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Posted: 1/21/2006 3:54:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 7:54:48 PM EDT by niceguymr]
I used to race BMX about 25 years ago, so I like to have performance equipment and I don't mind spending a few extra bucks for it. Back then, I raced with a PK Ripper. SuperGoose, and a GT. Boy, times have changed I'm sure.

The last bike I purchased was a Schwinn MP21 about 15 years ago just for crusin around but I have no idea about what's good out there these days. I want something that will be good on the road, but can easily handle off road terrain (with a change of tires of course). I want lightweight and good components.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 7:38:46 PM EDT
bump for the night crew?
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 7:44:00 PM EDT
Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Did I say that enough times? There's lot's of good brands - Schwinn, Trek, Cannondale, Raleigh, Specialized, many, many others.

THe key is to Go to a local Bicycle shop!


Proper setup, 30 day check up, and repair/warranty support saves you money in the long run

7 years working in shops.

Link Posted: 1/21/2006 8:06:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Did I say that enough times? There's lot's of good brands - Schwinn, Trek, Cannondale, Raleigh, Specialized, many, many others.

THe key is to Go to a local Bicycle shop!


Proper setup, 30 day check up, and repair/warranty support saves you money in the long run

7 years working in shops.




Schwinn is now a Wal Mart brand

I love my '03 Specialized Enduro FSR
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 8:07:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zakk_Wylde_470:

Schwinn is now a Wal Mart brand

I love my '03 Specialized Enduro FSR




Yeah, but they also have REAL models they sell in bicycle shops too.
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 3:27:50 AM EDT
Schwinn was bought out by Huffy some years ago now. The Schinn name doesn't automatically mean quality anymore--they put that name on some very cheap junk nowadays.

--------------

I am a recumbent rider myself but they aren't real great for off-roading at all.
.......
The only upright bikes I like now are the crank-forward models that Rans makes (the left-side blue column):
www.ransbikes.com
They are a lot more comfortable to ride longer distances/periods of time than typical upright bikes are. Basically--they won't make your butt hurt the way a regular bicycle does.

The Dynamik is the "off-road" model but it isn't really built heavy enough to be pounded like a real MTB. The 2005 Dynamik was priced at $1100 at my local shop, with the regular (unsuspended) fork.

The Fusion is more of a pavement cruiser with a relaxed riding position, it's very comfortable and was priced a couple hundred or so less than the Dynamik.
~
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 4:10:03 AM EDT
Listen to fight4yourrights and find yourself a nice local shop. Tell them what your budge is and what type of riding you want to do. It's been a few years since I last worked in a shop but here's a few questions and comments that immediately come to my mind:

- What is your height and weight?
- Are you overweight?
- What type of riding? (casual, to get fit/lose weight, with your kids, for fun, to race)
- What type of off-roading to you plan on doing? (State park trails? Designated MTB trails?)
- What is your budget?
- What accessories will you need with it? (flat kit, multi-tool)
- Good lightweight components come at a price so will they fit into your budget?
- Are there several bike shops in your area?
- All bike shops will offer you some sort of service plan (usually a year free tune-ups).
- Bike shops will be able to fit a bike which will make all the difference in the world.
-Ride as many brands as possible and buy the one that fits you best. Most shops carry 3-4 top brands.

That's about all I can think of for right now and I'm sure I missed something. Get back to us after you've visited a few shops because I'm sure you'll have some more specific questions.



Link Posted: 1/22/2006 4:15:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Did I say that enough times? There's lot's of good brands - Schwinn, Trek, Cannondale, Raleigh, Specialized, many, many others.

THe key is to Go to a local Bicycle shop!


Proper setup, 30 day check up, and repair/warranty support saves you money in the long run

7 years working in shops.





+1
Purchased a Fisher MB late last year to ride to work, get a little light exercise, etc. Will do some trails (nothing serious anymore) and enjoy the riding while I still can. I bought a size larger than I measured out at. Long torso and arms and I'm heavier than ever (fat). Ride to work, ride to the gym, ride home. About 8 miles round trip. Not much for a bike ride but better than nothing.
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 5:03:05 AM EDT
I really can not stress enough how better served you will be at a local bicycle.


