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Posted: 1/15/2006 8:41:10 AM EDT
I've been hearing about it for years, as I'm pretty interested in old ways of doing things. Finally going to make the pilgrimage tomorrow.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 8:44:30 AM EDT
I went to college 100 yards from it (just freshman year). Its pretty cool, but not a really good place for a college student. Go on one of their ghost tours (if they still do that). Check out the maze at the governor's mansion.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 8:45:40 AM EDT
Enjoy your trip down here to Virginia. Haven't been there since a field trip on 5th grade so I don't recall much though the old capital was pretty cool.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 8:46:04 AM EDT
It's not bad if you're into to the old way of doing things. You might also want to check out Hancock Shaker Village in the Bershires.

Bomber
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 8:46:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rodent:
I've been hearing about it for years, as I'm pretty interested in old ways of doing things. Finally going to make the pilgrimage tomorrow.

last summer. It's pretty cool. Plus, theres an old fashioned gunsmith with old timey guns for old timey gun pron and an old timey armory. And sometimes the british invade.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:05:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thebomber:
It's not bad if you're into to the old way of doing things.



I shaved with a straight razor this morning. I'm heating and cooking with a wood stove as I write this - dinner will be venison that I shot and an heirloom variety squash from my garden. I lived for a year recently without electricity or plumbing (I still don't have a TV). I'm just finishing a post-and-beam house.


You might also want to check out Hancock Shaker Village in the Bershires.


I went to the Shaker village near here when it still had Shakers. I've been to Upper Canada Village, Greenfield Village in Michigan, and Sturbridge Village and Plymoth Plantation in Mass. I love that kind of stuff, but I often notice that a lot of the re-enactors don't really know what they're doing. I think the perfect job for me would be as an "overseer" at such a place. I picture myself on my horse, making the rounds, showing my faithful underlings the proper way to split wood, dress a deer, whip slaves, shoot Indians, etc.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:07:10 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:08:07 AM EDT


Been there twice. The old gunsmith shop is pretty cool.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:09:35 AM EDT
Go to the gunshop and the museum and the Governor's Mansion. The first will demonstrates the old fashion way of making firelocks. The second has a great display of old guns. The latter will overwhelm you with Brown Besses. They're wall to wall at the Governor's Mansion. Of course, the Armory is also worth visiting.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:13:14 AM EDT
Check out William and Mary Campus real quick. The old and ancient sections of campus are beautiful.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:18:23 AM EDT
I spent about a week in the area and went though the whole Colonial thing about ten times and it was really cool. It can give a whole new appreciation of what our Forefathers went through. There is a lot of the tourist-trap trinkets for sale, but check out the smith shops, the jail, the church, the armory - do it all. It really is cool. If you're a Mason, check out the Lodge.

I found the annual pass to be worth it, rather than buying a one-day pass every day I went there. YMMV
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:49:18 AM EDT
A wonderful place you could spend days there and not see it all.

Again don’t miss the gunsmith's shop they still build the old flintlock rifles.

There are also peripheral exhibits out of the main area you should not miss. Also visit Jamestown and the Yorktown battlefield. Lots of other things to do in the area.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 10:01:24 AM EDT
It's great. Second the recc on the gunsmith and also suggest the armory/octagonal little fort, whatever it is called.

It is a humid swamp in summer, though!
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 10:12:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rodent:
I've been hearing about it for years, as I'm pretty interested in old ways of doing things. Finally going to make the pilgrimage tomorrow.


yes, was there the week prior to 9-11
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 10:35:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rodent:
I've been hearing about it for years, as I'm pretty interested in old ways of doing things. Finally going to make the pilgrimage tomorrow.


Next time you're in Michigan, check out the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in Dearborn. Lots of amazing stuff, especially (to me) their collection of steam engines.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:38:58 AM EDT
If you have a little extra time this place may be of interest.It's located 2.5 hrs west of Williamsburg at the junction of I-64 and I-81.

Frontier Culture Museum
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:46:12 AM EDT
If you're coming all that way, you should see Jamestown and Yorktown also. There have been a lot of interesting discoveries at Jamestown lately, but you have to see both the original site where the excavations are ongoing and the reconstructed version which is a seperate facility.

Yorktown was where the British surrendered and the pivot point on which modern history turned, IMHO. It has less to see (battleground, historic houses, visitor's center) but is connected to both Williamsburg and Jamestown by the beautiful Colonial Parkway.

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:46:35 AM EDT
I visited there in 1984. It was very interesting.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:46:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tripytrucker:
If you have a little extra time this place may be of interest.It's located 2.5 hrs west of Williamsburg at the junction of I-64 and I-81.

Frontier Culture Museum



Hell you could spend a 2 weeks taking in all the historical sites along that route. And when you get there you are at the start of the Blue Ridge Parkway and end of Skyland drive.

That part of VA and North is just packed full of stuff to do from Presidents homes to Civil War battlefields and much more.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:55:32 AM EDT
Make sure you have a new pair of gym shoes cause they are going to get a workout walking around colonial williamsburb, make sure you check out the budweiser clydsdale horses.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:03:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 1:09:35 PM EDT by LWilde]
IT IS FANTASTIC! Colonial Williamsburg

My missus and I have had annual passes for years. We usually visit 3-5 times a year to see the place in each season. I purchase the tickets to buy the annual passes at the AAA. Saves me about $5.00 per. Strange...we were just talking about going again today.

The food and drink, while actually very realistic colonial fare, are really some of the best we've ever had. You can look up the menus online above. If you are driving down for the day, I recommend arriving NLT 1100. Purchase your passes, get on the bus just outside the main building. This bus takes you to another bus which will take you into the town. I recommend you get off at the first or second stop nearest the Capital. Take the tour. The re-anactors will provide great info on how important our early ancestors were in helping to creat our great Republic. They show you how justice was meted out as well...and that is a real eye opener.

