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Posted: 1/15/2006 5:12:20 PM EDT
Just curious 'cause I have a whole can full of pre-65 silver coins and I can't seem to recall why these are so special. Care to enlighten me?

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:21:52 PM EDT
Is this a trick question...

THEY ARE SILVER

Post 64 are not.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:23:05 PM EDT
They're.......silver.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:24:10 PM EDT
90% silver.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:25:18 PM EDT
don't let these guys fool you. They are absolutely worthless as they are old currency.

The best thing to do with them is to send them to me for propper disposal.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:29:35 PM EDT
What is the silver content in 'buffalo' nickles?
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:30:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JHill:
What is the silver content in 'buffalo' nickles?



there is none
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:30:39 PM EDT
Full reply:

Frior to 1965 quarters and dimes were minted from pure silver. After that, they were made of a sandwich of copper and silver since they were now worth less than the silver that the old coins were made from. Since that time, I think they have removed all silver and now the "silver" part is a copper-nickel alloy.

The reason for having them is two-fold: first, they are worth more as a collectors item, and second, in the even of economic collapse, they will still be worth something since they are actually made of a metal with some value. Also will be worth probably significantly more than current face value.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:30:48 PM EDT
1. They're siliver, and have a value of at least the silver content.
2. They're US currency, and have a value of at least that indicated by the coin.

So you get to pick and choose which value you want.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:31:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chicken_little:

Originally Posted By JHill:
What is the silver content in 'buffalo' nickles?



there is none



I'm assuming they are probably made of nickel. Imagine that.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:41:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fadedsun:
Just curious 'cause I have a whole can full of pre-65 silver coins and I can't seem to recall why these are so special. Care to enlighten me?




Obviously a victim of government schooling...
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:49:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PromptCritical:
Full reply:

Frior to 1965 quarters and dimes were minted from pure silver. After that, they were made of a sandwich of copper and silver since they were now worth less than the silver that the old coins were made from. Since that time, I think they have removed all silver and now the "silver" part is a copper-nickel alloy.

The reason for having them is two-fold: first, they are worth more as a collectors item, and second, in the even of economic collapse, they will still be worth something since they are actually made of a metal with some value. Also will be worth probably significantly more than current face value.



I take it Nickels are made of..just..nickel? No silver? I've got a ton of those too.



Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:56:34 PM EDT
I've got 65 pounds of pre 65 quarters and dimes

Hey I've got to brag about something, my great great aunt was a smart lady!
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:01:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SOCOM-16:

Originally Posted By fadedsun:
Just curious 'cause I have a whole can full of pre-65 silver coins and I can't seem to recall why these are so special. Care to enlighten me?




Obviously a victim of government schooling...





GR
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:23:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By greenranger:

Originally Posted By SOCOM-16:

Originally Posted By fadedsun:
Just curious 'cause I have a whole can full of pre-65 silver coins and I can't seem to recall why these are so special. Care to enlighten me?




Obviously a victim of government schooling...





GR



STFU. I was homeschooled boys!

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:26:46 PM EDT
a silver quarter is worth about .75, no big deal...
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:30:57 PM EDT
war nickles have silver in them, i forgot exact years like 40-44. They are easy to tell tell the diffrence. look it up your damn self
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:32:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 6:33:28 PM EDT by hanau]
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:39:57 PM EDT
I've got a bunch of nickels in the 40-44 range. Also have a 1oz silver coin that I was given at my graduation....

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 7:21:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JFP:
a silver quarter is worth about .75, no big deal...



You are incorrect. Most places are paying 5x face for pre64 silver. I am not guessing, I know. I just sold about $300 of pre64 silver to buy a few gold coins. I got 5.5x face and had a handful of collectible ones in the bunch. All in all it was a couple thousand in silver.
CH
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 7:23:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Maggot:
war nickles have silver in them, i forgot exact years like 40-44. They are easy to tell tell the diffrence. look it up your damn self



42-45.

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 8:08:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:03:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fadedsun:

Originally Posted By PromptCritical:
Full reply:

Frior to 1965 quarters and dimes were minted from pure silver. After that, they were made of a sandwich of copper and silver since they were now worth less than the silver that the old coins were made from. Since that time, I think they have removed all silver and now the "silver" part is a copper-nickel alloy.

The reason for having them is two-fold: first, they are worth more as a collectors item, and second, in the even of economic collapse, they will still be worth something since they are actually made of a metal with some value. Also will be worth probably significantly more than current face value.



I take it Nickels are made of..just..nickel? No silver? I've got a ton of those too.






No

If I remember right except for WWII nickels Buffalo and Jefferson nickels are 75% copper 25% nickel.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:51:45 PM EDT
Mark and Jeff had some pre-'65 coins in "Lights Out" that they used as money after the nuclear explosion.

It might be a good thing to have on hand just in case. . .
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 1:10:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 1:10:59 AM EDT by Sukebe]

Originally Posted By TomHighway:
Mark and Jeff had some pre-'65 coins in "Lights Out" that they used as money after the nuclear explosion.

It might be a good thing to have on hand just in case. . .



Why would "precious" metals have any value in the event of a nuclear holocaust? What use would they be? How does a pocket full of silver improve ones chances of survival more so than a can of beans, some clean water or a loaded gun?
I mean, consumable goods would have genuine value in their uses as opposed to precious metals or stones. Which would be useless.

Under those circumstances, a barter systems makes much more sense than currency.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 2:52:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Sukebe:

Originally Posted By TomHighway:
Mark and Jeff had some pre-'65 coins in "Lights Out" that they used as money after the nuclear explosion.

It might be a good thing to have on hand just in case. . .



Why would "precious" metals have any value in the event of a nuclear holocaust? What use would they be? How does a pocket full of silver improve ones chances of survival more so than a can of beans, some clean water or a loaded gun?
I mean, consumable goods would have genuine value in their uses as opposed to precious metals or stones. Which would be useless.

Under those circumstances, a barter systems makes much more sense than currency.



if TSHTF, ammo will be more useful as currency than silver.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:09:55 AM EDT
You are allowed to mount bayonet on a pre-65 coin. Just ask any former SEAL at gunshows.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 8:10:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By spartacus2002:

Originally Posted By Sukebe:

Originally Posted By TomHighway:
Mark and Jeff had some pre-'65 coins in "Lights Out" that they used as money after the nuclear explosion.

It might be a good thing to have on hand just in case. . .



Why would "precious" metals have any value in the event of a nuclear holocaust? What use would they be? How does a pocket full of silver improve ones chances of survival more so than a can of beans, some clean water or a loaded gun?
I mean, consumable goods would have genuine value in their uses as opposed to precious metals or stones. Which would be useless.

Under those circumstances, a barter systems makes much more sense than currency.



if TSHTF, ammo will be more useful as currency than silver.



In "Lights Out", vendors were willing to take the silver coins as money since the value was contained in the coins themselves, not backed up by the faith and credit of the US Government.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 8:21:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PromptCritical:

Originally Posted By chicken_little:

Originally Posted By JHill:
What is the silver content in 'buffalo' nickles?



there is none



I'm assuming they are probably made of nickel. Imagine that.



They are made from buffalo chips...
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