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Posted: 1/13/2006 10:53:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2006 10:54:16 AM EDT by mjohn3006]
Can someone draw up the lesson for the '.
I am looking for personal name possesive(sp)

Alices little girl.
Alices' little girl.
Alice's little girl. Pretty sure this is wrong as it would be "Alice is" right?

This is to mean the little girl belongs to Alice. Which one is right?


Thanks
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 10:55:53 AM EDT
#3 is correct.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 10:57:32 AM EDT
Actually the one you think is wrong is the correct one.

Alice's little girl. Correct.

Alices is the plural of Alice.
Alices' would be the possessive if the woman's (<----) name is Alices instead of Alice.

Link Posted: 1/13/2006 10:58:13 AM EDT
#2 could be correct if multipule Alices have a little girl.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 10:58:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Then why is "it's" equal to "it is", but "Alice's" is not equal to "Alice is"?
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 10:59:46 AM EDT
Neither one of the three is correct. It is a present participle definitive possessive antonym. It"s a trick question?
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 10:59:56 AM EDT
don't be confused by the fact that the possessive of an "it" is "its" (no apostrophe) and the contraction of "it is" is "it's". Every other case I can think of, though, is the exact opposite.

Come on, American English grammar is so simple.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:01:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By efpeter:
Neither one of the three is correct. It is a present participle definitive possessive antonym. It"s a trick question?



I think you mean "None of the three are correct."
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:01:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Then why is "it's" equal to "it is", but "Alice's" is not equal to "Alice is"?



Actually Alice's would also be correct for "Alice is". It just wouldn't sound as fluid to say

"Alice's going to the store"

instead of

"Alice is going to the store"


Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:02:12 AM EDT
My head hurts.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:03:25 AM EDT
Something that confuses people is when the name ends in s, then the apostrophe goes after the s, my last name is Owens, the possessive is Owens'.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:03:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2006 11:07:40 AM EDT by NimmerMehr]

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Yup and if the personal pronoun ends in an 's' you don't need a trailing s.

Ex: "Chris' little girl."

Edit: In Latin I think it would be 'Alicae little girl."
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:03:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FMJshooter:
My head hurts.



Take two trips to the range and call me in the morning.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:08:28 AM EDT
There is a neat little book I had for English 101 and 102 called "Rules for Writers" IF I could find it, I could post about the correct way for punctuating stuff. But since I can't find it, I won't.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:08:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Yup and if the personal pronoun ends in an 's' you don't need a trailing s.

Ex: "Chris' little girl."

Edit: In Latin I think it would be 'Alicae little girl."



But that does not count for Alice, even though it ends in an S sound, there is no S. right?
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:09:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Then why is "it's" equal to "it is", but "Alice's" is not equal to "Alice is"?



Jeebus.

The apostrophe in that case shows possession or ownership. The two words, "it" and "is" is conmbined and abbreviated by the apostrophe. Thus "it's", where the apostrophe replaces the "i" in the word "is" - again, denoting possession, ownership or quality, etc. For example: "I have a Ford car. It's blue in color." or "It's a sad day when adults sleep during remedial English class."

I think I'm right. Or I could be drunk.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:10:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By vsound:

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Then why is "it's" equal to "it is", but "Alice's" is not equal to "Alice is"?



Actually Alice's would also be correct for "Alice is". It just wouldn't sound as fluid to say

"Alice's going to the store"

instead of

"Alice is going to the store"






Wrong.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:11:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By vsound:

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Then why is "it's" equal to "it is", but "Alice's" is not equal to "Alice is"?



Actually Alice's would also be correct for "Alice is". It just wouldn't sound as fluid to say

"Alice's going to the store"

instead of

"Alice is going to the store"






Wrong.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:12:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2006 11:16:16 AM EDT by Greenhorn]
"Alices" could either mean more than one Alice, or I guess it could be a name, though I've never heard it.

"Alices' " would only work if something belonged to multiple Alices or belonged to someone named "Alices"

"Alice's" concievably could be used as a contraction of "Alice is," but it usually isn't. It would usually be in reference to something that belongs to Alice.

However, with a word such as "your" or "its," it is possessive without the apostrophe. With one, it would be a contraction of "you are" or "it is" (of course if it were a contraction of "you are" it would be you're, not you'r.)

If you're talking about grammar nazis or CDs, you do not use an apostrophe, even though everyone does, unless you are using it as a possessive. Plurals do NOT use an apostrphe, unless it is a combination of a plural and possessive, in which case the apostrophe comes AFTER the plural "S" and is NOT followed by another "S."
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:19:31 AM EDT
Tagg'ed.

Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:20:21 AM EDT
Where does the ' go?