Experienced enthusiasts can do mail order and get what they want. NOBODY can do Walmart, Dicks, Sport Authority, etc... and get a good deal. Most of the bikes are pure trash, and the ones that aren't don't get a proper setup.


Little things like greasing the seatpost. If you don't do it, in 6 months we need to blow torch your frame so we can adjust the seat height. Loose or tight bearings wear out very rapidly. Loose crankarms get trashed. Etc.....

Bike shops can help you select something that fits your needs and budget. I always told people what they need. If they wanted to buy more, cool, but I didn't try to sell them more than they needed.
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 6:07:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By M4arc:
Listen to fight4yourrights and find yourself a nice local shop. Tell them what your budge is and what type of riding you want to do. It's been a few years since I last worked in a shop but here's a few questions and comments that immediately come to my mind:

- What is your height and weight? 6'1", 200#
- Are you overweight? no
- What type of riding? casual to all terrain
- What type of off-roading to you plan on doing? (State park trails? Designated MTB trails?) yes, yes
- What is your budget? I thought $1000 till I went to a couple of shops today. Now I'm thinking more like $1500
- What accessories will you need with it? (flat kit, multi-tool) non issues
- Good lightweight components come at a price so will they fit into your budget? I hope so
- Are there several bike shops in your area? a few
- All bike shops will offer you some sort of service plan (usually a year free tune-ups). yup
- Bike shops will be able to fit a bike which will make all the difference in the world.
-Ride as many brands as possible and buy the one that fits you best. Most shops carry 3-4 top brands.

That's about all I can think of for right now and I'm sure I missed something. Get back to us after you've visited a few shops because I'm sure you'll have some more specific questions.






Thanks. I answered some of your questions above.

Now I'm at a crossroad. After having spent considerable time researching and going to a few bike shops, I've narrowed my search down to 2 bike choices; one with rear suspension, and one without (see below). The only things is determining do I actually need a rear suspension. The main use for my bike will be riding around on paved trails and ocassional off road trails, however if I ever decide to get serious about off road, I want the bike to be built well enough to handle it.

I have some questions though... By going with a hardtail, does the rear portion of the bike (wheel and components) endure more stress, wear, and tear due to the greater amount of shock? If so, I would think that would be reason enough to go with a rear suspension model. If I get a rear suspension that can be locked down, isn't it just as good as getting a hardtail (just more money and more things that can break)? I'm really having a tough time with this decision...

Anyway, the 2 bikes that I'm considering are:

a) Specialized Stumpjumper Disc $1400 www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=12983

b) Specialized FSRxc Comp $1300 www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=12804

Also, how much below MSRP should I expect to pay from a local bike dealer? BTW, I was at a park today where I saw at least 100 mountainbikers throughout the day. I was surprised to see that well over 50% of the bikes being ridden were made by Specialized. I sat around and listened to people talking about their bikes and the people that seemed to have the most technical knowledge on bikes and the sport were riding Specialized bikes which is one reason I'm strongly leaning towards that brand. Plus, a good buddy of mine competes with a Specialized that he's had for about 10 years and it's solid as a rock.
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 6:11:33 PM EDT
Wow I was thinking of this same things recently. Is it even possible to get a decent road or hybrid bike for under $250 or do you really have to spend upwards of $1000+ to get something decent these days?
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 6:13:29 PM EDT

I like my Trek 7700.
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 6:15:16 PM EDT
I bought a bike last year, while shopping I was looking for the same thing. They told me it's either off-road or on-road, there is no bike that is great for both.

Thinking I knew better, I bought the Diamondback Wildwood. It's okay, very comfortable but it is not great for either purpose
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 6:19:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Did I say that enough times? There's lot's of good brands - Schwinn, Trek, Cannondale, Raleigh, Specialized, many, many others.

THe key is to Go to a local Bicycle shop!


Proper setup, 30 day check up, and repair/warranty support saves you money in the long run

7 years working in shops.




+1

...and if you want a bicycle for both on and off-road, consider one of these...

Felt

Link Posted: 1/22/2006 6:21:42 PM EDT
Don't you people read the monthly thread on here??? Bikes should not be allowed anywhere!!!!


