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Posted: 1/10/2006 3:06:59 AM EDT
Whole of the article here.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:08:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 3:09:20 AM EDT by AROKIE]
heard about this yesterday., i beleive i read it here yesterday...
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:23:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/11/2006 4:54:18 AM EDT by vito113]
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:39:50 AM EDT
life span for us person in jap prison is like 2 years dont worry. he will get his...
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:42:18 AM EDT
POS. I hope he rots.

Max
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:47:13 AM EDT
Hey, if he's guilty, there's no cost to us for any penalty.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:48:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By maxell27:
POS. I hope he rots.

Max



+100000000000000

Obviou­sly if he's guilty
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:21:18 AM EDT
Let him die in prison, he is making our nation look bad.
And that while Japan is such a safe neat place.

Anyway, a American military prison may very well be tougher than a Japanese one... is he going to a Japanese civillian prison?
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:24:03 AM EDT
Why did those military police permit the prisoner to have his face covered?

He should have been uncovered and his face shown to the world.

Eric The(Outrageous)Hun
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:26:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 5:27:26 AM EDT by Specop_007]

Originally Posted By Bob243:

Originally Posted By maxell27:
POS. I hope he rots.

Max



+100000000000000

Obviou­sly if he's guilty



Aint much if about it...
And I agree, it was the right thing to do by handing him over.

"According to police sources, Reese admitted to Japanese police Friday to killing Yoshie Sato, 56, on Tuesday."
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:29:43 AM EDT
From what I have read, he confessed to the murder when arrested. He should have a trial and if found guilty, put before a firing squad. The guys just a farkin murderer in uniform, he deserves exactly that.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:30:23 AM EDT
"The agreement followed the rape that year of a 12-year-old girl by three U.S. servicemen in Okinawa"


OMFG when did this happen? How did The US handle this?
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:07:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By howster:
life span for us person in jap prison is like 2 years dont worry. he will get his...


Could you show a source for this?


Originally Posted By EricTheHun:
Why did those military police permit the prisoner to have his face covered?
He should have been uncovered and his face shown to the world.

Eric The(Outrageous)Hun



Probably to comply to Japanese TV ethics.
I can't understand the logic behind it,(and I have had it explained to me by several people, including a professor of law) but it is unethical to show a criminal or suspect with handcuffs on because it would be degrading to him.
Similar with faces, the TV can show pictures from before his arrest, but not after his arrest if the suspect/convict doesn't want his face shown.


Originally Posted By BillSouthCarolina:
...snip...
Anyway, a American military prison may very well be tougher than a Japanese one... is he going to a Japanese civillian prison?



I'm not sure, but I think that if convicted, he would go to a Japanese civillian prison.
I would suspect that even a US civillian prison would be tougher than a Japanese military one.

Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:15:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By USGI_45:
"The agreement followed the rape that year of a 12-year-old girl by three U.S. servicemen in Okinawa"


OMFG when did this happen? How did The US handle this?



http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9603/okinawa_rape/



Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:20:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pliftkl:

Originally Posted By USGI_45:
"The agreement followed the rape that year of a 12-year-old girl by three U.S. servicemen in Okinawa"

OMFG when did this happen? How did The US handle this?



www.cnn.com/WORLD/9603/okinawa_rape/




That isn't it.
That case happened in 1996, the one mentioned above happened last year.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:23:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pliftkl:

Originally Posted By USGI_45:
"The agreement followed the rape that year of a 12-year-old girl by three U.S. servicemen in Okinawa"


OMFG when did this happen? How did The US handle this?



http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9603/okinawa_rape/







seven years? WTF??
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:28:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Specop_007:

Originally Posted By Bob243:

Originally Posted By maxell27:
POS. I hope he rots.

Max



+100000000000000

Obviou­sly if he's guilty



Aint much if about it...
And I agree, it was the right thing to do by handing him over.

"According to police sources, Reese admitted to Japanese police Friday to killing Yoshie Sato, 56, on Tuesday."



I definately agree, it seems pretty straight forward... I just always keep the "if" until judgement is passed
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:46:27 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:08:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 7:10:36 AM EDT by ATNT]

Originally Posted By vito113:
Conditions in Japanese prisons are 'harsh', beatings are routine and frequently lead to serious injury and death.


