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Posted: 1/16/2006 6:55:40 PM EDT
El Paso worker killed, sucked into jet engine
Jan. 16, 2006
Associated Press
www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/3590623.html
EL PASO -- An airplane mechanic was killed this morning after he was sucked into a jet's engine while passengers were boarding from the tarmac, officials said.

"A mechanic walked in front of the engine and was pulled into the engine," National Transportation Safety Board spokeswoman Lauren Peduzzi said.

She said she didn't know if any passengers saw the accident as they boarded Continental Airlines flight 1515 to Houston. A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the worker was sucked into the right engine of the 737-500.

The mechanic's identity wasn't released, but Continental identified the victim as an employee of one of Continental's suppliers. Continental released few other details about what it called a "ground incident" at El Paso International Airport.

"My fellow co-workers and I extend our heartfelt sympathies to the family and friends of the mechanic involved in this tragic event," Larry Kellner, Continental chairman and CEO, said in a statement.

There were 114 passengers and five crew members boarding the plane.

Peduzzi said there had been an earlier problem with the Number 2 engine, so the engine's metal covering was open at the time of the accident.

The NTSB was investigating.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:56:30 PM EDT
slice, dice, flambe and serve!
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:57:41 PM EDT
Bad situational awareness. As one who's worked around many a turbine, trust me, they are not easy to miss.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:58:02 PM EDT


Some of these turbines are really impressive.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:58:28 PM EDT
Now that won't leave a mark. On him, at least.


Woody
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:59:43 PM EDT
Know I know why they cancelled my flight. He should have been more courteous and not stepped in front of the engine.

Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:00:31 PM EDT
he got sucked into the FAN, not the turbine.

Still a cleanup on aisle five, though.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:00:50 PM EDT
That had to suck
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:23:06 PM EDT
You guys remember the VID of the carrier deck hand that got sucked into an A-6 on deck. He survived the flame out and everything. But I think a CFM is on a different scale then an A-6 turbine.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:25:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
You guys remember the VID of the carrier deck hand that got sucked into an A-6 on deck. He survived the flame out and everything. But I think a CFM is on a different scale then an A-6 turbine.



He was wearing a helmet, IIRC, wasn't that what saved him?
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:27:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 7:27:54 PM EDT by Roland_O_Gilead]
I can't believe no one has said it yet.

That'­ll buff out.

That'll buff out of the engine.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:28:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Merrell:

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
You guys remember the VID of the carrier deck hand that got sucked into an A-6 on deck. He survived the flame out and everything. But I think a CFM is on a different scale then an A-6 turbine.



He was wearing a helmet, IIRC, wasn't that what saved him?




actually it was some structural vanes in the inlet of the A6 that saved him. The engine just stalled out when he got lodged in the inlet.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:28:54 PM EDT
Man, sucks to be him.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:29:43 PM EDT
I think that once you make it past the Fan (or Compressor)
you go right past the combustors and then through the turbine.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:34:21 PM EDT
We supply major non-rotating structural engine components for brand G, P, and R. They share vid's of what is called the bird test. This is where they throw 2-4lb birds into the jet engine at take-off thrust to see how the fan, compression section, diffuser and turbine exhaust handle the foul....I am confident a 168lb human would make my vid's seem "not that spectacular".

On a similar note, they had an overseas vendor performing the "bird-test" and the engine failed everytime....we're talking blade-off failures. Subsequent evaluations by brand P shows they were using frozen birds
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:35:52 PM EDT
So they had a 737 on the ramp, boarding passengers from stairs (not jetway) with #2's nacelle open, engine running and throttled up enough to take the guy into the fan?



Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:39:45 PM EDT
thats gotta suck
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:46:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
slice, dice, flambe and serve!



at High Compression
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:53:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Airwolf:
So they had a 737 on the ramp, boarding passengers from stairs (not jetway) with #2's nacelle open, engine running and throttled up enough to take the guy into the fan?