I like my cyclocross bike for versatility. It's as fast and light as most road bikes but I can still ride on dirt roads.

Happy cycling.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:35:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dolanp:
Wow I was thinking of this same things recently. Is it even possible to get a decent road or hybrid bike for under $250 or do you really have to spend upwards of $1000+ to get something decent these days?


-At my area's shops, the cheapest bikes are somewhere around $300. These are quyite a bit better than what department stores sell.

But as I said--if you are uncomfortable on a regular bike, then don't go and get a new one of the same-type. Anything uncomfortable simply isn't a bargain, because you won't want to use it much.

There's a couple recumbents in the $500 range now (Sun and Cycle Genius) that are very comfortable and easy to ride, but many people don't want to make a spectacle of themselves. The Rans crank-forward bikes still look "mostly" normal but are a lot more comfortable to ride and cost up around $700-$1000 for the three lower-models (2005, last year).
~~~~~~~
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 5:00:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 5:04:44 AM EDT by fight4yourrights]

Originally Posted By dolanp:

Is it even possible to get a decent road or hybrid bike for under $250 or do you really have to spend upwards of $1000+ to get something decent these days?





You don't have to spend $1000 to get a 'good' bicycle. You do need to spend $1000 to get all the good features though.


Don't expect a $250-$350 bike to have the full suspension, disk brakes, and all the goodies.


But, a $300~ish bike is a good bike. You aren't buying junk at that level.

<­BR>
How much off MSRP? Probably nothing. Bicycles are VERY low profit items. There isn't much markup. HEck, on the cheap ones, there's barely enough to cover assembly.



Specialized has always been a good company. They were early on the scene with the Stumpjumpers. HOwever, don't think that other companies don't have equivalents. Trek, Cannondale, many other companies.

In the "real" and "good" bicycle lines, there's not a lot of variation. Most of the companies that do it right survive and do well. Since they all buy most of the components, it comes down to selection of those parts, and frame/suspension design.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 5:26:43 AM EDT
I picke 'em up at the dump.Seriously.Picked up an aluminum framed,rimmed,full suspension 28 spd something or the other a few weeks ago.Still had the little rubber tits on the tires.There were afew more with it.Later on,grabbed a bunch of kids bikes,a few looked brand new,or very little use (All the boys bikes,did have the old "skid"wear on the back tire-glad to see some things haven't changed).Used the rims/tires off the 20"-ers for pony carts.
Now is the time to find screaming deals.Lots of folks upgrade etc at Christmas.Thrift shops,Salvation Army,etc are FULL of bikes right now.Picked up a woman's 21 spd mtn bike last week for wife for $10.Again,looked brand new.All it had wrong was a bad valve stem (seat was bad-pulled one from one of the other spares,adjusted everything else,and good to go.Wife didn't like it,so it's getting OD'd and a gun scabbard .Will be my spring turkey ride.
Also,a friend picked up teh model Cannondale he wanted cheap off eBay.Just limit your search to an easy driving distance.His was 20 miles away.And he bought a sea kayak from the same guy when he went to pick up the bike.Guy had been transferred overseas and was cleaning house.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:07:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dolanp:
Wow I was thinking of this same things recently. Is it even possible to get a decent road or hybrid bike for under $250 or do you really have to spend upwards of $1000+ to get something decent these days?



Apparently so, or at least the bike stores are very good at convincing me of that. You can't really find a decent 'dual' suspension bike under $1K, unless you want to go with an unfamiliar brand with unfamilar components.

I've been around long enough to remember that when I used to race BMX (some 20 years ago), Shimano was one of the big players in components and fortunately, they're still in the game. They haven't even changed their model designations (Deore, LX, XT, etc). And to get a decent bike with these components isn't cheap, and never has been.

As far as the MSRP goes, the guy at the shop was automatically knocking off between $100 and $200 so I wasn't sure if there was a norm on what I should expect.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:14:16 AM EDT
You need SHOCKS and PEGS!

LUCKY!

Report back if you take it over any sweet jumps!
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:19:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 6:19:54 AM EDT by SHIVAN]

Originally Posted By niceguymr:
You can't really find a decent 'dual' suspension bike under $1K...



This goes back to your thread title....

NO! You do not need dual suspension.

You could do everything you probably want to do with a none suspended bike. You could probably do all you want to do with a front suspension only.

I'd be more interested in getting top level & LIGHTWEIGHT cranks, derailers, brakes, tires, rims, before I worried about a rear shock set-up.

I was a recreational rider that did some pretty hard riding on some pretty challenging trails in MD and VA. I was able to get by with a front suspension only. My riding partner was able to do everything on a "rigid" bike.

FWIW...
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:20:19 AM EDT
yes you really do need it.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:26:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:
yes you really do need it.



Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:29:01 AM EDT
I was in the same position a few months ago, only I limited myself to hardtails. I narrowed it down to the GIANT XTC, Stumpjumper, and Cannondale F600. In the end I bought the one that was the best deal. It wound up being an '05 Cannondale F1000.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:30:22 AM EDT
Back to your original question.

No, you do not need dual suspension. Dual suspension bikes were designed for fast downhill racing and became a "cool" thing to have. The more suspension you have- especially in the rear, the more it will absorb your pedaling effort. I would recomend not only getting the solid frame bike, but I would make sure that the fork has a suspension lockout which will make pedaling much easier when the suspension is not needed.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:32:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 6:33:45 AM EDT by erickktm]
Do you need it no, but it sure is nice. I ride a 01 Jamis Dakar Expert and love it, had a Cannondale super V 2000 one of the first full suspensions. I was a hutch and mongoose guy back in the day. I would take a look at Jamis they are very hard to beat price component wise and the frames have a life time warranty. I was at my local shop and they had the 05's marked down alot. You might be able to find an 05 they are lo0king to unload.

http://www.jamisbikes.com/index.html
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 8:43:04 AM EDT
I don't know for sure about these days--but in the past--cheap suspension frames aren't a good deal, because of this: the shocks that the cheaper bikes use weren't standardized. They are engineered and custom-made for that frame, by the same (wholesale Chinese) company that made the frame. And in a year or two of moderate off-roading, the shock will wear out, and you may very well not be able to get a new one, or find any other that will fit.

Many of the higher-priced ($750+) MTB's now have more-or-less standardized their shock dimensions (if you get a frame with a name-brand bicycle shock), so this isn't the problem that it used to be. Some of the higher-end ones are even rebuildable with internal parts kits but if that's not available, some of these shocks cost $150-$200 alone, some even more.

They do help somewhat for on-road riding, taking a bit of the pain out. The last "regular" bike I had was a dual-suspension MTB that I had slicks on, because I only used it for shorter-distance pavement-riding.

If you lilke doing occasional technical or hardcore off-roading, then you will need to get a MTB, , , , -but I still say for pavement or light-trail use, you will enjoy a recumbent or a Rans much more.
~
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 10:38:23 AM EDT
I’m going to try and respond to several of the issues/questions here so be patient:

First, I think the models you’re looking at are great. They are more than your budget but each will be an outstanding bike and will last you many years.

Second, Specialized is a great brand but don’t overlook the other just because you see more Specialized in your area. If you came up here you’d see 50% Trek & Gary Fishers followed by 25% Cannondale. That doesn’t mean we know what we are doing…we just have an aggressive Trek rep.

Third, if the Specialized meets your needs and budget, you like the shop and the employees; you feel confident in their abilities AND IT FITS YOU THE BEST then by all means, have at. I bought my first Specialized in 1984 and it lasted me for 7 long years.

Forth, you might not NEED a FS bike but let’s debunk a couple of opinions before we move on. Pretty much every design has progressed to the point were they can be just as efficient as a hardtail. The new Specialized Epics are freaking outstanding with the smart shock. They pedal and climb like a HT and I’ll be damned if I can tell a difference and I’ve been riding HTs for 22 years. These days they are a lot lighter but still not as light as a HT. I prefer my race bikes to be very light so HTs are what I own but my next XC bike will be an Epic or a Trek Fuel 110. They have gotten that good over the past few years. With more and more 24 Hour and endurance formats and less and less true XC races a FS bike is a wise choice.