I like to keep my ' safely stored away. I have a really special ' and I don't want anything bad to happen to it.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:23:35 AM EDT
Apart from the posessive, the " ' " is a place holder for omitted words in a contraction. My favorite? The future second person plural of Texas, "Ya'll'll". "Ya'll'll regret that." I hope I spelled that right.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:37:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2006 11:43:44 AM EDT by NimmerMehr]

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Yup and if the personal pronoun ends in an 's' you don't need a trailing s.

Ex: "Chris' little girl."

Edit: In Latin I think it would be 'Alicae little girl."



But that does not count for Alice, even though it ends in an S sound, there is no S. right?



Umm... err.....yessss

Because the written word and the spoken word differ in English. Like the word 'herb' is pronounced 'erb'.
(I say 'herb' anyway becuase there is a fucking H at the front. )

Alice may end with an S sound when spoken because of it's soft C and silent E, but it is still written 'Alice' and therefore gets the "'s" at the end.

Edit: By a soft C/hard C I mean 'cement' and 'change'. Try pronouncing the C in Alice the same way you pronounce the C in Change. I'd say Al-ick-ah.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:40:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By effinNewGuy:

Originally Posted By vsound:

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Then why is "it's" equal to "it is", but "Alice's" is not equal to "Alice is"?



Actually Alice's would also be correct for "Alice is". It just wouldn't sound as fluid to say

"Alice's going to the store"

instead of

"Alice is going to the store"






Wrong.



Nope. "Alice's going to the store" is a correct usage of the apostrophe. See the following link:

Apostrophe s
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:44:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2006 11:45:41 AM EDT by cheaptrickfan]
The mis-use of the apostrophe is rampant. Any of you all ever remember the advertising for the movie "Bridget Jones's Diary"???

Notice the mis-use of the apostrophe? It should read "Jones' Diary" not "Jones's Diary".

Since hollyweird can't get their shit together, what makes anybody think our kids are gonna understand English??
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:46:42 AM EDT
in a single syllable word that ends with an 's' has to have the apostrophe after the 's'. for example chris' diner...therefore #3 is correct for case
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:47:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2006 11:50:14 AM EDT by NimmerMehr]

Originally Posted By cheaptrickfan:
The mis-use of the apostrophe is rampant. Did anybody ever see the advertising for the movie "Bridged Jones's Diary"???

Notice the mis-use of the apostrophe? It should read "Jones' Diary" not "Jones's Diary".

Since hollyweird can't get their shit together, what makes anybody think our kids are gonna understand English??



Actually, I think both are considered acceptable, but one is favored out of tradition. (the Jones' Diary is the favored one)

also, why are there about 150 verbs in english that don't end in ED?

slap slaped

punch punched

strike struck - he striked me.

hit hit - he hited me.

purchase purchased

buy bought - he buyed me a new AR lower.

Oh well, it is better than German. At least english has vowels and verbs.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 11:56:48 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 12:08:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 12:28:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 12:34:39 PM EDT
All You All need to make this thread a sticky!!!
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 2:04:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vsound:

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
#3 is correct.



Then why is "it's" equal to "it is", but "Alice's" is not equal to "Alice is"?



Actually Alice's would also be correct for "Alice is". It just wouldn't sound as fluid to say

"Alice's going to the store"

instead of

"Alice is going to the store"





"it is" can be abbreviated to "it's" or even with a pro-noun like "I am" and "I'm"

But it can't be done with a name

Link Posted: 1/13/2006 2:13:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2006 2:15:15 PM EDT by Manic_Moran]
Because the written word and the spoken word differ in English. Like the word 'herb' is pronounced 'erb'.

There are two schools of thought on that one. I think it's a regional thing, in a similar manner to the way the pronounciation of 'garage' or 'tomato' differs.

Similarly, I seem to recall that when expressing ownership by a person whose name ends with 's', it is permissable also to put a "'s" at the end of it, such as "Chris's widget". Two ways of skinning that particular cat, which is rather odd in English.

ETA, I see that has been pointed out above. Might be another regional issue.

NTM
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 4:41:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
Can someone draw up the lesson for the '.
I am looking for personal name possesive(sp)

Alices little girl.
Alices' little girl.
Alice's little girl. Pretty sure this is wrong as it would be "Alice is" right?

This is to mean the little girl belongs to Alice. Which one is right?


Thanks




Most people here are not professional enough to use the apostrophe.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 4:46:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cheaptrickfan:
All You All need to make this thread a sticky!!!


Wouldn't that be All Y'all?

and I'm from Illinois.

Y'all is singular. All Y'all is plural.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 12:26:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Holland_Gunworks:

Originally Posted By Schulze:
Apart from the posessive, the " ' " is a place holder for omitted words in a contraction. My favorite? The future second person plural of Texas, "Ya'll'll". "Ya'll'll regret that." I hope I spelled that right.



Actually the correct contraction is Y'all...

You are correct that the apostrophe is a place holder for omitted letters, and y'all is a contraction for "you all" so the apostrophe goes after the y.

- HGW



Oh yeah, that was a dumb mistake. I knew y'all'd catch that.
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