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Posted: 1/7/2006 7:51:29 PM EDT
Ok Grammer Nazis and ppl who know about English.

There is a river in England called the Thames. But its pronouced 'Tims'

And there are lots of ppl named James, and we nickname them Jim.

But how the hell do you get Jack out of John or Jonathan?
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:53:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2006 7:53:46 PM EDT by 2IDdoc]
I think people here need to focus on more basic problems like the words, "to/too" and "loose/lose". We're working up to complicated grammar and English in steps.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:53:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2006 7:54:27 PM EDT by VoodooChile]

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
Ok Grammer Nazis and ppl who know about English.

There is a river in England called the Thames. But its pronouced 'Tims'

And there are lots of ppl named James, and we nickname them Jim.

But how the hell do you get Jack out of John or Jonathan?




Grammar...and you got the makings of a great gay joke there somewhere
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:54:36 PM EDT
Basically with proper names, you can spell your name 'S-H-I-T" and pronounce it Joe.

SG
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:55:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
Ok Grammer Nazis and ppl who know about English.

There is a river in England called the Thames. But its pronouced 'Tims'

And there are lots of ppl named James, and we nickname them Jim.

But how the hell do you get Jack out of John or Jonathan?



Perhaps from Jacob?
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:55:53 PM EDT
Richard--->Rich--->Rick--->Dick...
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:56:20 PM EDT
Hmm. Jake and Jack from Jacob.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:57:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
Ok Grammer Nazis and ppl who know about English.

There is a river in England called the Thames. But its pronouced 'Tims'

And there are lots of ppl named James, and we nickname them Jim.

But how the hell do you get Jack out of John or Jonathan?



I pronounce Thames as Tems.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:59:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyquik:


But how the hell do you get Jack




I have NEVER understood that !!!


I think it happens in families where there is more than one John, maybe ??
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 7:59:42 PM EDT

At least they start with the same letter.

I could never figure out how one got from "Margaret" to "Peggy".
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 8:00:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
Ok Grammer Nazis and ppl who know about English.

There is a river in England called the Thames. But its pronouced 'Tims'

And there are lots of ppl named James, and we nickname them Jim.

But how the hell do you get Jack out of John or Jonathan?



The name "Jack" is probably derived from "Jacob" (via the French "Jacques"). Alternatively, it may be derived from "Jankin" meaning literally "Little John". The surname "Jenkins" also derives from "Jankin". Looking up "Jack" and related words in the dictionary is very interesting ("jack-ass", and "jack-rabbit" for instance), but ultimately unsatisfying. Webster's dictionary states that it means "a man" or alternatively "an object or device". This seems to cover most things. Brewers dictionary of phrase and fable adds
"Jack-a-Lent. A half-starved, sheepish booby. Shakespeare says: "You little Jack-a-lent, have you been true to us?" (Merry Wives of Windsor, iii. 3.) A kind of Aunt Sally which was thrown at in Lent. (See Cleveland's Poems [1660], p. 64.)"
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 8:01:57 PM EDT
It's algebra:

John / 5 (3.14) A - [sum= Q *A2] sq^3 / (87) = Jack...

duh
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 8:06:06 PM EDT
Blame the French. Jacques = John in French, and you can probably figure out Jack from Jacques.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 8:08:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:
Blame the French. Jacques = John in French, and you can probably figure out Jack from Jacques.



last name = Meeoff
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 8:09:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:
Blame the French. Jacques = John in French, and you can probably figure out Jack from Jacques.



last name = Meeoff



or Strapp
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 9:26:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Fly-Navy:

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
Ok Grammer Nazis and ppl who know about English.

There is a river in England called the Thames. But its pronouced 'Tims'

And there are lots of ppl named James, and we nickname them Jim.

But how the hell do you get Jack out of John or Jonathan?



I pronounce Thames as Tems.



So do most Brits, but in Connecticut they call it the "Thames"

And then there is Athol, Massachusetts and the Athol Highlanders who wear their Atholl bonnets, but we won't go there today.

As far as Jack and John are concerned, hey this is the English language and English names we're talking about. Neither have made a lot of sense in centuries. It's been a nickname for centuries, just like "Peg" or Peggy" are nicknames for Margaret

English has to be one of the most screwy languages around.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:15:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VoodooChile:

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
Ok Grammer Nazis and ppl who know about English.

There is a river in England called the Thames. But its pronouced 'Tims'

And there are lots of ppl named James, and we nickname them Jim.