So, you may not need one but I don’t think you’re giving up as much as you would have 4-5 years ago. If you like the FSR and it feels comfortable and fits you then go for it.

Fifth, and this is not a slam on Floppy but I’ve never understood the recumbent bikes. Even when I worked bike shops I was baffled by them. Generally it takes a very specific person to want one and those looking at “regular” bikes (as opposed to irregular bikes) would never even consider one. Hell most people have never even seen one. I understand and appreciate your passion but I don’t think niceguymr is even remotely interested.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 10:47:16 AM EDT
tag for myself

**Rode a RedLine 20" back in the day
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 10:47:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By speedball:
Don't you people read the monthly thread on here??? Bikes should not be allowed anywhere!!!!


I like my cyclocross bike for versatility. It's as fast and light as most road bikes but I can still ride on dirt roads.

Happy cycling.



No kidding. Generally I stay away from those threads because I find it ironic that gun owners (who are constantly under attack) would attack another group of people just trying to enjoy their hobby. Oh well, ignorance and intolerance runs in all circles I guess.

On one hand I have liberal friends (not so much in this area because it’s a big military town) who think people shouldn’t own guns and all gun owners are mental and potential criminals and on the other hand I have conservative friends that think bicyclist are queer, menaces and shouldn’t be allowed on the road. I’m screwed either way.

I love my cyclocross bike, a Trek X01. I use it for commuting mostly and an occasional cross race and it is my favorite bike!
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 10:54:29 AM EDT
I have 4 mountain bikes (3 hardtails, 1 full suspension) and have been riding and racing for 13 yrs, mainly the "flat" trails in TX but also some sweet stuff in Colorado and Moab. For what you are describing, I would say stick to hardtail. There is less stuff to break and wear out on a hardtail, and they usually weigh a good 3-5 pounds less than a full suspension.

Also, I would take a serious look at buying a used bike. There is no need to pay retail or even wholesale for a bike. Too many freaks are dumping last years' queen out there, and there are HUGE deals to be found on eBay or MTBR.com. There are a ton of $3000+ bikes on eBay selling for $700 or less after being ridden for 1 year. The last 2 bikes I bought off eBay were classic GT frames (LTS, Zaskar) with some decent components but I prefer to strip off the frame and build up with my own parts combos.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 11:06:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wirebrush:
Back to your original question.

No, you do not need dual suspension. Dual suspension bikes were designed for fast downhill racing and became a "cool" thing to have. The more suspension you have- especially in the rear, the more it will absorb your pedaling effort. I would recomend not only getting the solid frame bike, but I would make sure that the fork has a suspension lockout which will make pedaling much easier when the suspension is not needed.

Finally a good answer, Rear suspension especially is a waste. Front can be nice, just not cannondales, I've seen a lot of them break.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 11:15:15 AM EDT

....Fifth, and this is not a slam on Floppy but I’ve never understood the recumbent bikes....

It's easy--they are much more comfortable to ride.
Recumbent riders don't wear padded shorts or padded gloves, because they don't need them.
!
They do cost a bit more than a low-end "normal" bike--but because they don't hurt to ride, one is inclined to ride them a lot more. Like I said--all the things that riding a regular bike hurts, doesn't really happen on a recumbent.

If you like the idea of bicycle riding but don't like the pain it causes, there is Another Way.
~
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 11:54:07 AM EDT
Is the Montague brand any good?
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 11:58:55 AM EDT
OK... I think I've finally made my decision. It's amazing how much you can negotiate in price over the phone.

It looks like I'll be getting this model...

Stumpjumper FSR


Features:
-FSR technology, M4 manipulated alloy frame with Transform monocoque TT, sealed cartridge bearings, disc compatible, 120mm travel, replaceable derailleur hanger, two sets of water bottle bosses
-Fox Triad shock, custom on-the-fly three position switch 1) lock out, 2) Open, 3) ProPedal pedal assisting damping, adjustable rebound, 7.5"x1.75"
