brief democratic history of the troubled Caribbean nation, some candidates say. Just a week before the February 7 election, many voters do not know where they will vote and others will have to walk miles to voting centers in a country rife with gang violence and where kidnappings have terrorized the capital, Port-au-Prince. REUTERS/Daniel Aguilar


A Brazilian U.N. peacekeeper patrols the entrance of a volatile neighborhood of Citi-soleil in Port-au-Prince, Haiti January 31, 2006. Haiti's first election since the ouster of Jean-Bertrand Aristide two years ago could be the most poorly organized in the brief democratic history of the troubled Caribbean nation, some candidates say. Just a week before the February 7 election, many voters do not know where they will vote and others will have to walk miles to voting centers in a country rife with gang violence and where kidnappings have terrorized the capital, Port-au-Prince. REUTERS/Daniel Aguilar


A Brazilian U.N. peacekeeper stands guard at the international airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti January 31, 2006. Haiti's first election since the ouster of Jean-Bertrand Aristide two years ago could be the most poorly organized in the brief democratic history of the troubled Caribbean nation, some candidates say. Just a week before the February 7 election, many voters do not know where they will vote and others will have to walk miles (kilometers) to voting centers in a country rife with gang violence and where kidnappings have terrorized the capital, Port-au-Prince. REUTERS/Daniel Aguilar


A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent stands guard on the U.S. side of a cross border tunnel leading into Mexico Monday, Jan. 30, 2006, in San Diego. U.S. and Mexican officials believe that the sophisticated tunnel that passes under the U.S.-Mexico border was used to smuggle drugs into the U.S. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy)


A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent, left, stands guard as a television cameraman returns from a tour of the cross border tunnel in the warehouse where the tunnel originates in the U.S. Monday , Jan. 30, 2006, in San Diego. U.S. and Mexican officials believe that the sophisticated tunnel that passes under the U.S.-Mexico border was used to smuggle drugs into the U.S. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy)


A pair of Santa Barbara, Ca. police department SWAT team members exit a United States Postal Service mail facility in Goleta, Calif., Tuesday morning, Jan. 31, 2006 following a fatal shooting of three employees Monday evening at the facility. The suspect was believed to be a former postal employee and all of the victims were believed to be current employees. (AP Photo/Michael A. Mariant)

Link Posted: 2/1/2006 12:00:27 AM EDT
Great Pics Again Lumpy!!!!!


Thanks
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 12:22:22 AM EDT


SMLE, 99 years and still on duty.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 12:26:53 AM EDT
thanks again lumpy always apreciated
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 1:21:54 AM EDT
Thank you.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 1:22:29 AM EDT
Thanks, Lumpy.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 1:34:51 AM EDT
Lumpy will be an EOtech owner one day. BTW, cool pics.....
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:17:34 AM EDT
FAL goodness!
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:20:53 AM EDT
Good job, Lumpy!

Plus one about the Lee Enfield; it has to be the longest serving military rifle in the world.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:25:49 AM EDT
Large contingent of M-16 rifles...
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:36:09 AM EDT
The Japs had soldiers in Iraq? Did I read that right? And what are they issued?
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:46:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 2:57:28 AM EDT by ATNT]

Originally Posted By memyselfandi:
The Japs had soldiers in Iraq? Did I read that right? And what are they issued?



Yes, they have had soldiers and airmen in Iraq for more than a year now.
The issued rifle is Type 89 (Hachijiyu Kyu Shiki), they also have customised M249s and Sig P220s.

The Japanese also took part in the gulf war BTY, though only as a very limited supportive role.


Edited to add a few photos.

Customised M249.
i30.photobucket.com/albums/c323/ATNT0314/2-39.jpg

Type 89
i30.photobucket.com/albums/c323/ATNT0314/2-35.jpg
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 5:15:15 AM EDT

I was about to go into withdrawals...just in time.

Thanks Lumpy
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 5:34:56 AM EDT
Thanks Lumpy............how you been??
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 5:38:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 5:49:30 AM EDT
good stuff, thanks!
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 5:58:57 AM EDT
Thanks again.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:05:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 6:06:14 AM EDT by mcnielsen]

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:




Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo checks her grouping from an AR15 borrowed by ARFCOMMER dpmmn. She was pleased to see that she shot a 1" group with Black Hills Match Ammo at 100 yards. "I can't wait to go get some prairie dogs!" said Arroyo.
REUTERS/Malacanang Palace Handout/Rodolfo Manabat
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:48:15 AM EDT
What's the deal with the guy in the Airborne with the gemtech? Are those being issued to Airborne guys now, or did he buy that with his own money?

And thanks Lumpy!
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:55:50 AM EDT
Awsome!!

Thanks!
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 1:44:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mcnielsen:

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/rids/20060131/i/r809851050.jpg?x=380&y=270&sig=s3nwGjKJ2LCZvETrA6wBIg--



Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo checks her grouping from an AR15 borrowed by ARFCOMMER dpmmn. She was pleased to see that she shot a 1" group with Black Hills Match Ammo at 100 yards. "I can't wait to go get some prairie dogs!" said Arroyo.
REUTERS/Malacanang Palace Handout/Rodolfo Manabat



Is that an ACOG atop a detachable carry handle?
Would that qualify as a solution looking for a problem?
Great pics as always.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 1:54:49 PM EDT



I love FALs.
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