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Posted: 1/24/2006 3:20:09 AM EDT
Hey, anyone a Global Studies or International Relations Major on these forums? I'm a college freshman doing my GER until I transfer to my big school (saving money) and I've got a few questions about the GS/IR majors. I've talked to Professors and Councilers but always good to hear more, un-biased opinions!
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 3:54:46 AM EDT
History, Politics and International Relations majors here.

Unbiased opinion: The world is just like a particularly nasty neighborhood. You have the thieves, the thugs, the wimps, the idealists/dogooders, the cops, and the people that are just trying to get along. Occasionally gang warfare breaks out, the cops get corrupt, the crims go straight, and whatnot. Just think of countries the same way you think of people, and that will clear up your point of view. Countries are just made up of people, right? Then why should they act any differently?

Don't buy the post-modern, constructivist BS that they try to feed you. Take what they teach you, compare it to the real world, and ask yourself "does this theory match what I observe?" If the answer is "No", then take what you can from it and chuck the rest. They will try and tell you that you can't observe the real world, because your upbringing, beliefs etc bias you, so you cant really be sure of anything. Whilst there are grains of truth to this, it is mostly BS designed to eliminate unpleasant realities that interupt good theories.

The most important thing: Do your own reading, from your own sources, as well as theirs, listen to what they have to say, THINK HARD about it all, and come to your own conclusions. Just because a person has letters after their name doesnt mean that they are smart

rant off
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 4:11:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/24/2006 4:11:55 AM EDT by ATNT]
International Relations Major and currently studying for a Masters in General management.

I mostly agree with Lert.
One point that he hasn't brought up from my experience is that a major in International Relations doesn't go much toward making one employable.

If you have any questions, I will be happy to answer them if I can.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 7:49:45 AM EDT
ChapperJoe is doing his masters in that, I think. At some school back east.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 10:40:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Lert:
The most important thing: Do your own reading, from your own sources, as well as theirs, listen to what they have to say, THINK HARD about it all, and come to your own conclusions. Just because a person has letters after their name doesnt mean that they are smart

rant off



Good advice. I don't think it will be a problem, I'm horribly opinionated and an Alaskan so that means it's pretty hard to shake me down.

ATNT: That's one thing that worries me. I'm wanting to avoid a "English" style major that will cripple my further employment. Right now, I'm wanting to master a certain culture, either being China or the Middle-East by learning their langauges, culture, etc to make me more desirable to Federal LEO jobs. How well does International Relations go to cover this? I want a really "useable" degree, that's why I'm shooting for a double-major into technical something (like Computer Engineering).

The other question I had is Graduate degree. I want to use my GI Bill (that I get from joining the Guard during/after college) to get my Graduate degree and possibly Ph.d in Political Science. I'd love to teach Political Science and/or History. For those doing Graduate work, could an International Relations or Cultural Studies degree be used to leapfrog into Graduate degree in those areas?

Thanks guys! Most helpful.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 3:33:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AlaskanMaddog:
...snip...
ATNT: That's one thing that worries me. I'm wanting to avoid a "English" style major that will cripple my further employment. Right now, I'm wanting to master a certain culture, either being China or the Middle-East by learning their langauges, culture, etc to make me more desirable to Federal LEO jobs. How well does International Relations go to cover this? I want a really "useable" degree, that's why I'm shooting for a double-major into technical something (like Computer Engineering).
...snip...



IMHO and experience, learning the language and culture is a big +.
International Relations could cover it or not, depending on the curriculum.
I was lucky and had to spent 10 months in a foreign country where I was able to learn their language.
Now I work as a translator.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 8:42:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ATNT:

Originally Posted By AlaskanMaddog:
...snip...
ATNT: That's one thing that worries me. I'm wanting to avoid a "English" style major that will cripple my further employment. Right now, I'm wanting to master a certain culture, either being China or the Middle-East by learning their langauges, culture, etc to make me more desirable to Federal LEO jobs. How well does International Relations go to cover this? I want a really "useable" degree, that's why I'm shooting for a double-major into technical something (like Computer Engineering).
...snip...



IMHO and experience, learning the language and culture is a big +.
International Relations could cover it or not, depending on the curriculum.
I was lucky and had to spent 10 months in a foreign country where I was able to learn their language.
Now I work as a translator.



Yea, that's what I'm really hoping for, is a good exchange program to spend at least a year somewhere for total immersion. Out of curiousty, what langauge did you learn?
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 12:14:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AlaskanMaddog:

Originally Posted By ATNT:

IMHO and experience, learning the language and culture is a big +.
International Relations could cover it or not, depending on the curriculum.
I was lucky and had to spent 10 months in a foreign country where I was able to learn their language.
Now I work as a translator.



Yea, that's what I'm really hoping for, is a good exchange program to spend at least a year somewhere for total immersion. Out of curiousty, what langauge did you learn?



I learnt Chinese, but I also am fluent in Japanese and Korean.
If you do an exchange program, be sure to mix with the locals, one of the people who I went with, stayed in his room surfing the internet.
Needles to say, he didn't learn much.

I don't know if it is so now, but when I did it, scholarships were comparatively easy to get for studying in a foreign country.
It might be a good idea to do some research about it.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 4:52:54 AM EDT
I would try American University in Cairo if you're interested in the middle east. My brother spent years there before he came back to the states for college. He enjoyed it.

IMO, theres NO real way to learn a language than by living among the people who speak it.

Also, I'm getting my degrees in poli sci and history. I enjoy reading and studying the past to figure out the future. It's what I'm working my thesis on. As for employability, I don't think that employers are particularly interested in what field your degree is, as long as you have one. Of course, tech fields are different, but from all of the 30 something people I know get their big $$$ management jobs with solid references and good personalities.

Something to think about.

Oh, and I plan active duty after college. I was going to go guard but decided against it. Not enough money and I didn't want to get called up in the middle of a semester.

Get as much education you can as soon as you can. Otherwise, life tends to get in the way.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 4:59:53 AM EDT
I have a degree in Poli Sci w/ concentration in IR.


I install Satellites for DISH. Good luck......
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