Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 1/17/2006 1:41:03 PM EDT
I read it about 2 years ago, and I had a day off so I sat down and re-read it today.

Who has read it, and what are your thoughts and comments? Have you employed the ideas in the book to your life, and if so, for what occassions and what were the results?

Just curious, I think it is a good read and definitely makes you think. It is the kind of book you need to read more than a couple times to digest it all, though.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:43:49 PM EDT
It's not the answer to the universe, but overall it was a good read and I was surprised just how applicable some of his principles are today.

ALSO!!!

There are HUNDREDS of different translations of "The Art of War" and many of the authors try to slant his teachings in one way or another. The only way to get around that it to read several different translations and then judge for yourself.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:44:50 PM EDT
Yes
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:46:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pale_pony:
There are HUNDREDS of different translations of "The Art of War" and many of the authors try to slant his teachings in one way or another. The only way to get around that it to read several different translations and then judge for yourself.



Most of which you can find online in plain text or html format.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:48:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:49:54 PM EDT
Definitely a book to read annually...not that I do, but in a perfect world, there would be about 10 books I would read once a year.

I also agree to look at the different translations.

It is cool because each time you read it, you are in a new place in your life (well, if you have a dynamic life....) and so it has some new meanings each time.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:50:36 PM EDT
I have a book called "Sun Tsu was a Sissy" it's about using similar concepts in the corporate world. Mainly it's for humor, but it's pretty good.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:53:28 PM EDT
The fortune cookie tome on strategy. Does contain some good stuff, but over rated, especially at the operational level.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:55:31 PM EDT
Between Sun Tzu's The Art of War and Machiavelli's The Prince, I'm all set.

BTW, links pop FREE e-texts at Project Gutenberg.

Jim
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:56:39 PM EDT

Who has read The Art of War?



Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:58:16 PM EDT
De Jomini, Machiavelli, and Sun Tzu. De Jominis was the best, IMO.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:58:37 PM EDT
Sun Tzu's "Art of War" or Machiavelli's?

Doesn't matter. Read both.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:00:42 PM EDT
Read The Art of War, and then study Chinese actions in the last 20 years.

Then write your Congresscritters to double the military.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:03:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ASUsax:
Read The Art of War, and then study Chinese actions in the last 20 years.

Then write your Congresscritters to double the military.



Mao's campaign in the Chinese revolution was much more Clausewitz than Sun Tzu. Of late, Chinese strategic planning has been much more of the Sun Tzu flavor. Sun Tzu has much more to say about policy and strategy than about operational art.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:09:34 PM EDT


I read the English translation by Yuan Shibing (sp?) who was a general for the communist Chinese army back in the 1950s. A lot of commie propaganda in that one.

My parents say that the Chinese version of the Art of War is written in very classical, complex Chinese. They said that even a native speaker would have an extremely tough time deciphering it. This is another reason why the various interpretations and translations are all over the board -- it's hard to decipher the book.

Now, does anyone remember the game Art of War for the Radio Shack/Tandy TRS80 (?) back in the 1980s?
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:11:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/17/2006 2:11:48 PM EDT by SteyrAUG]
I've read it along with The Tao Te Ching, I Ching, The Book of Five Rings, Hagakure, Budoshushin and most others.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:15:25 PM EDT
Read Sawyers version of both Sun Tsu and Sun Pin, and also have his version of the Seven Military Classics.

Of the various versions I liked Sawyers editions the best. He includes the most historical background with his translations.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:17:02 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:25:50 PM EDT
I preferred Truppenführung.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:46:25 PM EDT
Klausewitz is more on the strategic level.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:28:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:

Originally Posted By ASUsax:
Read The Art of War, and then study Chinese actions in the last 20 years.

Then write your Congresscritters to double the military.



Mao's campaign in the Chinese revolution was much more Clausewitz than Sun Tzu. Of late, Chinese strategic planning has been much more of the Sun Tzu flavor. Sun Tzu has much more to say about policy and strategy than about operational art.



Absolutely correct, insofar as the Chinese revolution and Mao's reign is concerned.

But in the 30 years since Mao's death, China has started to move in aspects that start to resemble alot of Sun Tzu's teachings - mainly about winning before the first shots are fired.

We're involved in a cold war with China. The problem is, they're the only ones that know it. If we don't wake up, they'll win the war before we even realize we're in one.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:31:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 8:17:52 PM EDT
I'm chinese; most of us read it one time or another in school. I find it very useful in the business world, especially office politics.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 9:52:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 10:01:09 PM EDT
I didn't read it, but I have it laying around so people who see it will think I'm formidable.

Top Top