Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 1/15/2006 1:18:28 PM EDT
His job will take him to Angola for a week. I know nothing of that place. Please fill me on the safety of Americans there.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:22:41 PM EDT
Check the State Department....

travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1096.html



SAFETY AND SECURITY: The security situation in Angola has improved markedly since the end of the civil war; however, Americans should still exercise caution. Although the war has ended, ground travel throughout Angola is problematic due to banditry and land mines, which were used extensively during the war. Frequent checkpoints and poor infrastructure contribute to unsafe travel on roads outside of the city of Luanda. Police and military officials are sometimes undisciplined, and their authority should not be challenged. Travel in many parts of Luanda is relatively safe by day, but car doors should be locked, windows rolled up, and packages stored out of sight. Visitors should avoid discretionary travel after dark, and no travel should be undertaken on roads outside of cities after nightfall.

The civil war between the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) and the Government of Angola has ended. The insurgency pursued by the Front for the Liberation of the Enclave of Cabinda (FLEC) has virtually ended although the Government of Angola continues to pursue the remnants of FLEC forces. In the past, FLEC has threatened foreign nationals with kidnapping. Throughout Angola, taking photographs of sites and installations perceived as being of military or security interest, including government buildings, may result in arrest or fines and should be avoided.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department's Internet web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement, Travel Warnings and Public Announcements can be found.

Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except on U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME: Crime is a serious problem throughout the country. While most violent crime occurs between Angolans, foreigners have occasionally been attacked as well. Street crime is a regular occurrence in Luanda. The most common crimes are pick-pocketing, purse-snatching, vehicle theft, and vehicle break-ins. Armed muggings, robberies, and carjackings involving foreigners are not frequent but do occur. Police and military officials are sometimes undisciplined and their authority should not be challenged. In general, movement around Luanda is safer by day than by night. Air travelers arriving in Luanda at night are strongly advised to arrange reliable and secure ground transportation in advance. If this is not possible, use only the regulated taxi service at the airport and in Luanda; unregulated taxis are unsafe and can present a crime risk.

Motorists should stop at all police checkpoints if so directed. Police officers have been known to participate in shakedowns, muggings, and carjackings.

There have been police operations against illegal aliens and private companies resulting in deportation of foreign nationals and loss of personal and company property. Independent entrepreneurs in Angola should carry all relevant immigration and business documents at all times.

Travelers should be alert to scams occasionally perpetrated by Luanda airport personnel. Immigration and customs officials sometimes detain foreigners without cause, demanding gratuities before allowing them to enter or depart Angola. Airport health officials sometimes threaten arriving passengers with "vaccinations" with unsterilized instruments if gratuities are not paid. Searches of travelers' checked baggage is common; travelers are advised to take precautions against this possibility. Travelers should also be sure to have checked luggage receipts ready to display upon exiting the airport.

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:23:34 PM EDT
Thanks
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:31:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:32:36 PM EDT
I can't remember the exact site, but there is a government site that has all the current foreign relations, current country statuses, and also american safety. Do a search on google.

I was offered a job there about 2 yrs. ago, but I found out that I would be under constant guard with a milita group, so needless to say I declined. I don't need somebody else to pull the trigger for me. I feel safer doin it myself. That way there isn't any confusion or no hostage situations where I will be ransomed off.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:38:30 PM EDT

Any country in sub-saharan Africa can completely melt down in a surprisingly short time.



For general advice, tell him:

- to expect to pay bribes
- to not drive himself (insist on a driver)
- to not get into an arguments with officials/police/military/etc.

In countries like Angola, life has very little value. It is important to be careful and prudent. Listen to the local Americans/Brits/Germans who work there, and follow their advice.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:41:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 1:46:02 PM EDT by BillSouthCarolina]
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:43:43 PM EDT
Oil industry?
I know a guy who worked there in Angola for Schlumberger. He said it's a hole.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 2:37:36 PM EDT
Do not have unprotected sex or share needles there.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 3:28:54 PM EDT
Angola is where they cornered the market on Ebola, AIDS, and other nasty diseases.

Why would he want to go there? You couldn't pay me enough to go to Angola.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 3:31:45 PM EDT
The prison farm in Louisiana or the African nation?
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 3:35:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TomF32:
The prison farm in Louisiana or the African nation?




Same thing either way.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 3:45:14 PM EDT
About as safe as unprotected sex with Courtney Love
Safe as a sleepover at the Neverland Ranch
Safe as a gerbil in the Gere household
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 4:01:29 PM EDT
prolly be safer in louisiana
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 4:02:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 4:06:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
Any country in sub-saharan Africa can completely melt down in a surprisingly short time.



For general advice, tell him:

- to expect to pay bribes
- to not drive himself (insist on a driver)
- to not get into an arguments with officials/police/military/etc.

In countries like Angola, life has very little value. It is important to be careful and prudent. Listen to the local Americans/Brits/Germans who work there, and follow their advice.



huge +1 here, DK prof speaks the truth... heed his words, all of them!
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 4:11:28 PM EDT
Um, tell me one area of africa that is safe.
That whole continent is a third world crap hole.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 4:12:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 4:15:03 PM EDT by Win_88]
Slavery
Rebels
Canibals
What law?


If you need to go to a hospital and need blood.. Better off saying no. Condoms wont help either. That is a liberal Urban Myth that they work.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 4:27:13 PM EDT
Ohh, I thought you meant the prison down here.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:20:49 AM EDT
Don't carry anything valuable that would mark you as a wealthy person either. ie, leave that watch, good clothes, and expensive camera behind.



Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:23:07 AM EDT
Try to get him to make sure his personal affairs are in order: will, policies, etc. It is a very bad place.

I hope he is up on his shots...every stinking last one of them.
Top Top