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Posted: 1/19/2006 9:54:09 AM EDT
Steve Rushin thinks there are too many guns.

Link to SI Column

Be polite, be respectful, and let him know how you feel.

G
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 9:57:30 AM EDT
must be a member.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 9:59:01 AM EDT
Shaq needs to beat some sense into him.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 9:59:09 AM EDT
What's the point? Once everyone emails him his next piece will be how his last one brought out all the psychopathic survivalist gun-nuts and obviously proves he's right.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:05:56 AM EDT
Zak,

Some of us feel the "go along to get along" approach isn't working. We let anti-gun statements go unchallenged so long now they are accepted as normal. If we don't contest them then who will speak for us? No one.

This is how we got where we are, incrementalism and silence. We rolled back the AWB, we can roll back the rest. Get active, please.

G
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:07:08 AM EDT
Can we please see the article?

I am not a SI member.

Maybe it's illegal to post it?
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:10:16 AM EDT

We're Losing This Arms Race
Steve Rushin

As it always does in America, the New Year arrived the way the old year went out: with a bang, or the constant threat of one.
The day after Christmas former major league pitcher Jeff Reardon allegedly robbed a jewelry store in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., after passing a note to a clerk that said he had a gun. (Police never found one.)
On New Year's Eve ex-NBA center Charles Shackleford was arrested in Johnston County, N.C., and charged with carrying a concealed gun. It was his first appearance in the news since he testified in the trial of Rae Carruth, the Carolina Panther convicted of conspiring to have his pregnant girlfriend shot to death.
A few hours later former Ohio State running back Maurice Clarett allegedly robbed two people in Columbus, Ohio, after showing them a gun in his waistband.
Forty-eight hours after that, TCU freshman kicker Kasey Davis was found shot to death in his car.
Five days later recently sacked Virginia Tech quarterback Marcus Vick was charged in Suffolk, Va., after allegedly waving a gun at three hecklers.
And that's just a tiny sampling from 14 unremarkable days in the life of America, where the number of guns (200 million, by the NRA's estimate) is fast approaching the number of people (298 million). That's a fact even the most incurious person who reads nothing but the sports section will have sensed by now, as jocks and Glocks are firmly twinned in the popular culture. So commonplace is the coupling that it seems only natural that 10 members of this season's Chicago Bears held an outing -- punctuated by a violent brawl -- at an FBI shooting range. But then an informal survey two years ago by The New York Times concluded that at least 50% of NFL players own guns, which makes every team the Packers.
Would we know that Tyree Wallace died on Dec. 22 in a shootout with Philadelphia police if he hadn't been the cousin of Pistons star Rasheed Wallace? Likewise with that other tragedy, discovered the same day? James Dungy posted images of guns on his profile page at the teen website myspace.com, which was taken down after the 18-year-old son of the Indianapolis Colts' coach committed suicide. By all accounts, Dungy's website photo -- his face obscured by a bandanna -- was not reflective of his life or personality, the bandanna literally a mask of bravado. But it points out once again the seductiveness of guns to teenagers, for whom their effects are the most insidious.
A survey of Boston high school students released last year by the Harvard School of Public Health had some rather startling, shall we say, bullet points: Half of the boys responded that getting a gun would be "very or fairly easy"; nearly a third had a family member killed in a shooting, stabbing or beating; and a quarter had witnessed someone being shot in the previous year. The first homicide victim of 2006 in Boston was a Franklin, N.H., high school junior who had played on the girls' basketball and field hockey teams. She was found shot on Jan. 8.
According to a 2004 report by the Children's Defense Fund, "The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in 2001, 2,911 children and teens were killed by gunfire in the United States -- which is one child every three hours, eight children every day, more than 50 children every week." And four times as many were said to be wounded.
On a single night in suburban Dallas last October, a 17-year-old was killed and six others wounded by gunfire after a high school football game in Richardson, while three students were wounded after a football game at Duncanville High.
Last Thursday, Gary Joe Kinne -- the Canton (Texas) High football coach who was shot in the stomach last April by an angry parent -- was hired as Baylor's linebackers coach. Meanwhile, a court last week rejected former Baylor basketball player Carlton Dotson's appeal of his conviction for murdering teammate Patrick Dennehy at a makeshift shooting range in 2003. Largely unnoticed was the 16-year-old boy shot last week outside Mount Pleasant High in Delaware, after the 4:30 p.m. jayvee game.
These stories read like a reverse auction, the ages falling lower and lower. And so on Jan. 6 -- sometime between the death of Kasey Davis and the arrest of Marcus Vick -- 13-year-old Coby Cureton was found dead at home in Monroe, N.C. The "starting quarterback for the Monroe Middle School Redhawks" died of an accidental gunshot to the head, the family told The Charlotte Observer in a story that is all the more heartbreaking for its brevity. "He was a budding basketball star," the paper reported, "with aspirations to play in college and the pros."
Issue date: January 23, 2006




Here is the article.