+1 Very strange. It was either suicide, or somebody bumped the throttle. Unlike liberals, Jet engines don't suck that much at idle.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:59:36 PM EDT
SUCKED being him
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:04:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By OrARGB:
...
On a similar note, they had an overseas vendor performing the "bird-test" and the engine failed everytime....we're talking blade-off failures. Subsequent evaluations by brand P shows they were using frozen birds



Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:10:40 PM EDT
I guess he went to bed, like I should have, here is the question he wanted to ask


www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=428299
Originally Posted By PeteCO:
I have a question - unless you are standing directly in front of it, how far out can a turbofan suck someone in? What is a safe distance from the front? What about the sides?

Could someone sneak up from the side and stand next to the intake, or would that suck you in, too?

Crazy, thinking those fans are pushing that much air.

Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:28:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BillofRights:

Originally Posted By Airwolf:
So they had a 737 on the ramp, boarding passengers from stairs (not jetway) with #2's nacelle open, engine running and throttled up enough to take the guy into the fan?







+1 Very strange. It was either suicide, or somebody bumped the throttle. Unlike liberals, Jet engines don't suck that much at idle.




CFM-56's suck a lot of air at idle, they're running at roughly 60% N2 and 35% N1 (fan) speed. Couple that with the very close proximity to the ground has nicknamed 737-300 through 737-900's widow makers. On the -600/-700/-800 and -900's the idle suction line is all the way up twoards the L1 and R1 doors at the front of the aircraft. I look for a thrill like every other fellow, but I don't test manufacturer's suction lines.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:31:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
slice, dice, flambe and serve!




And all in about 1/100th of a second! Ron Popeil couldn't do it any better!
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:33:23 PM EDT
I've walked past running (idle) S-3 motors at about 25-30 feet, and felt not a bit of suction, so I wonder what the particulars were.

I haven't heard about this kind of thing happening too often at civi airports.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:42:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 10:48:12 PM EDT by tangeant]
Usually 25-30 ft in front is as close as you should come, to get sucked off your feet you would prob have to get fairly close 4ft or less maybe. You are ok on the sides aslong as you don't go forward of the front ring cowling. There are usually maintenance manual guidlines that show the stay away zone etc.

I would agree with the lack of situational awareness and possibly noise deprivation(Sp). With those engines you can't duck under while it is running to get to the other side since they are so low to the ground. Probably was way used to working on non running engines and step around the front to get to the other side.....Bad habits can kill .
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:57:11 AM EDT

Continental released few other details about what it called a "ground incident" at El Paso International Airport.


Ground INCIDENT? Ground mechanic is more like it.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:32:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/17/2006 2:33:17 AM EDT by sledhead907]
I work on F-16's...and speaking from experience I can tell you that intakes are unpredictable. One day a moth will be able to fly right in front of the intake, and the next day its taking everything that comes close to it. I stay the hell away from it. It's probably the one place that freaks me out. However...I have no problem getting 3 Feet away from the flame when the jet is in full AB.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:38:58 AM EDT
one of the first things you are taught when working around aircraft is to stay clear of the engine when they are running(i've worked around planes for years).....never saw anyone get sucked in, but i did see a guy get blown about 20 ft after walking right behind the engine of a 757 (he was about 2 feet from it)....he was ok, but never heard the end of it....he quit about a week later
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:43:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PROFESSORCHAOS:
one of the first things you are taught when working around aircraft is to stay clear of the engine when they are running(i've worked around planes for years).....never saw anyone get sucked in, but i did see a guy get blown about 20 ft after walking right behind the engine of a 757 (he was about 2 feet from it)....he was ok, but never heard the end of it....he quit about a week later

\


I can totally see that. It happend at an fbo I used to work at couple years ago

same day my supervisor parked a fully fueled lear 25 on an incline and unhooked to from the tug. Funny how a lear will roll down hill when not chalked Did thousands in damage to the nose of the aircraft. I think it buffed out of the tug though
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 4:51:44 AM EDT
Ban jet engines !!!