Nether of the two links had anything like the above that I could find.
Could you please specify?
Part VI of the second link even contradicts what you say.
"Japanese prisons are generally safe places with none of the violence or gang activity that the popular cinema associates with prison life in the U.S. While the many rules and regulations at the prison may seem petty and mindless to you, they are in fact part of the overall security plan which creates a physically safe environment for the detainees. It is precisely because of this intense regimentation that the guards are able to effectively control the prison population."

From japan.usembassy.gov/e/acs/tacs-7110e.html




CONDITIONS AT PRISONS AND DETENTION FACILITIES: Japanese prisons and detention facilities maintain internal order through a regime of very strict discipline. American-citizen prisoners often complain of stark, austere living conditions and psychological isolation. A prisoner can become eligible for parole only after serving about 60-70% of his/her sentence. Early parole is not allowed for any reason--humanitarian, medical or otherwise. Access to competent interpreters is not required at all times under Japanese criminal law. More information is available at http://japan.usembassy.gov/e/acs/tacs-7110a.html
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1148.html



BTW the quite a bit of the info at both of the links is misleading/incorrect/out of date.

Edited for spelling.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:12:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:27:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 7:47:46 AM EDT by ATNT]
So is it that you can't specify the part that backs up what you said from a link that you provided?

And now it is down to choosing which to believe between the usembassy.gov and Amnesty International then?

I suppose I'll give up then...
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 8:04:57 AM EDT
in all fairness...to Vito..across the pond..

the japanese history...in general has not looked very good for any prisoner..pow routine inmate.
i wouldnt even want to comprehend what goes on in a jap pen.

there is no ACLU...

read more here..
http://www.apbnews.com/cjsystem/behind_bars/1999/12/09/japan/index.html
http://www.hrw.org/prisons/asia.html
http://www.amnestyusa.org/stoptorture/document.do?id=ED216336DBC0F551802569D10041CE9E


i­'m not a touchy feely guy..but i did grow up looking at the OKLAHOMA STATE PENNITINARY form my childhood home.

i think i might know a thing or 2 about the realities of prison life since almost all my childhood friends are now correctional officers or many members of their families are..


being a inmate in a foreign country would be horrible..hands down.

Link Posted: 1/10/2006 8:35:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ATNT:
That isn't it.
That case happened in 1996, the one mentioned above happened last year.



You're misreading the article.
"The agreement followed the rape that year of a 12-year-old girl by three U.S. servicemen in Okinawa."

The paragraph before mentiones the agreement was made in 1995.

Same case.

NTM
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 8:49:45 AM EDT
The Japs could put him to death... Believe it or not, they actually still hang people there.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:53:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 10:58:16 AM EDT by vito113]
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:13:17 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:29:19 AM EDT
I see our friends across the pond have advanced very little since WWII.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 1:05:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 1:10:48 PM EDT by Ross]
The USA has had in the past reservations about turning over servicemen to the Japanese judicial system, as it's so far different than ours, or that of Europe. In Japan the acused can be held for 23 days for interrogation before charges have to be filed. During this time, the only peole allowed to see or talk to the acused at the interogators. There's no lawyer, no bail, no way of getting out unless you confess.

Confession is looked upon by the Japanese as the ultimate evidence, and culturally fits in with their attitudes towards responsitiliby and apologizing for one's actions. If you confess, odds are you get a lighter sentence. If you plead "not guilty" as you would if you were not guilty in an American or European court, you're considered as not living up to your responsibilities for your actions and odds are you'll receive a stiff sentence. There are no juries in Japanese trials. The issue is decided by judges in the courtroom. The percentage of indictments that result in conviction runs in the 90's. The end result is that basically if the state acusses someone, they're going to jail.

It does not suprise me that this servicemember confessed, as he was doomed from the start and knew it. He is quite likely guilty, the track record is pretty good for the Japanese officials in getting the right guy, but there isn't any actual protections for the acused there.

Until 1995, the US refused to turn over servicemen to Japanese officials because the differences were so big between the justice systems. Due to several politically sensetive cases, the DoD changed their policy to "sympathetic cooperation". Though the actual SOFA hasn't changed, the idea is that the US military will turn over suspects to the Japanese. Once that's done, they can interrogate him for those 23 days, without him seeing a lawyer, any member of his command, anyone at all except his interrogators, and has no chance of getting out of jail in the meantime. Technically speaking, they don't even need to have an interpreter there (though obviously it would be somewhat of a waste of time, and question the value of the results of such interrogation).

