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Posted: 1/30/2006 8:34:36 AM EDT
I recently did a photo shoot for the schools yearbook and everyone had signed releases. Now one of the dancers in the photos wants to have non of her pictures show. so she dropped $37 on my desk and walked away I've given it back multiple times and now it is sitting on my desk. Then I said I will pull the shots for some stupid amount of money to play it off as a joke when she said fine to I think it was $2700 or $3500 or something like that what should I do?
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 8:38:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PhotoKidD100:
... what should I do?



Explain it again, this time more slowly so we understand what the hell you are talking about
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 8:45:09 AM EDT
if you said you would pull her pics for $2500, then do it. total up the cost of actually doing the work, and refund her the balance.

Don't be a jerk, but don't work for free either.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 8:45:43 AM EDT
Was she nude? Why such a big deal?

And why are you putting up such a fight about it?

More details are needed
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 8:48:45 AM EDT
So...you HAVE a signed release from her? Is it notarized? If not, and the photo is going to be used for commercial purposes...your screwed.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 9:15:15 AM EDT
So I THINK you're saying:

Some girl in your high school who dances doesn't want her picture in the yearbook?

And she is giving you $37 repeatedly and you keep giving it back. For what exactly?

You told her you could remove the pics from the yearbook if she gave you $3500

Then she said Yes?

But you actually can't remove the picture?

And why does she need to sign a release if you were taking pictures of a school activity for a school yearbook?

Also isn't any action done in public allowed to be photographed and used at the photographer's discretion?


Slow down, and explain the whole story kid, you ain't making a lick of sense.

Link Posted: 1/30/2006 9:18:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By darwindog:
So I THINK you're saying:

Some girl in your high school who dances doesn't want her picture in the yearbook?

And she is giving you $37 repeatedly and you keep giving it back. For what exactly?

You told her you could remove the pics from the yearbook if she gave you $3500

Then she said Yes?

But you actually can't remove the picture?

And why does she need to sign a release if you were taking pictures of a school activity for a school yearbook?

Also isn't any action done in public allowed to be photographed and used at the photographer's discretion?


Slow down, and explain the whole story kid, you ain't making a lick of sense.



That is what I got out of it.....

Hell, we didn't even have to sign releases when I was in HS for any "random" picture used in the yearbook. Also, if you posed for the picture, then it was considered consent based on the posing itself. So, tell her she is SOL and the pics are staying in the year book.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 8:04:07 AM EDT
sorry for the rush I have a principle, editor, and yearbook kids on my ass 24/7. the photos are not for commercial use but just a HS yearbook, the problem is she is in all the photos needed for one of the main pages and the editor refuses to do a reshoot. The whole thing is being printed on Friday and I'm already backed up as it is. She has a release signed by herself, her parents, and the principle. This is why I hate working with little rich kids who think the world revolves around them. Any suggestions?
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 1:48:13 PM EDT
put those little orange target bullseye-enhancer sticky dots over her head in all the photos.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 1:50:00 PM EDT
Fuck her.
It is a School Yearbook. She has no say about it.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 1:58:35 PM EDT
For the past couple of years, my kids have brought home releases to be signed. I have the choice of photographs in a yearbook, digital pictures on a website, both, or none. I only allow yearbook pictures.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 2:01:13 PM EDT
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