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Posted: 1/14/2006 1:04:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/14/2006 1:10:25 PM EDT by beagler76]
I purchased a 160 G external hard drive to back up my PC, but it didn't come with any "backup" software. I have been cutting and pasting files and I'm getting tired of it. Surely there's an easier way, right?
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:07:18 PM EDT
Another hard drive and ghost or something similar
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:08:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:
Another hard drive and ghost or something similar



+1

Another hard drive.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:10:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Max_Mike:

Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:
Another hard drive and ghost or something similar



+1

Another hard drive.



My original post wasn't clear. The 160 Gig IS the other hard drive (external, for backup) I just don't know the best way to get files onto it.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:13:22 PM EDT
Purchase a Promise or Adaptec RAID 1 card and mirror your two drives. Won't help you if if accidently delete files, but it will guard against catastrophic HD failure.

Depending on your machine, your existing motherboard may even support RAID 1
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:14:12 PM EDT
I use a 2nd HDD. And yes, drag and drop what I want to save. I dont use a copy program as im always adding files, and is easier for me to just cop that folder over to the 2nd HDD. And periodically I do a DVD (or 5) backup.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:14:23 PM EDT
I would still Gohst it or at the very least put all files and folder in 1 general folder and just copt it over. It takes longer to do full back ups each time but just do it and walk away. Google free backup software is another option.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:17:12 PM EDT
Forgot to add:

If you're looking for a more traditional backup mechanism you're better off with commercial backup software. Ghost/V2i/Drive Image are all great products, but you'll be wiping and restoring an entire partitiion if you're just looking to recover a couple of files.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:18:40 PM EDT
start-> programs -> accessories -> system tools -> backup
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:23:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By falaholic1:
start-> programs -> accessories -> system tools -> backup



and what exactly does this do?

(I also have an external HD -200G)

My first effort copied them alright, but in barely recognizable folders)
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:29:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By redfisher:

Originally Posted By falaholic1:
start-> programs -> accessories -> system tools -> backup



and what exactly does this do?

(I also have an external HD -200G)

My first effort copied them alright, but in barely recognizable folders)



It allows you to backup and restore data mang
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:31:22 PM EDT
I use winrar. Its not exactly fast, but its good if you can figure out how to use it. even works for incremental backups

-foxxz
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:33:36 PM EDT
Just lasso, drag and drop all the files or folders you want to copy from C to whatever drive letter of the external hard drive, and walk away. Let it chug a while.

Why are you copy and pasting?
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:34:05 PM EDT
Thanks fal.

My system goes Start, programs, accessories, tools, and then an option that lists "Files and Transfer Settings Wizard" - or similar)

Will this copy them identically, or erase my originals?

(It says in the dialog it is for switching to a new computer)

TIA

Me - computers
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:49:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By redfisher:
Thanks fal.

My system goes Start, programs, accessories, tools, and then an option that lists "Files and Transfer Settings Wizard" - or similar)

Will this copy them identically, or erase my originals?

(It says in the dialog it is for switching to a new computer)

TIA

Me - computers



Files and Transfer Settings Wizard" is NOT what you want!

If Backup is not listed then you may need to install it from your Windows install media as not all OEM system loads still install it by default.

Other 3rd party warez will work better - M$ has not put any effort into Backup in a long time.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:59:02 PM EDT
I use Streamload's online upload/download service. I pay $10/month and I can upload and download files to my heart's content.

Might give it a try...I love it.

HH
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 6:05:38 PM EDT
Get Norton Ghost. You can set it up to back up everything and then do it automatically every night to ONLY backup the new files or files that have changed. It keeps your backup current to the day.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 6:08:00 PM EDT
a external harddrive is still a harddrive. just as likely to fail as the hd in your computer.

<­BR>the best way to backup your data is on cd-r or dvd-+r. then put it in a sleeve to protect it from being scratched
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 6:20:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/14/2006 6:24:35 PM EDT by mm34b]
A second internal hard drive and Retrospect 7.0 backup software to duplicate the main drive. External drives tend to fail more often than internal ones due to less cooling ability and getting bumped around.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 9:20:33 PM EDT
make a windows xp bootable cd on it and put Ghost on it, works for me
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 9:22:54 PM EDT
mirrored RAID array
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 9:28:59 PM EDT
I tried to back up my hard drive, but I couldn't find reverse.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 10:24:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thelastgunslinger:
mirrored RAID array



That'll save data by preventing the drive from being corrupted since there's some redundancy built into RAID drives by design. I prefer a Ghost backup instead. If you get a virus or accidently erase some files or muck up your registry or whatever, you can just do a restore and bingo you're back to where you were since the last drive image anyway. I do a backup of my home PC once a month and keep the last two backup images
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 10:25:51 PM EDT
Assuming you have a recent version of Windows, you want to use the included Backup program, colloquially referred to as NTBackup. Read the help file so you understand the different backup types. You probably want to do a full backup, then periodically do incremental backups. The former takes a long time, the latter shouldn't take as long, but it depends on how much stuff you have. If you have enough space, you probably want to back up 'everything.'

Try to avoid relying on simple copies, or programs that weren't meant for doing real backups. Reliable backups generally require special handling of various sorts, and NTBackup has this handling. It also has the ability to generate reliable backups live, something other methods probably will lack.

I disagree with the suggestions to go RAID. RAID is nice for enhancing performance, and maintain high availibility for servers, but it is not a substitute for backups. It will not help you when your filesystem is corrupted, or when a program screws up and corrupts your files, or you delete them yourself--which accounts for most lost files.

I'm also not sure that any special third-party backup programs or other filesystem utilities are necessary unless you have special circumstances. Definitely avoid using some program for backup unless it was made specifically for backup.

Personally, I have half a terrabyte of RAID 10 that I backup incrementally across the LAN to another computer with a largish disk. I'm hoping to establish a system of backing up periodically to DVD-R's soon, as well. (Interestingly, quality home-burnt DVD-R's supposedly last much longer than factory-stamped DVD's.)
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 10:28:58 PM EDT
My hard drive makes that "BEEP...BEEP...BEEP" sound like a dump truck when I try to back it up.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 8:58:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mm34b:
External drives tend to fail more often than internal ones due to less cooling ability and getting bumped around.



That might be true, if you assume that your external drive will be running all the time. However, if it's only powered up during backups, it could last a lot longer than your internal drive.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:18:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Skibane:

Originally Posted By mm34b:
External drives tend to fail more often than internal ones due to less cooling ability and getting bumped around.



That might be true, if you assume that your external drive will be running all the time. However, if it's only powered up during backups, it could last a lot longer than your internal drive.



I use a 4200 RPM low power laptop hard drive. It is able to run off the USB port, doesn't get warm at all, is quiet, and should hold up better to shock. I get about 30MB/s performance out of it. Works well enough for me.

-Foxxz
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:28:15 AM EDT
Here's what I do:
I use V2i Protector. It allows me to take an image of the machine while Windows is up. The installation CD is even bootable. It does everything I (or you) need it to for backup purposes. All the bases are covered:

1. Disaster recovery is easy, since you have an image.
2. Incremental backups are possible, and can be rotated.
3. Individual files can be restored.
4. In my case, backups are stored on a server & RAID-1 array, which provides more than enough redundancy enough for my needs.
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