BigDozer66
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:11:36 AM EDT
I am not going to violate copyright laws - sorry. Glance through it at the newstand, maybe? Accidentaly tear a page out... For instance page 19...

G

FWIW - I sent in a cancel notice with the reason "Steve Rushin's column on guns."
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:12:16 AM EDT
Haven't looked at, much less bought, SI in years.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:13:16 AM EDT
He's entitled to his opinion.

However, most people don't subscribe to SI for leftist political viewpoints.
Subscribers should let SI know this.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:16:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/19/2006 10:18:52 AM EDT by CRC]
Thank you

"On New Year's Eve ex-NBA center Charles Shackleford was arrested in Johnston County, N.C., and charged with carrying a concealed gun."




How do they know you are carrying a CONCEALED weapon?
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:21:21 AM EDT
Wasn't giving them any money before and I damn sure wont be now
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:22:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:
He's entitled to his opinion.

However, most people don't subscribe to SI for leftist political viewpoints.
Subscribers should let SI know this.



I like editorial staff at Popular Mechanics attitude.

Every now and then they might run an article about some firearm or firearm related technology.
Of course some anti-gun subscriber will piss and moan about it and berate them for printing a
favorable gun article. The editorial staff will pretty much tell the complainers to go shove it.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:27:33 AM EDT
Guns aren't the problem; asshat thugs posing as pro-athletes are the problem
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 10:35:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BigDozer66:

We're Losing This Arms Race
Steve Rushin

According to a 2004 report by the Children's Defense Fund, "The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in 2001, 2,911 children and teens were killed by gunfire in the United States -- which is one child every three hours, eight children every day, more than 50 children every week." And four times as many were said to be wounded.






BigDozer66



www.saferoads.org/press/press2004/pr_RoadmapRelease1-8-04.htm
Fifth paragraph down:


Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death to Americans ages 2 to 33. In 2002 alone, 6.3 million traffic crashes resulted in 42,815 deaths and 3 million injuries, representing a 12 year high. Highway crashes cost U.S. taxpayers and the economy $230 billion annually, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

It's amazing how the anti-gun crowd always claims that guns are the most dangerous items in our country.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 11:42:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jpman7:

Originally Posted By BigDozer66:

We're Losing This Arms Race
Steve Rushin

According to a 2004 report by the Children's Defense Fund, "The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in 2001, 2,911 children and teens were killed by gunfire in the United States -- which is one child every three hours, eight children every day, more than 50 children every week." And four times as many were said to be wounded.






BigDozer66



www.saferoads.org/press/press2004/pr_RoadmapRelease1-8-04.htm
Fifth paragraph down:


Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death to Americans ages 2 to 33. In 2002 alone, 6.3 million traffic crashes resulted in 42,815 deaths and 3 million injuries, representing a 12 year high. Highway crashes cost U.S. taxpayers and the economy $230 billion annually, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

It's amazing how the anti-gun crowd always claims that guns are the most dangerous items in our country.



That doesn't surprise you does it?

BigDozer66
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 11:50:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BigDozer66:

Originally Posted By jpman7:

Originally Posted By BigDozer66:

We're Losing This Arms Race
Steve Rushin

According to a 2004 report by the Children's Defense Fund, "The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in 2001, 2,911 children and teens were killed by gunfire in the United States -- which is one child every three hours, eight children every day, more than 50 children every week." And four times as many were said to be wounded.






BigDozer66



www.saferoads.org/press/press2004/pr_RoadmapRelease1-8-04.htm
Fifth paragraph down:


Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death to Americans ages 2 to 33. In 2002 alone, 6.3 million traffic crashes resulted in 42,815 deaths and 3 million injuries, representing a 12 year high. Highway crashes cost U.S. taxpayers and the economy $230 billion annually, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

It's amazing how the anti-gun crowd always claims that guns are the most dangerous items in our country.