Here's an article by a person who is basically "anti-US in Japan". Though it's a view from the left, his article is accurate as to how things are done over there.

www.japanfocus.org/article.asp?id=071

Here's another website, of USMC Major Brown mentioned in the Japan Focus article.

www.majorbrown.org/

Obviously, it's going to be one sided, being a "Free Major Brown" site, so take it for what it's worth.

This is an article on the Brown case, that includes both the "Stars and Stripes, Pacific" articles, and a Japanese article and gives a good view of how things are looked at there.

www.japanfocus.org/article.asp?id=134

While Major Brown isn't the acused in this latest case, it should give you a good idea of how things are done there in Okinawa. There are also other problems that add to this as well. Okinawa is considered by Japan kinda like Puerto Rico is to the US. Most Japanese feel that if it's better if stuff like this happens in Okinawa, rather than mainland Japan. Add to that the political and defense arrangements of the US and Japan, and also the resentment of US forces there, and you can see it's a messed up situation there.

I'm all for punishing criminals. I'm not all 100% sure Major Brown didn't get what was coming to him either. But there should be some concern about the way things are done, and what part politics plays into it.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:08:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ATNT:
So is it that you can't specify the part that backs up what you said from a link that you provided?

And now it is down to choosing which to believe between the usembassy.gov and Amnesty International then?

I suppose I'll give up then...



Are you that dense that you didn't really understand what you posted?

"Japanese prisons are generally safe places with none of the violence or gang activity that the popular cinema associates with prison life in the U.S. While the many rules and regulations at the prison may seem petty and mindless to you, they are in fact part of the overall security plan which creates a physically safe environment for the detainees. It is precisely because of this intense regimentation that the guards are able to effectively control the prison population."

This is a politically acceptable way of saying YOU DON"T WANT TO GO THERE.

Japanese prisoners are "safe" in that they don't have the gangs ours do. But they also tend to have sadistic or at least overly regimental guards. the guards tell you what to do. If you don't do it satisfactorily they can then impose corporal punishment. They are not adequately adequately air conditioned, furnished, or sanitarly equipped to American standards. The food is rough even by Japanese standards.

Since he is IIRC a black gaijin and the Japanese are extremely xenophobic and even more bigoted in regards to blacks, he will likely get a death sentence. And as noted he will only get a few hours notice and his family and the world will find out with a few sentence press release to the effect that the sentence was carried out.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:41:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PaDanby:
...snip...

Are you that dense that you didn't really understand what you posted?

"Japanese prisons are generally safe places with none of the violence or gang activity that the popular cinema associates with prison life in the U.S. While the many rules and regulations at the prison may seem petty and mindless to you, they are in fact part of the overall security plan which creates a physically safe environment for the detainees. It is precisely because of this intense regimentation that the guards are able to effectively control the prison population."

This is a politically acceptable way of saying YOU DON"T WANT TO GO THERE.

Japanese prisoners are "safe" in that they don't have the gangs ours do. But they also tend to have sadistic or at least overly regimental guards. the guards tell you what to do. If you don't do it satisfactorily they can then impose corporal punishment. They are not adequately adequately air conditioned, furnished, or sanitarly equipped to American standards. The food is rough even by Japanese standards.

Since he is IIRC a black gaijin and the Japanese are extremely xenophobic and even more bigoted in regards to blacks, he will likely get a death sentence. And as noted he will only get a few hours notice and his family and the world will find out with a few sentence press release to the effect that the sentence was carried out.



Generally, nobody wants to go to prison.
The prisons that we are discussing are Japanese ones, there is no reason that they should meet US standards.
Prisons are for punishment, so they should not be too luxury.
I would expect that many would be pissed off, if foreigners went around trying to make US prisons meet foreign standards.

"If you don't do it satisfactorily they can then impose corporal punishment."
That means that if you don't follow the rules, you get punished.
Wouldn't that be normal?

The penalty for murder in Japan as of Article 199 is death, imprisonment for life or between 3 to 15 years.
While it is certainly possible, since it is a first offence as far as I know, it would be unlikely that he would get the death sentence.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:44:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vito113:
I see no problem with that...

Robbed and murdered a 56 woman for $129....


Me neither. Better off without him.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:45:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 3:46:37 PM EDT by dport]
edit
Don't want to go down that road right now.
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