But how the hell do you get Jack out of John or Jonathan?




Grammar...and you got the makings of a great gay joke there somewhere




I think its queer when people insist on using names like Timothy instead of Tim or Michael instead of Mike or Steven instead of Steve. You get the idea. If you use the long version of one of those types of names you are most likely gay and suffer from a condition known as Homoerectis. The wang is hugeified not by a woman but by a man.


Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:20:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By crazyquik:


But how the hell do you get Jack




I have NEVER understood that !!!


I think it happens in families where there is more than one John, maybe ??



You are spot on!!!! I come from a family of three John's, I am called Jack by my close family so as not to cause confusion. My GrandDad's nick name was Jack, so I think it's an honor to by my nickname, my Granddad was an Iwo Jima Vet.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 9:50:31 AM EDT

I think its queer when people insist on using names like Timothy instead of Tim or Michael instead of Mike or Steven instead of Steve. You get the idea. If you use the long version of one of those types of names you are most likely gay and suffer from a condition known as Homoerectis. The wang is hugeified not by a woman but by a man.


I go by either, but I think it's the ghey when somebody runs there mouth about someone and doesn't know them.

Michael

Link Posted: 1/8/2006 10:07:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2006 10:08:14 AM EDT by nightstalker]
The connection between Jack and John is lost, likewise, Margaret and Peggy. I think they are the real basis for existentialism, and affirm "existence is prior to essence"
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 10:22:31 AM EDT
Here in NYC there is street called Houston. The thing is, the retards up here pronounce it "How-ston"

Anyone know why?
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 10:32:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mcantu:
Here in NYC there is street called Houston. The thing is, the retards up here pronounce it "How-ston"

Anyone know why?



I think Houston has been spelled Howston also, hence the different pronunciations. Check out Georgia, they pronounce it different too.

gagen.i-found-it.net/houston.html

ETA, SOHO, the area in New York, is shorthand for "South of Houston Street"

Tribeca is shorthand for "Triangle below Canal"

Link Posted: 1/8/2006 10:53:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:
You are spot on!!!! I come from a family of three John's, I am called Jack by my close family so as not to cause confusion. My GrandDad's nick name was Jack, so I think it's an honor to by my nickname, my Granddad was an Iwo Jima Vet.

Its definitely a family thing, every branch of my family has either the first or second-born son named John or Jon.

My dad was John the IV, everyone calls him Jack. I was also named John, but with a different middle name (Andrew), so everyone called me Andy until high school, now I stick with John since its less childish.

Kharn
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 11:55:53 AM EDT
AFAIK it's because John in French is Jacque, prounced pretty much like "Jack" with a little different character to the "a" sound.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 12:07:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2006 12:08:05 PM EDT by npd233]

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
Ok Grammer Nazis and ppl who know about English.

There is a river in England called the Thames. But its pronouced 'Tims'

And there are lots of ppl named James, and we nickname them Jim.

But how the hell do you get Jack out of John or Jonathan?



You cough.



Originally Posted By jblachly:
AFAIK it's because John in French is Jacque, prounced pretty much like "Jack" with a little different character to the "a" sound.



John is Jean
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 12:32:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mcantu:
Here in NYC there is street called Houston. The thing is, the retards up here pronounce it "How-ston"

Anyone know why?



Probably the same reason RODEO drive in Kalifornia is pronounces "row-day-oh"

No Expert
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 4:20:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By No_Expert:

Originally Posted By mcantu:
Here in NYC there is street called Houston. The thing is, the retards up here pronounce it "How-ston"

Anyone know why?



Probably the same reason RODEO drive in Kalifornia is pronounces "row-day-oh"

No Expert



Rodeos in most of California are pronounced that way. There is some reason for it but I can't remember what it is.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 4:24:06 PM EDT
crazyquik is also know as beerbelly scratchinbutt.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 11:16:21 PM EDT
Because Rodeo is pronounced roedayoh (actually almost roetheyoh) in spanish and that particular road (assuming you mean Rodeo Dr/Rd in the west LA area) was once associated with where they held rowdayohs in the old days.

Most but not all spanish names for cities, towns, streets etc are pronouced correctly by the rules of spanish pronunciation Vowels being a=ah, e=ay (as in hay), i=ee, o=oh, u=ooh. Los, as in Los Angeles, Los Robles is often pronounced Lahs instead of Loes.

I have a friend whose last name is Hough and she has found 7 different ways her name could be correctly pronounced in English. how, who, huff, hoe, hugh, ow, hug
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