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Posted: 1/15/2006 11:22:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 12:06:46 PM EDT by Grivo_Mak]
My son has a nebulizer compressor and since he doesn't need it anymore I'm wondering if I can use it as an airbrush compressor to spray Norrells on my upper.

There's no documentation so I don't know how many psi it puts out but it seems real strong.

Anyone ever heard of doing this?


Edited to add:

I found this data: 35 psi nominal 11 lpm miminal


Is this enough to airbrush with?
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:24:56 AM EDT
I'm pretty sure it wont put out enough pressure, but its worth a try
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:36:01 AM EDT
Dude dont do that make a wicked bong out of it!
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:40:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 11:41:36 AM EDT by Grivo_Mak]
Perhaps I should just put some Everclear or Vodka in the nebulizer bowl and huff away.


I know this thing has to have a good quality compressor in it but I can't figure out how powerful it is.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 12:31:52 PM EDT
35psi is ok depending on the thickness of the paint mix.
I used to airbrush scale model a/c and used enamel and lacquer paints.
I didn't a use very high psi for them.
I think you will have more trouble finding an airtitght and proper size
coupling for the hose.
You will need a regulator as well.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 12:41:15 PM EDT
You should be just fine with that. The viscosity of your liquid is the important factor. Use Teflon tape on all of the connections to reduce air loss.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 12:44:23 PM EDT
You will need a dryer, too, if you live in a humid area.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 12:52:43 PM EDT
35psi is plenty, especially if you are using gravity feed. You may have to experiment with the viscosity of the paint.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 12:57:34 PM EDT
Airbrush or paint sprayer?

Airbrushes are the little metallic pen-size things with a jar of paint around the midsection that artists use. Paint sprayers are the big metallic pistol-size things with a rather largeish tank attached closer to the front like you see in auto painting shops.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:31:28 PM EDT
35 and 11 are enough for an airbrush, wheither or not it can supply nthe necessary volume is another question. If you could hook up a small tank that maybe able to trap enough volume to get one upper done at a time after you took the time to build up the volume. Might be much better off to get the airbrush set at Harbor Freight. The brush looks like a copy of a Binks Wren and those are/were pretty good little airbrushes.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:22:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PaDanby:
35 and 11 are enough for an airbrush, wheither or not it can supply nthe necessary volume is another question. If you could hook up a small tank that maybe able to trap enough volume to get one upper done at a time after you took the time to build up the volume. Might be much better off to get the airbrush set at Harbor Freight. The brush looks like a copy of a Binks Wren and those are/were pretty good little airbrushes.




The Wrens were alright, but I've always hated external mix brushes.

I have a Badger 200, an Olympos HP-18 and a Paasche VL.
The VL is a double action brush.
They've never given me problems.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:28:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ARDunstan:

Originally Posted By PaDanby:
35 and 11 are enough for an airbrush, wheither or not it can supply nthe necessary volume is another question. If you could hook up a small tank that maybe able to trap enough volume to get one upper done at a time after you took the time to build up the volume. Might be much better off to get the airbrush set at Harbor Freight. The brush looks like a copy of a Binks Wren and those are/were pretty good little airbrushes.




The Wrens were alright, but I've always hated external mix brushes.

I have a Badger 200, an Olympos HP-18 and a Paasche VL.
The VL is a double action brush.
They've never given me problems.





Yeah, but a Paasche VL is maybe a TAD bit much for spraying an AR


I'd say an external mix is more than fine for what he wants to do, AND it's just plain simpler for a beginner who wont have the 'feel' for a double-action brush.


A 40-50 dollar Badger 350 setup from a hobby store will go a LONG way for stuff like this, and be easy enough for a novice to use & clean.


I mean, it aint freehand photo retouching


Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:35:02 PM EDT
Not meaning to hijack, but can you put Norrels on stocks etc...?

I know you have to bake it, so would that melt platic parts?
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 12:20:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:
Not meaning to hijack, but can you put Norrels on stocks etc...?

I know you have to bake it, so would that melt platic parts?




Not 100% sure, but I THINK it needs to bake at something like 150° F ? That's not hot enough to melt MOST firearms type "plastics" usually.


Of course, I'd watch the thing like a friggen hawk, just to be sure ! Also being ON plastic, the solvents in the paint itself will have a little 'bite' and adhere to it better to begin with, as long as it's completely degreased, for most plastics, other than maybe Nylon, Teflon, and Polyethylene.

I dont think it'd be much of a problem, but I'd sure as hell be VERY careful.

Link Posted: 1/16/2006 12:36:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JB69:

Originally Posted By ARDunstan:

Originally Posted By PaDanby:
35 and 11 are enough for an airbrush, wheither or not it can supply nthe necessary volume is another question. If you could hook up a small tank that maybe able to trap enough volume to get one upper done at a time after you took the time to build up the volume. Might be much better off to get the airbrush set at Harbor Freight. The brush looks like a copy of a Binks Wren and those are/were pretty good little airbrushes.




The Wrens were alright, but I've always hated external mix brushes.

I have a Badger 200, an Olympos HP-18 and a Paasche VL.
The VL is a double action brush.
They've never given me problems.





Yeah, but a Paasche VL is maybe a TAD bit much for spraying an AR


I'd say an external mix is more than fine for what he wants to do, AND it's just plain simpler for a beginner who wont have the 'feel' for a double-action brush.


A 40-50 dollar Badger 350 setup from a hobby store will go a LONG way for stuff like this, and be easy enough for a novice to use & clean.


I mean, it aint freehand photo retouching






Very true.
An external mix brush, and a good air supply and some practice is all he needs.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:48:32 AM EDT
Norrell's is baked at 300*F for 1 hr on metal parts, 250*F for 1 1/2 hrs on plastic parts. This has proven to not harm the plastics used in most firearms.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:51:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
Norrell's is baked at 300*F for 1 hr on metal parts, 250*F for 1 1/2 hrs on plastic parts. This has proven to not harm the plastics used in most firearms.



Thanks, I ordered some, because I want to try and paint my AR's. Now I need to get an airbrush. I was thinking of a Badger.
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