It's for the mechanics....
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:04:02 AM EDT
This thread is useless with out pics....





efxguy
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:05:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By OrARGB:
We supply major non-rotating structural engine components for brand G, P, and R. They share vid's of what is called the bird test. This is where they throw 2-4lb birds into the jet engine at take-off thrust to see how the fan, compression section, diffuser and turbine exhaust handle the foul....I am confident a 168lb human would make my vid's seem "not that spectacular".

On a similar note, they had an overseas vendor performing the "bird-test" and the engine failed everytime....we're talking blade-off failures. Subsequent evaluations by brand P shows they were using frozen birds



That is why I hate sitting near the engine on an aircraft.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:11:24 AM EDT
PICS!
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:22:50 AM EDT
Mythbusters debunked the "frozen birds" myth.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:23:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Belfry_Express:

Originally Posted By Merrell:

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
You guys remember the VID of the carrier deck hand that got sucked into an A-6 on deck. He survived the flame out and everything. But I think a CFM is on a different scale then an A-6 turbine.



He was wearing a helmet, IIRC, wasn't that what saved him?




actually it was some structural vanes in the inlet of the A6 that saved him. The engine just stalled out when he got lodged in the inlet.



it was the thick protective clothing he had, he got wedged in there. His helmet destroyed most of the engine internals causing it shut down as it was sucked through.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 6:47:34 AM EDT
From what I've heard on the grapevine:

The guy was a contractor working on an oil leak. He ran the engine at %70 at the gate with passengers onboard. A HUGE no-no.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 6:50:32 AM EDT
OUCH
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 7:42:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ARChoo:
From what I've heard on the grapevine:

The guy was a contractor working on an oil leak. He ran the engine at %70 at the gate with passengers onboard. A HUGE no-no.



I’m an A&P mechanic and heard this as well yesterday at work. I guess the guy was “on call” maintenance for a few airlines.

If what is being said here is true he should not have been doing high power runs at the gate, with pax boarding in process especially with air stairs and not a jet way. I’ve seen passengers boarding and suddenly jump out of line and dash over towards the aircraft to try and snap a picture. A passenger could have just as easily gotten sucked into that engine.

Some of our rules are:

* No high power runs at the gate. There are designated areas we taxi to for high power engine runs.

* If "idle only" engine runs are performed at the gate, ramp control is radioed and permission is requested.

* A fire guard is posted at the front of the aircraft as well as a person at the rear of the aircraft to stop traffic from driving through the jet blast.

* No engine runs performed while passengers are boarding adjacent aircraft. This is simply to prevent passengers from being exposed to high noise levels.

*If it is foreseen that maintenance will take longer than planned, the passengers are pulled from the plane and sent back to the gate, or sent to board our spare aircraft if one is available.

It’s sad what happened to this guy but it proves that you have to be aware of your surroundings at all times. It’s easy to get distracted in such a situation. You’ve got tremendous pressure on you from all sides to get that aircraft up and out on time. This guy was hopefully working under the guidance of Continentals Maintenance Control, so he probably had pressure from them, the flight crew, the gate agents and maybe even his own bosses.

Working for an airline we are lucky to have Human Factors training that can help prevent such accidents, I know from experience that smaller companies don’t view this type of training as valuable.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 7:57:53 AM EDT

According to what I heard, the mech was indeed looking for an oil leak. Couldn't find it at idle power so the engine was brought up to 70% N1. Apparently he was working around the engine and was NOT wearing a safety harness that was required for the work. Got sucked in. According to a guy on another board who saw the scene about 10 min after it happened, there was a red streak behind the engine that extended back about an airplane's length...

Not pretty.. contract mech had been an a&p for 25 years.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 8:04:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
You guys remember the VID of the carrier deck hand that got sucked into an A-6 on deck. He survived the flame out and everything. But I think a CFM is on a different scale then an A-6 turbine.