-Fox Float 120 RL fork, 120mm travel, rebound, compression adjustment, lock out, alloy steerer
-Avid BB-7, mechanical disc brakes with Roundagon rotors
-Shimano LX/XT 27-speed drive train
-Truvativ Stylo, 2-peice GXP crankset
-Mavic XM317 rims with eyelets matched to Specialized Stout/Shimano M-525 32 hole disc hubs and DT Swiss spokes
-Specialized Resolution 26x2.0" tires with aramid bead, dual compound, 120 TPI
-Specialized Body Geometry Rival saddle, hollow Cr-Mo rails

It's an entry level model for this frame, but I figure I can always upgrade the components and hardware as I see necessary. Plus, I talked him down $350 below the MSRP
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 12:02:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By niceguymr:
OK... I think I've finally made my decision. It's amazing how much you can negotiate in price over the phone.

It looks like I'll be getting this model...

Stumpjumper FSR
www.specialized.com/OA_MEDIA/2006/bikes/06SJFSR_Gry_l.jpg

Features:
-FSR technology, M4 manipulated alloy frame with Transform monocoque TT, sealed cartridge bearings, disc compatible, 120mm travel, replaceable derailleur hanger, two sets of water bottle bosses
-Fox Triad shock, custom on-the-fly three position switch 1) lock out, 2) Open, 3) ProPedal pedal assisting damping, adjustable rebound, 7.5"x1.75"
-Fox Float 120 RL fork, 120mm travel, rebound, compression adjustment, lock out, alloy steerer
-Avid BB-7, mechanical disc brakes with Roundagon rotors
-Shimano LX/XT 27-speed drive train
-Truvativ Stylo, 2-peice GXP crankset
-Mavic XM317 rims with eyelets matched to Specialized Stout/Shimano M-525 32 hole disc hubs and DT Swiss spokes
-Specialized Resolution 26x2.0" tires with aramid bead, dual compound, 120 TPI
-Specialized Body Geometry Rival saddle, hollow Cr-Mo rails

It's an entry level model for this frame, but I figure I can always upgrade the components and hardware as I see necessary. Plus, I talked him down $350 below the MSRP

You can't go wrong with the S. I had two rockhoppers back in the day and loved them.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 12:03:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By Wirebrush:
Back to your original question.

No, you do not need dual suspension. Dual suspension bikes were designed for fast downhill racing and became a "cool" thing to have. The more suspension you have- especially in the rear, the more it will absorb your pedaling effort. I would recomend not only getting the solid frame bike, but I would make sure that the fork has a suspension lockout which will make pedaling much easier when the suspension is not needed.

Finally a good answer, Rear suspension especially is a waste. Front can be nice, just not cannondales, I've seen a lot of them break.



Actually, full suspension was originally designed for XC and not for DH or FR. I can take you back all the way to the Scott, Mert Lawill or the original AMP designs to prove my point. There was no such thing as a DH or FR bike back then, only XC. Suspension itself isn’t waste but you do have to be careful in today’s market to choose a bike and a suspension design that fits you purpose.

Believe me, no one likes light, fast hardtails more than me but even I recognize that advances in FS and see the day coming when I’ll be racing one. Like I said above, especially with 24 Hour, 100 milers and various other endurance races becoming more and more common FS does have many advantages over a typical hardtail.

Go out and ride some of the new FS bikes. This spring look for a Trek Days or a Cannondale demo at a park close to you and ride some of the new bikes on some real trails and not in the shop parking lot. I suspect you’ll have a different opinion after that
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 1:00:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 1:01:33 PM EDT by gaspain]

Originally Posted By niceguymr:
OK... I think I've finally made my decision. It's amazing how much you can negotiate in price over the phone.

It looks like I'll be getting this model...

Stumpjumper FSR
www.specialized.com/OA_MEDIA/2006/bikes/06SJFSR_Gry_l.jpg

Features:
-FSR technology, M4 manipulated alloy frame with Transform monocoque TT, sealed cartridge bearings, disc compatible, 120mm travel, replaceable derailleur hanger, two sets of water bottle bosses
-Fox Triad shock, custom on-the-fly three position switch 1) lock out, 2) Open, 3) ProPedal pedal assisting damping, adjustable rebound, 7.5"x1.75"
-Fox Float 120 RL fork, 120mm travel, rebound, compression adjustment, lock out, alloy steerer
-Avid BB-7, mechanical disc brakes with Roundagon rotors
-Shimano LX/XT 27-speed drive train
-Truvativ Stylo, 2-peice GXP crankset
-Mavic XM317 rims with eyelets matched to Specialized Stout/Shimano M-525 32 hole disc hubs and DT Swiss spokes
-Specialized Resolution 26x2.0" tires with aramid bead, dual compound, 120 TPI
-Specialized Body Geometry Rival saddle, hollow Cr-Mo rails