That doesn't surprise you does it?

BigDozer66



The number is far less when you exclude "teens" = gangbangers and youth criminals. The stat is even further reduced when gun fire resulting from criminal activity (i.e., illegally possession by an adult from the "child" obtained firearm).
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 11:56:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Hank_Rearden1:

Originally Posted By BigDozer66:

Originally Posted By jpman7:

Originally Posted By BigDozer66:

We're Losing This Arms Race
Steve Rushin

According to a 2004 report by the Children's Defense Fund, "The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in 2001, 2,911 children and teens were killed by gunfire in the United States -- which is one child every three hours, eight children every day, more than 50 children every week." And four times as many were said to be wounded.






BigDozer66



www.saferoads.org/press/press2004/pr_RoadmapRelease1-8-04.htm
Fifth paragraph down:


Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death to Americans ages 2 to 33. In 2002 alone, 6.3 million traffic crashes resulted in 42,815 deaths and 3 million injuries, representing a 12 year high. Highway crashes cost U.S. taxpayers and the economy $230 billion annually, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

It's amazing how the anti-gun crowd always claims that guns are the most dangerous items in our country.



That doesn't surprise you does it?

BigDozer66



The number is far less when you exclude "teens" = gangbangers and youth criminals. The stat is even further reduced when gun fire resulting from criminal activity (i.e., illegally possession by an adult from the "child" obtained firearm).



Yes, but that would mean that the statistic they were left with is so small that even they would admit they are wrong.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 12:01:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/19/2006 12:05:01 PM EDT by NYPatriot]

Originally Posted By LoginName:
Guns aren't the problem; asshat thugs posing as pro-athletes are the problem



Very true, but do you really think that SI is going to criticize their bread & butter?

Of course not... it's much safer to demonize inanimate objects & the "evil" NRA instead.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 12:03:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jpman7:

Originally Posted By Hank_Rearden1:

Originally Posted By BigDozer66:

Originally Posted By jpman7:

Originally Posted By BigDozer66:

We're Losing This Arms Race
Steve Rushin

According to a 2004 report by the Children's Defense Fund, "The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in 2001, 2,911 children and teens were killed by gunfire in the United States -- which is one child every three hours, eight children every day, more than 50 children every week." And four times as many were said to be wounded.






BigDozer66



www.saferoads.org/press/press2004/pr_RoadmapRelease1-8-04.htm
Fifth paragraph down:


Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death to Americans ages 2 to 33. In 2002 alone, 6.3 million traffic crashes resulted in 42,815 deaths and 3 million injuries, representing a 12 year high. Highway crashes cost U.S. taxpayers and the economy $230 billion annually, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

It's amazing how the anti-gun crowd always claims that guns are the most dangerous items in our country.



That doesn't surprise you does it?

BigDozer66



The number is far less when you exclude "teens" = gangbangers and youth criminals. The stat is even further reduced when gun fire resulting from criminal activity (i.e., illegally possession by an adult from the "child" obtained firearm).



Yes, but that would mean that the statistic they were left with is so small that even they would admit they are wrong.



I concur
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 12:25:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/19/2006 12:27:23 PM EDT by PinPointOne]
Call Time inc -ask to speak with the letters to the editor manager. (212)522-1212 or (212)522-3037.

Linda Veregon is her name I believe.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 12:51:33 PM EDT
Every Miami gun show I have been to there have been some tall guys there, and before you know it there are crowds around those NBA players, they are some lucrative customers who make the gun dealers smile. Story reeks of BS
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 12:54:10 PM EDT



i love when people cite stories of scumbags doing illegal shit as a reason to ban guns.

i got an idea, how about we get rid of the scumbags...?


Link Posted: 1/19/2006 12:57:27 PM EDT
That guy needs to buy a clue. How many adults play football GAMES in this country versus how many enjoy the shooting SPORTS? His little magazine is mis-named and his viewpoint is skewed fron looking at the world from under his mommys skirts.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 1:02:07 PM EDT
How do I email him? Where is his email address on the link?
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 1:09:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CRC: Can we please see the article? I am not a SI member. Maybe it's illegal to post it?
I'm not going to sign up for a freebie article at SI if they have an anti-gun article. Shooting is a sport!
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 2:05:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AmericanPatriot1776:
How do I email him? Where is his email address on the link?



rushin@siletters.com

G
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