On an A6 Intruder there is a stationary ( aka non spinning ) airframe attachment that prevented his upper body torso ( was too large ) to fit through and make contact with the rotating fan blades. Had it been any other aircraft than an A6 most likely he also would have been killed / mince meat.

I was in attack squadron 86 USN on the carrier Nimitz CVN-68 and worked for Boeing here in Seattle on the flightline for a year or so. Get sucked into a jet engines fan blades and 99.9% of the time you are cashing in your chips.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 8:06:55 AM EDT
Who gets to clean that out? Is the engine going to have to go thru a complete teardown and rebuild or do they just grap a hose? What about metallic objects on him such as keys, wrenches etc?
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 8:53:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Johninaustin:
Who gets to clean that out? Is the engine going to have to go thru a complete teardown and rebuild or do they just grap a hose? What about metallic objects on him such as keys, wrenches etc?



I would guess that engine is history. An object as small as a screw sucked up off the ramp can cause tremendous amounts of damage upwards of hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage. A habit of aviation personnel is to always be on the look out for FOD (Foreign Object Damage) on the ramp and to pick it up.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 9:01:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Patriot328: According to what I heard, the mech was indeed looking for an oil leak. Couldn't find it at idle power so the engine was brought up to 70% N1. Apparently he was working around the engine and was NOT wearing a safety harness that was required for the work. Got sucked in. According to a guy on another board who saw the scene about 10 min after it happened, there was a red streak behind the engine that extended back about an airplane's length... Not pretty.. contract mech had been an a&p for 25 years.
Damn, he must've been running late for a real hot date to take risks like that, or maybe he was late for kick-off.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 9:23:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Patriot328:
According to a guy on another board who saw the scene about 10 min after it happened,



Link?
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 11:36:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By burbanite:

Originally Posted By Patriot328:
According to a guy on another board who saw the scene about 10 min after it happened,



Link?




forums.flightinfo.com/showthread.php?t=70621

That's the link the guy claiming to see the aftermath.

The info about not wearing a harness came from inside source, but I'm sure it's on the net, too.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 11:48:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Patriot328:

Originally Posted By burbanite:

Originally Posted By Patriot328:
According to a guy on another board who saw the scene about 10 min after it happened,



Link?




forums.flightinfo.com/showthread.php?t=70621

That's the link the guy claiming to see the aftermath.

The info about not wearing a harness came from inside source, but I'm sure it's on the net, too.



links to pics are there on page 2

Yuck

WBK
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 12:03:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Mythbusters debunked the "frozen birds" myth.



Actually, they revisited it and confirmed it. Frozen birds out of their chicken gun showed big time penetration of their test media, when compared to the thawed bird.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 12:08:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Patriot328:
[
That's the link the guy claiming to see the aftermath.




Thanks Patriot, just goes to show you can't let your guard down.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 12:32:42 PM EDT
I am also an A&P:

"One of the lineman who drove us to lunch was telling us that he'd been standing about 15 feet from the guy when he got sucked in. He said it appears that the guys hat blew off, and when he went to reach for it he got caught in the suction of the intake and in the blink of an eye he disappeared. Said he probably never knew what hit him. He said the engine then made a series of loud explosions and then shut down. He said there was very little remains left of the victim, and what was left had been shot all the way out across the ramp and out to the adjoining taxiway. He said it was a very gruesome sight.

What I gathered about the unfortunate gentleman was that he was in his early 60's, had four children, and didn't work for Continental, but worked for a mechanic shop next to the FBO. All the employees of the FBO knew him well and were visibly shaken up and upset over the ordeal. The terrible part is that he had only been over there helping because he didn't have any work to do that morning, so he thought he'd go over and lend them a hand - something he'd do from time to time."

forums.flightinfo.com/showthread.php?s=00c2c2b7f725abcb877465f83967df56&t=70621&page=2
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 12:33:50 PM EDT
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