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Posted: 1/9/2006 7:05:29 AM EDT
Okay, I think it's time for me to recommend we create a Careers Forum where questions like this, as well as interview advice and contacts can be swapped. Up to the Staff, but it's an idea.



Concerning resumes: I've been out of college for 15 years. LOTS of experience, certifications, education, etc.

So....... Should a resume be one page or not?

There is no way I can fit everything onto one page in a size that can be read, unless everything I've ever learned about resumes is wrong. I have gotten feedback on my current resume that ranges from "Extremely impressive" to "Way too long".

As a hiring manager, I've never been anal about resume length, but I am about clarity and accomplishments. Mine does that well.

So, what sez da hive?
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:06:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 7:07:22 AM EDT by raven]
Why dont we set up a network of shell companies and references too? To help pad the resumes of the employment-challenged?
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:07:53 AM EDT
You should include all the highlights that would make you stand out from all the other candidates regardless of length, in my opinion.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:07:54 AM EDT
If you have the experience and training to justify it, use more than one page. All items should be relevant to the job you are seeking, of course.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:08:37 AM EDT
So long as the forum is set up and rigorously moderated to keep out trash, I'm all for it.

Hey, man, we're like family, a lot of us here, political and religious differences aside. We help each other with family issues, kabooms, and dinner pics, why not careers?
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:12:28 AM EDT
I paid $175 to have somebody write my resume, and it was the best money I ever spent. It's written to appeal to HR-types. The actual decision makers were wooed in person.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:13:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 7:14:00 AM EDT by fight4yourrights]
Single page hightlights with attached Reference pages.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:13:55 AM EDT
You’re sending a cover letter along with each resume, yes?

I think the 'one page or not' controversy can best be put to rest by including a strong one page rez, and then creating a near-generic cover letter with interchangeable bullet points that you feel best aims your background towards specific needs of the company you're sending it to.

Check out the line of “Resumes That Knock ‘em Dead” books by Martin Yates and you can chuck your resume worries out the window.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:18:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 7:19:59 AM EDT by _DR]
In the IT sector(at least where I have have worked) multipage resumes are the norm.

When we hire new people, they look for keywords. That's one thing you want to worry about. find out what keyowrds they are looking for for a particular job. Once you get in for the tech interview, if you know your stuff and you are not an ass, you'll stand a good chance, but getting there often means having the right keywords they are looking for. Sad, but that's the way they do it here (15,000 employee international Software/Data service company).
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:22:59 AM EDT
'Only Lee Iacocca needs a resume longer than one page.'

At least that is what I have been told throughout the years.

Keep it short and informative, clean and concise.

Save the long dissertations for your interview.

Eric The(OverEmployed)Hun
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:24:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dolomite:
You’re sending a cover letter along with each resume, yes?

I think the 'one page or not' controversy can best be put to rest by including a strong one page rez, and then creating a near-generic cover letter with interchangeable bullet points that you feel best aims your background towards specific needs of the company you're sending it to.

Check out the line of “Resumes That Knock ‘em Dead” books by Martin Yates and you can chuck your resume worries out the window.



I go through recruiters, which pretty much negates the need for cover letters. When I send one direct, then yes, I send one, of course.

I've looked at those books. Not bad. What frustrates me is the contradictions one hears. One-page only. Two-page max. Yadda-yadda. Drives me up the fucking wall. One book contradicts the other, etc....

Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:27:40 AM EDT
A proper resume is 2 pages in length, and contains only relevant experience and credentials tailored to the position you are applying for. Even if the experience is in the same field, different employers require different responsibilities for a position.

For instance, a HRM at one company may do nothing but payroll. But at another organization, that same position might require the individual to do project management, payroll, counseling, and advertising employment opportunities.

In the former instance, the only experience they want to wade through to verify is your ability to successfully manage payroll. The latter will require you to tailor your qualifications to annotate experience in all facets of the position. Your resume will be different for every job and every company, targeting the specific organization and their needs - this helps keep it concise while providing them proof of your qualifications.

An electrician seeking a plumbing position would include construction experience and their knowledge of tools. It does no good to boast about running work, because being an electrical foreman has nothing to do with a plumber's apprentice. You mention it just enough to let the potential employer know you have been trusted with the responsibility, but elaboration means squat. Likewise, bending conduit, pulling wire, and motor controls shouldn't go on the resume... They have no bearing in the plumbing industry and only detract from the qualifications they seek. No one wants to muddle through a bunch of information to find pertinent qualifications.