Then go across the field to the gunsmith and see them create some of the finest ancient rifles I have EVER seen. For a mere $20k, you too can have master craftsmen make you the most beautiful flintlock you have ever laid eyes on. I was most impressed with the georgeous furniture of the rifles.

Then just start walking down Duke of Gloucester Street headed to The College of William and Mary about a mile down the road. On your way, you will pass all sorts of shops, tavverns and exhibits. Everything from delicious period ginger cookies to fantastic silver and pewter and period clothing for Miz Rodent are available for the right price.

The Governour's Mansion is near the end of the street. DO NOT miss it.

My favourite place to visit is the Bruton Parish Church. It is the oldest constantly worshiping congregation in America, dating from 1715. The names on the pews read like a Who's Who among our forefathers....Great Virginians who once worshiped there include George and Martha Washington, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Richard Henry Lee, Patrick Henry, et al. The church is beautiful and the docents will provide a great history of the church.

I love American History so I really enjoy listening to the re-enactors. If you are willing, you can even interact with them. One year I had a great conversation with Mrs. Washington. Another year, while I was on active duty, I got into it with the captain of the ship which had recently arrived in the port of Norfolk with tea, silks and broadcloth, fruit from the Caribbean and assorted dry goods. He intended to leave on the morrow with the tide, with his return cargo of indigo, tobacco and cotton for Plymouth.

Anyway, when I happen to mention that I too was a naval officer, the captain inquired as to, "...which navy might that be Sir?", to which I replied, "Why Sir, the United States Navy." Said he, "Well since this is 1765, I know not of any United States Navy!."

My courteous but firm reply was simply, "Rest assured, you shall Sir...you shall."

Go to the site, enjoy the town and the food.

Oh...and I REALLY recommend you order a "Rummer" for lunch...but ONLY one. You will NOT be disappointed.

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:06:20 PM EDT
Great advice, thank you. I shall toast your health with a Rummer.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:13:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Rodent:
Great advice, thank you. I shall toast your health with a Rummer.



You are most welcome. About four years ago, I purchased a Williamsburg recipe book in one of the big stores in the reception center. In it was the Rummer. I really like them...but be careful...they pack a wallop!

I also recommend trying whatever appetizer mixed plate the server recommends. They change them occasionally and they never fail to please one and all.

Some of the food has strange names...like the Salamagundi salad...but they are all quite good.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 2:51:11 PM EDT
There's another gun collection in the DeWitt Wallace gallery that's intersting.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 4:57:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Rodent:

I think the perfect job for me would be as an "overseer" at such a place. I picture myself on my horse, making the rounds, showing my faithful underlings the proper way to split wood, dress a deer, whip slaves, shoot Indians, etc.



Tucker makes a saddle for that job, although a custom rig would be more fitting that esteemed and exalted position. I would suggest accompaniment by a young lass riding side saddle, singing Marble Halls.

You should also make the short trip to Jamestown while there, and if you have an extra day, the Mariner's Museum in Newport News, if you are interested in boats.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:01:28 PM EDT
Might as well visit Yorktown where Cornwallis surrendered his army to Washington & Rochambeau. Since you're near Richmond, you should see the Virginia Historical Society (Battle Abbey) & the Museum of the Confederacy.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:43:18 PM EDT
Are you really going to be in Williamsburg tomorrow? My girlfriend and I are heading up there also if you want to meet up for lunch or something.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:18:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fiend:
Are you really going to be in Williamsburg tomorrow? My girlfriend and I are heading up there also if you want to meet up for lunch or something.



IM sent.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:20:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Rodent:
I've been hearing about it for years, as I'm pretty interested in old ways of doing things. Finally going to make the pilgrimage tomorrow.




Dont just do the quick run through on the tours. Spend a significant amount of time in each shop and ask questions. ITS A COMPLETE BLAST
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:22:49 PM EDT
My wife and I go there alot or use to. Take your bikes best way to get around.

I have never been able to see the drum and fife play walking around the streets like you see in their add. Do they really do that.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 8:59:59 PM EDT
Have dinner at one of the taverns.

Back in the late 90's, my boss and I were driving from DC down to Norfolk on business and he had never been there. So I suggested that we go there for dinner. Got to the Visitor Center and made reservations for the King's Arms. Drove up and parked and walked around at twilight for an hour until dinner. Most people walking aroundwere employees walking home. And afte dinner we ran across the Lanthorne Tour. Made points that night, he knew where he was taking his wife on their next vacation.

Back in 1965 when I first visited a pistol from the gunsmith started at $150 and a rifle at $300.

The Mariners Museum down the road at Newport News has the remnants of the Monitor being cleaned up and on display along with a lot of other neat things.

As if there aren't enough places on the Peninsula and surrounding are to keep a history nut busy for weeks
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:06:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BRONZ:
My wife and I go there alot or use to. Take your bikes best way to get around.

I have never been able to see the drum and fife play walking around the streets like you see in their add. Do they really do that.



Yes they do. It is VERY stirring.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:16:54 PM EDT
I was there last year. It was good. They have a couple of taverns there that are worth checking out at night - on the main street there - they have good stuff on tap, and they have musicians there in colonial garb - real 18th century type set up, I guess. I enjoyed the hell out of it...
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 5:31:46 PM EDT
I just moved to DC area and have Williamsburg on my " to do " list. Hope you enjoy the trip and would be interested in your feedback on historic Williamsburg.
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