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Posted: 1/23/2006 2:35:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 2:41:20 PM EDT by Zippy_The_Wonderdog]
Over the past week I have noticed that the supply of hot water isn't what it used to be. Supply runs out quick when in the shower. What is a bit wierd is that it doesn't get cold...rather it just fades into a slightly too cool luke warm.

I just flushed her out on the suggestion of friends to rid it of sediments which might be fouling up the works. Any other ideas in the meantime until shower again in the morning to check it out again?

Thanks.


ETA: The water heater is almost 10 yrs. old.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:37:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 2:38:24 PM EDT by richhermes]
You more than likely have a bad element. Most heaters have two. They are easy to replace.
I hope you turned it off before flushing it.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:37:36 PM EDT
Probably time for a new one
hinking.gif
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:38:01 PM EDT
I'd bet one of the two elements is burned out or the circuit is popped.
A continuity tester should be able to tell you more. At least elements are cheap and easy to replace.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:39:37 PM EDT
Shut off the Power, Drain the tank, Replace the Elements (you will need an element wrench), fill it back up with water, put the power back on.
Cost you about 30-35 bucks.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:39:54 PM EDT
Sleep soundly. Breaker was opened.


Originally Posted By richhermes:
You more than likely have a bad element. Most heaters have two. They are easy to replace.
I hope you turned it off before flushing it.

Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:41:18 PM EDT
While you're working on it, pull back the insulation and check the status of the tank. Check for rust and if you find any, fleck it off and see it you get a leak. If you replace the HWH it would be a good time to add a catch basin underneath it and plumb it outside, assuming you don't have it in a basement with a sump pump.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:42:30 PM EDT
How old is it?

If it is 10 years or older, replace it, depending o if you have hard water.

Where I live we have very hard water, 10 years is about all you can get out of a water heater.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:43:50 PM EDT
If it is popping the overload you are bridging the elements with calcium deposits.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:46:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
Sleep soundly. Breaker was opened.


Originally Posted By richhermes:
You more than likely have a bad element. Most heaters have two. They are easy to replace.
I hope you turned it off before flushing it.




I say that because I did the same thing to a water heater on a recirculating hot water system. I turned off the heater but forgot to turn off the recirculating pump while flushing the tank. Burned out the pump. That was a $350 mistake.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:49:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:05:49 PM EDT
Ours doesn't seem as hot lately either. I thought about replacing it with one of those on-demand heaters, but they're pretty expensive. I don't know if it'd be worth it long term, because I don't know how long they last.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:21:53 PM EDT
Let's start with this question:

Gas/oil, electric, or direct fired from a boiler?
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:24:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GoGop:
Ours doesn't seem as hot lately either. I thought about replacing it with one of those on-demand heaters, but they're pretty expensive. I don't know if it'd be worth it long term, because I don't know how long they last.




Right now they can't seem to keep the things working for very long without costly repairs. You would lose your savings in repairs. I would stay away until they can iron out the design flaws. It will be the future in hot water once they get it right and the prices come down.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:25:37 PM EDT
If you haven't flushed regularly the sediment could be a silent and progressive heat killer. Stills sounds like an element problem to me.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:32:37 PM EDT
Electric


Originally Posted By ZW17:
Let's start with this question:

Gas/oil, electric, or direct fired from a boiler?

Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:36:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
Electric


Originally Posted By ZW17:
Let's start with this question:

Gas/oil, electric, or direct fired from a boiler?




Ok, do you have a electic meter with a clamp on amp probe?

Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:40:07 PM EDT
Also start reading up on "dip tubes" and how to repair them if you are serious about doing a repair and not a replacement. It's a cheap repair compared to replacement.

When you examine the top of a water heater there are two pipe connections marked "hot" and "cold". If you could see inside the tank, you should find a long tube running from the cold water connection to just above the bottom of the tank.

When hot water is used, it is drawn off the top of the tank; as cold water enters the tank to replace the hot water, it is delivered to the bottom of the tank through the dip tube. But if the dip tube drops off, which will happen, the cold water enters the tank at the top and immediately mixes with the hot water being drawn off the top.

In this case, you can start to take a shower and have plenty of hot water, but the water rapidly cools off as the cold water mixes with the hot in the top of the tank.

Link Posted: 1/23/2006 9:40:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ZW17:

Originally Posted By GoGop:
Ours doesn't seem as hot lately either. I thought about replacing it with one of those on-demand heaters, but they're pretty expensive. I don't know if it'd be worth it long term, because I don't know how long they last.




Right now they can't seem to keep the things working for very long without costly repairs. You would lose your savings in repairs. I would stay away until they can iron out the design flaws. It will be the future in hot water once they get it right and the prices come down.



Thanks ZW. I'll get a regular one to replace ours soon. We bought the house at the end of June 2005, and there's an old/crusty element on top of the water heater so it's already been changed at least once. They told us the water heater was 5 years old.
Our water is well water, and we hooked our Rainsoft water softener right after we moved in. A new water heater shouldn't get gunked up so quickly now.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 11:38:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GoGop:

Originally Posted By ZW17:

Originally Posted By GoGop:
Ours doesn't seem as hot lately either. I thought about replacing it with one of those on-demand heaters, but they're pretty expensive. I don't know if it'd be worth it long term, because I don't know how long they last.




Right now they can't seem to keep the things working for very long without costly repairs. You would lose your savings in repairs. I would stay away until they can iron out the design flaws. It will be the future in hot water once they get it right and the prices come down.



Thanks ZW. I'll get a regular one to replace ours soon. We bought the house at the end of June 2005, and there's an old/crusty element on top of the water heater so it's already been changed at least once. They told us the water heater was 5 years old.
Our water is well water, and we hooked our Rainsoft water softener right after we moved in. A new water heater shouldn't get gunked up so quickly now.



Well water can be pretty hard on hot H20 tanks, the filters and softener will help. Remember to chage out the ANODE ROD every 2-3 years and it will save both the tank and elements.

A anode rod costs maybe $10. Google it.
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