The average time reading a resume is 2 minutes. You want them to see only the qualities best suited for the position in that time. That's what makes some resumes go to the pile that gets closely examined, while others are filed for later consideration. You want to be at the top of the pile.

I work very closely with an excellent lady at my college who has been writing resumes for 30+ years now. If you'd like help, shoot me a PM.

Also, go to this site: www.about.com

They have tons of great information on resumes and job seeking, all for free.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:28:16 AM EDT
NEGATIVE! It should be one page. Companies that receive MANY resumes don't spend more than 30 seconds looking over each one. Put it on one page. If you put it all on paper, when a prospective employer asks you to elaborate on a particular job, he will have read all the info you might be relating. It's good to have info that you present that's new and beyond what's on your resume.

The ONLY function of your resume is to get you to the next step: the interview.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:31:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:31:41 AM EDT
Here's some great ideas and advice on cover letters:

jobsearch.about.com/od/coverletters/index.htm?nl=1
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:35:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jtb33:
NEGATIVE! It should be one page. Companies that receive MANY resumes don't spend more than 30 seconds looking over each one. Put it on one page. If you put it all on paper, when a prospective employer asks you to elaborate on a particular job, he will have read all the info you might be relating. It's good to have info that you present that's new and beyond what's on your resume.

The ONLY function of your resume is to get you to the next step: the interview.



I stand corrected - I was using data from the construction industry.

From jobsearch.about.com/c/ec/8.htm



Your resume is usually the first impression an employer will have of you - it needs to market your relevant skills, knowledge, and accomplishments. Employers usually only spend 30 seconds or so reviewing each resume, therefore, that first impression needs to be the one that counts. It's important to take the time to compose well written, grammatically correct and error free resumes and cover letters. This class will step you through the process of creating effective job search correspondence and includes writing tips and suggestions, samples and answers to your resume and cover letter questions.

Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:41:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
I paid $175 to have somebody write my resume, and it was the best money I ever spent. It's written to appeal to HR-types. The actual decision makers were wooed in person.



My wife wants to have that done for her, did you have someone locally do it for you or someone online?
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:46:26 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 8:06:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 10:25:56 AM EDT
a 15 year resume should be 2 to 3 pages I would think.
I would expect you to have 3 to 7 jobs, that's going to take 2 pages, plus the skills
if you had a 15 year career with one page, it means that you worked for one company and I don't want to hire you
but that's just me.

Brian
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 11:53:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BozemanMT:
a 15 year resume should be 2 to 3 pages I would think.
I would expect you to have 3 to 7 jobs, that's going to take 2 pages, plus the skills
if you had a 15 year career with one page, it means that you worked for one company and I don't want to hire you
but that's just me.

Brian



No one who has a 15 year career puts ALL their jobs on a resume. It's typical to only put the last few jobs you have had.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 11:59:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:
In the IT sector(at least where I have have worked) multipage resumes are the norm.

When we hire new people, they look for keywords. That's one thing you want to worry about. find out what keyowrds they are looking for for a particular job. Once you get in for the tech interview, if you know your stuff and you are not an ass, you'll stand a good chance, but getting there often means having the right keywords they are looking for. Sad, but that's the way they do it here (15,000 employee international Software/Data service company).



Not to hi-jack thread... You work in cube farm hell!
My assumptions anyhow..
I hated the cubes I had to hack away in, so I bought 3 more and had one biggun. Still a cube though!
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 12:02:33 PM EDT

...regardless of length...


I didn't realize I needed to put that info in my resume. Maybe that's why I'm not CEO!!
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 2:46:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BigBang:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
I paid $175 to have somebody write my resume, and it was the best money I ever spent. It's written to appeal to HR-types. The actual decision makers were wooed in person.



My wife wants to have that done for her, did you have someone locally do it for you or someone online?



Online. Monster.com, actually. After reading it, I said "Shit, I'd hire me!"
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 2:51:24 PM EDT
Could you post a sample of it edited to remove personel information or anything that would ID you
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 2:54:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 3:20:44 PM EDT
Too much to say, too poor at typing.
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