It's an entry level model for this frame, but I figure I can always upgrade the components and hardware as I see necessary. Plus, I talked him down $350 below the MSRP



thats a good bike!

how much?

did you check it out at mtbr.com?

what model year is it?

oh, make SURE that you get the correct frame size for your body
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 1:16:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 1:19:50 PM EDT by cobra-ak]
I know I will get flamed bigtime but the day after Christmas Wallyworld had a 50% off everything sale and the Schwinn S30 bike was only $180 bucks and change, I am no mountain man but the bike hops up and down curbs, maneuvers sand grass gravel and the rest of the traps in semi urban commuter biking, the assemblers did a halfass job and I had to adjust the brakepads and tighten some bolts, and as the bike breaks in a little I will take it to a bike shop for a checkup. The s30 has front and rear springs and huge knobby tires.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:17:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 3:29:59 PM EDT by niceguymr]


thats a good bike! I hope so

how much? MSRP $2000, but I'm getting it for $1650

did you check it out at mtbr.com? Not yet

what model year is it? 2006

oh, make SURE that you get the correct frame size for your body Large for me



ETA: I just checked out MTBR.com. Cool site! Only problem is I think I'm paying too much now. It looks like the average price paid was about $1470 and I have no idea what last year's models sold for. I thought I was getting a good deal at $1650 with an MSRP of $2000. With so many reviews and people paying so much less, makes me wonder if I'm getting such a great deal.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:33:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Did I say that enough times? There's lot's of good brands - Schwinn, Trek, Cannondale, Raleigh, Specialized, many, many others.

THe key is to Go to a local Bicycle shop!


Proper setup, 30 day check up, and repair/warranty support saves you money in the long run

7 years working in shops.





Make sure you bring your wallet and some KY, cause your gonna get screwed.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:45:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 3:46:08 PM EDT by Floppy_833]
Well, have fun anyway.
And you can always repent; we'll be waiting for you on the other side.
------
I only have room to store one bike right now, so I only got one of these (cost = $1K):
www.sunbicycles.com/03/html_04/recumbents/ezspeedster_sx.html
~
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:47:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By greener556:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Did I say that enough times? There's lot's of good brands - Schwinn, Trek, Cannondale, Raleigh, Specialized, many, many others.

THe key is to Go to a local Bicycle shop!


Proper setup, 30 day check up, and repair/warranty support saves you money in the long run

7 years working in shops.





Make sure you bring your wallet and some KY, cause your gonna get screwed.



Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:48:21 PM EDT
I recently picked up a Trek Fuel 70.


Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:51:05 PM EDT
Since everyone's sharing, here's my ride. 2003 Enduro FSR.



Of course, mine is still covered in genuine circa-2005 mud
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:53:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zakk_Wylde_470:

Originally Posted By greener556:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Go to a local Bicycle shop

Did I say that enough times? There's lot's of good brands - Schwinn, Trek, Cannondale, Raleigh, Specialized, many, many others.

THe key is to Go to a local Bicycle shop!


Proper setup, 30 day check up, and repair/warranty support saves you money in the long run

7 years working in shops.





Make sure you bring your wallet and some KY, cause your gonna get screwed.



hr


It's called a business, its how they make $$$$

Look on the internet, there's plenty of magazines to check out too.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:55:09 PM EDT
Cool pics guys! Perhaps we should start a thread on bike pics, or I can just change the title.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 3:57:57 PM EDT
... To conserve energy, I often lock out my rear suspension and stiffen the front end of my Cannondale®.

... Riding her quite a bit lately, it's been hovering around 72°F here.

Link Posted: 1/23/2006 5:10:56 PM EDT
since everyone is sharing....this is my bike. Norco Drop.

Link Posted: 1/23/2006 5:15:13 PM EDT
I haven't seen any pictures yet of actual bikes that people ride??
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 6:38:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By greener556:
I haven't seen any pictures yet of actual bikes that people ride??



who really cares
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