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Posted: 1/12/2006 4:40:02 PM EDT
I used to get thier catalogues and read all the hype, but are they really that good?

FWIW I'm looking for new kitchen knives and saw a lot of Cold Steel stuff at a gun show.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 4:41:15 PM EDT
I'm not sure. The cold steel knife I had was a POS
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 4:44:46 PM EDT
Their marketing is better than their product. It's not bad, just not worth the price. Service sucks.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 4:50:45 PM EDT
I have a Peacekeeper II dagger. It is OK, but not near the quality of my SOGs.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:11:20 PM EDT
Cold Steel is worth the hype.

I have a lot of Cold Steel knives. They are as well built or ever better than Benchmades.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:19:05 PM EDT
I have had a few...seemed to be fairly well made.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:25:44 PM EDT
Lynn Thompson is better at marketing than he is at designing a knife. There is a reason why Cold Steel is not active on any knife forums. Out of the box the knifes are sharp but a pain to keep that way and the serations(unless they have changed in the last year or two) have a tendency to chip and cannot be redone.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:27:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By UZI4you:
Cold Steel is worth the hype.

I have a lot of Cold Steel knives. They are as well built or ever better than Benchmades.





Cold Steel = Cheap Steel

The AUS-6A / 8A they use doesn't hold a candle to the Benchmade 154CM. IMHO, Benchmade is one of the best VALUE's in a good knife.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:30:26 PM EDT
some are pretty good--others just suck

i have a SRK thats been pretty good; some smaller (chicom) ones that were not
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:43:48 PM EDT
I have one of the K5 kitchen knives and it wasn't impressive enough to make me want a whole set. I used it for a few years before the handle started to break up. I've still got the knife, but I don't use it as often as the others. For kitchen knives, I'd recommend a set of real kitchen knives.

On the other hand, I've had the same Voyager I've been carrying daily for probably close to 10 years and have been very happy. I usually take advantage of their sales and get stuff pretty cheap. I haven't tried a Benchmade knife, but I can't believe it's so much better as to justify 3 times the price.

I'm curious as to the specific complaints people have with Cold Steel knives. I've been very satisfied with all of mine.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:48:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By UZI4you:
Cold Steel is worth the hype.

I have a lot of Cold Steel knives. They are as well built or ever better than Benchmades.



This hadji bitchslap is for your blaspheming...
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:50:35 PM EDT
We use American Chefs by Chicago Cutlery in the kitchen. Older then heck and every one of them still is in good shape after tons of use. I was not all that impressed by the Cold steel ones I saw at shows. Seemed chineesy and not worth the money. I have buck knives built as well for a whole lot cheaper.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:53:10 PM EDT
Mine are all still alive.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:02:22 PM EDT
Thye have started cutting prices on some of their knives and using cheaper steel. For example, some models that used to have blades made of AUS-8 are now made of 420.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:05:59 PM EDT
Some Cold Steel knives are a pretty good bargain, but others are junk. I do like their fixed blades like the SRK or Recon Tanto, and especially their older larger fixed blades, like the Recon Scout. As a knifemaker, Cold Steel doesn't exist-they are purely a marketing company, with other companies making the knives they sell. I believe it's Camillus that has for a long time produced their fixed blades, and those Carbon V blades keep a very sharp edge.

I have a 4" Gunsite Folder that serves as my "weekend around the house and yardwork knife," which is large enough for all day carry for those type of chores, and if I actually trash it, I'm not out a lot of dough. So far, it's been a real champ. As has been mentioned, the AUS6 steel they use is rather inferior, and most certainly to 154CM. I've never for a moment thought the Cold Steel knives were better than Benchmade, but to each his own.

And yes, Lynn Thompson is quite the blowhard. Ask yourself, if a company that sells as many knives as Cold Steel does, yet has no forum anywhere on the major internet knife forums, is that just a coincidence? Probably not.

