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Posted: 1/19/2006 6:25:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/20/2006 7:34:35 AM EDT by SteyrAUG]
On this day 29 years ago in 1977.

I can remember they actually let us out of class for an amount of snow that barely did more than frost the grass. Was rather amusing to an Iowa kid like me.

http://www.intellicast.com/Almanac/Southeast/January/content.shtml

January 19, 1977 -

snowflakes were observed on the extreme southern end of the Florida Peninsula at Miami, Miami Beach, and Homestead.


The principal actually ran from class to class telling the kids to go outside and play in it.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:33:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/19/2006 6:35:06 PM EDT by LANCEMAN]
It has happened a couple of times that I can remember up here in North Florida. I remember we got about 1/2" one Christmas in the mid/late 80's. Of course most of it disappeared the minute the sun came up.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:37:41 PM EDT
I moved here from Canada that summer. 3rd grade.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:41:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/19/2006 6:42:28 PM EDT by ScrubJ]
I live about half way down the state on the east coast. My father came in from getting the paper and told me it was snowing outside. "Yeah, right dad" Rode my motorcycle to work trying to get there to tell everyone it snowed at my house. Managed to scrape enough show off the flat beds in receiving to throw a couple of snow balls.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:43:55 PM EDT
I was present during an incredibly rare occurance in Florida. During March of 1989, during my freshman year spring break, I saw a MASSIVE showing of the northern lights in a campground on sunshine key. They were visible to all the keys, and some places in Texas. Radio broadcasts were funny, as they were trying to tell the public that the everglades were not on fire, and that nuclear war had not occured, and that these are in fact the Northern Lights. This is documented kids, so don't try and call BS.

Pretty cool, you could nearly read by them. They stretched from the horizon to nearly 90 degrees above, and for almost half the sky. It was a red showing with very slow white shaft movement. It went on for nearly a half hour.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:45:26 PM EDT
4 months before I was born...
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:58:10 PM EDT
In 1987 we had snow flurries in Tampa Bay. I had a black Dodge pick-up truck and worked mids, as usual. When I got off of work, I had snow laying on the top of my truck.

I had snow flakes landing on my jacket but them melted right away.

________________________





Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:17:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:
I was present during an incredibly rare occurance in Florida. During March of 1989, during my freshman year spring break, I saw a MASSIVE showing of the northern lights in a campground on sunshine key. They were visible to all the keys, and some places in Texas. Radio broadcasts were funny, as they were trying to tell the public that the everglades were not on fire, and that nuclear war had not occured, and that these are in fact the Northern Lights. This is documented kids, so don't try and call BS.

Pretty cool, you could nearly read by them. They stretched from the horizon to nearly 90 degrees above, and for almost half the sky. It was a red showing with very slow white shaft movement. It went on for nearly a half hour.



Pretty cool, I didn't even know that was possible.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:25:38 PM EDT
Here in T-town, we had snow in, ah, '88 or '89. I remember well that we actually had enough to throw at each other. My cousin sneaked up behind me and packed my ears fulls of it. (Fucker!)

Only time I've ever seen snow in FL.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:29:23 PM EDT
I had a thick coat of ice on my car, grass, and everything else in sight, this morning. The last time it snowed here, it was 1989, and I was two.

I live in Jax, FL
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:35:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AKJonny:
I had a thick coat of ice on my car, grass, and everything else in sight, this morning. The last time it snowed here, it was 1989, and I was two.

I live in Jax, FL



I too lived in Jax, FL during that snow. Liked it so much I moved to Maine!
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:47:29 PM EDT
I have lived in Volusia County all my life. I have seen a few flurries. Seem to remember one in the early eighties.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 9:24:23 PM EDT
Actually there was couple slow flakes that fell few weeks earlier in Miami.
On December 22 or 23, 1976 (can't remember anymore) I was a kid living in North Miami and at around 6:30 PM just as my parents and I were comming out of Publix we saw couple snow flakes falling for about 5 minutes. There were several people standing around the parking lot watching it. They melted just as they touch the ground but you can definitely see them.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 1:53:30 AM EDT
That's when I saw snow in Titusville, FL. Same thing - flakes fell and melted as soon as they hit the ground.

I was playing in a band that just drove down the day before from NY state where we endured a huge blizzard - snow drifts shut down Interstate 81 in Pennsylvania so we were stuck on the highway for hours.

One night while we were playing a set at the nightclub, all of a sudden everyone in the joint ran outside. They were looking at the snow - most of them had never seen it before.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:18:22 AM EDT
I rented a little wood-frame house a couple blocks North of University in Gainesville and was BSing w a friend in the front yard that day when it started coming down. We walked over to campus and heard some kids saying , "Class was dismissed...prof sez, he came to Florida to get away from snow and they weren't abpout to teach in it...class is over." There was about an inch of snow on most of the cars we saw. I also remember a LOT of urban bikini-sunning when it finally warmed up a few months later. Stay safe
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:19:00 AM EDT
There was a pretty bad snow storm in Dallas around that time.. Dont' remember exactly, i was 7
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:20:30 AM EDT
I remember it well. 9th grade for me. The ground in Lakeland was about 50% covered and it melted by 9 am. You know, I have never experienced any real snow?

I gotta get out more.....
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:38:32 AM EDT
If you guys want snow and Northern lights, I can see if we can work out a trade for some drunk college girls in bikinis...

Link Posted: 1/20/2006 7:37:18 AM EDT
Bumped to clarify SOUTH Florida.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 7:55:05 AM EDT
I remember that day. Buddy and I took a friend to the airport to fly out.

Spent most of the day throwing snowballs at the Yankees that came down for the sun & fun
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 6:47:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:
I was present during an incredibly rare occurance in Florida. During March of 1989, during my freshman year spring break, I saw a MASSIVE showing of the northern lights in a campground on sunshine key. They were visible to all the keys, and some places in Texas. Radio broadcasts were funny, as they were trying to tell the public that the everglades were not on fire, and that nuclear war had not occured, and that these are in fact the Northern Lights. This is documented kids, so don't try and call BS.

Pretty cool, you could nearly read by them. They stretched from the horizon to nearly 90 degrees above, and for almost half the sky. It was a red showing with very slow white shaft movement. It went on for nearly a half hour.



Pretty cool, I didn't even know that was possible.



From National Geographic (couldn't find a better source on dial up).

Thousands of miles away, in Alaska, the aurora also caught the attention of Charles Deehr, a physicist at the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. “That display on March 13-14, 1989, was one of the best in the last 50 years,” he said.

I visited Deehr in March 2001 during the current phase of intense auroral activity. Deehr is a wiry man who retains, in his sixties, a youthful zest for new research ventures. His work in auroral forecasting mixes science and divination as he searches for patterns in the latest information sent from near-Earth satellites in hopes of predicting auroral activity a day or so in advance. Such forewarning makes it possible to prepare electrical systems on Earth and in space for disturbances.

Scientists use satellites to gauge an aurora’s power, but it was the 1989 aurora’s extreme reach that demonstrated to most of us how unusual it was. Most auroras are visible only in the higher latitudes (above 60 degrees), but that one showed up as far south as Key West in Florida and the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. People unnerved by the Þery tint in the sky phoned the police; others watched in awe. Within 90 seconds of the aurora’s reaching the skies above Quebec, magnetic storms associated with it caused a province-wide collapse of the power grid, leaving six million Canadians without electricity for hours.

At the same time, compass readings became unreliable, and there were reports of automatic garage doors opening and closing on their own. Radio transmissions and coastal navigation systems were disrupted, and information feeds from some satellites were temporarily lost.




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