If you look around the EE, you'll almost always find someone selling a Cold Steel knife of some sort, so if you do your due diligence, you may be able to pick up a pretty fair knife (depending on the model) at a real good price.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:06:37 PM EDT
I would look into kershaw. Their Ken Onion line has some really good knives in it. As far as Cold Steel goes I would pass. Their rep is not the greatest.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:07:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By qwijibo:
I'm curious as to the specific complaints people have with Cold Steel knives. I've been very satisfied with all of mine.



Rolled edges, chipped edges, edges that won't stay sharp....all things that make me hate a cheap knife.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:41:37 AM EDT
What about their swords?

I was considering picking one up. Either the Chisa (my first pick) or the Katana.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:42:57 AM EDT
$65 for my Cold Steel SRK.
Don't recall much "hype", but compare that to the $400 knives and all of the true "hype" they have to use to sell those things.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:44:13 AM EDT
All mine have been worth it. Their San Mai steel tantos are bad ass.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:48:10 AM EDT
Depends on the knife.

The old Recon 1 knives made out of UAS 8A steel are good knives. The newest ones made out of cheaper softer steel suck.

Their Carbon V knives are pretty good as a rule. I have one of their Trailmaster II bowies, and it is one hell of a knife.

Their Voyager series knives are pretty good too. Tough and they hold an edge pretty well thanks to their UAS 8A steel.

Some of the Cold Steel knives are bargains. Some are crap.

And the comment about the serrations are true. The Cold Steel serration pattern is sharp as hell....but almost impossible to sharpen once they are dull.

I have always had more success from plain edged knives for every day use, as they are easier to sharpen.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:52:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:
Their marketing is better than their product. It's not bad, just not worth the price. Service sucks.



Yep.
I was disapointed with the rifleman's tomahawk i purchased.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:57:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 9:01:55 AM EDT by Ring]

Originally Posted By pathfinder74:
What about their swords?

I was considering picking one up. Either the Chisa (my first pick) or the Katana.



buy a real 1..

www.sokendo.net/index.htm


world.choshuya.co.jp/sale/sword/index.htm
Country : Hizen
Period : Kei'an , about 350 years ago


Certificate NBTHK
Price 1,450,000 yen
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:59:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ring:
buy a real 1..
www.sokendo.net/index.htm
world.choshuya.co.jp/sale/sword/index.htm



Looks expensive...
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:06:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By UZI4you:
Cold Steel is worth the hype.

I have a lot of Cold Steel knives. They are as well built or ever better than Benchmades.


Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:22:25 AM EDT
Their Japanese swords aren’t differentially tempered. You would probably be better off with a Hanwei if you are interested in Asian swords.

Kris Cutlery in the Philippines makes some perfectly serviceable blades. They use untraditional methods but their blades are differentially hardened and cut great. Either of these would be better than Cold Steel and would cost less.

If you can go a step higher in quality then check out Bugei Trading. They use Hanwei produced blades, touch up the polishing, and give them decent fittings.

If you wanted to shell out the money for a hand forged blade then there are a lot of high quality smiths making Japanese blades. Michael Bell (Dragonfly Forge) and Howard Clark are two of the best known examples. But there are many others.

No matter what though, Japanese swords are not the super weapons that movies and cartoons make them out to be. They are actually rather fragile weapons that can be damaged by a single improperly executed cut.

European swords are somewhat more durable as well as being as light or lighter. But even they can’t cut through steel or hard wood. Swords aren’t axes or chisels they cut soft targets, they don’t bash through anything or chop through trees.

If you are interested in European swords then check out Arms and Armor, Albion Armorers, or Angus Trim. Christian Fletcher sells both Albion and ATrim blades and offers custom scabbards and hilts on some models.

All of them are just a Google search away.

I’m not saying Cold Steel swords are bad, I’m even considering getting one of their sabers, but there are usually better options out there.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:40:57 AM EDT
I had a C.S. keychain knife with their 3 layer San Mai III steel. For me I couldn't keep a sharp edge on the knife, and I sharpened the knife blade so much that the middle of the blade was bowed inward from all of the sharpening. Also the Pachmayer-type rubber scales don't last too long with the constant abrasion inside the pocket and keys, they eventually wore away and fell off.
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