Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 1/7/2006 9:52:21 AM EDT
How Prepared For War Was The USA When We Entered Into WWII?
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 9:52:51 AM EDT
It wasn't.

At all.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 9:54:13 AM EDT
we were at the tail end of a massive economic depression, we werent ready for jack or shit
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 9:59:56 AM EDT
Not true. FDR knew war was inevitible pretty early on, around early 1940. He had the military secretly assess what was needed for a full scale war with Germany and how long it would take the US to gear up for an invasion of Europe. The soonest was 1943, and pretty accurately, that's the year we landed in Italy.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:00:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2006 10:01:20 AM EDT by Leisure_Shoot]
We were pretending a war was the furthest thing from reality.
We were acting as though Hitler and Japan were too far away to harm us.

ETA: I agree with the FDR assessment, but as a whole, the nation was still 95% isolationist.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:01:53 AM EDT
After watching all the documentaries on the local PBS stations KCET-Los Angeles, KLCS-Los Angeles, KOCE-Huntington Beach CA, and KVCR-Riverside CA, the USA was not even close to be being prepared.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:03:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2006 10:04:28 AM EDT by NoHarmNoFAL-01]
Our small arms and ordnace was running pretty well because of the Lend Lease but as for tanks and airplanes we were poorly equiped. I think I read somewhere that our military as a whole was ranked just below Spain. The depression had just kicked us in the junk so we were pretty bad off.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:04:32 AM EDT
we werent....

but the wheels didnt take long to get rolling on the mighty machine that WAS American technology and manufacturing...

The Giant awoke
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:16:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL-01:
Our small arms and ordnace was running pretty well because of the Lend Lease but as for tanks and airplanes we were poorly equiped. I think I read somewhere that our military as a whole was ranked just below Spain. The depression had just kicked us in the junk so we were pretty bad off.



There is a slight misconception regarding the US's Lend-Lease act.
The act was agreed in March 1941, but agreements were not signed with other countries until Feb 1942, I believe. By which time, the US was already at war with the Japs, but not engaged in Europe.

It's true to say that although the USA had inklings about Japanese intentions, Pearl Harbour really did catch the US with her pants down, but with your industrial might, it didn't take long for you to get up to speed.

As for war with Germany, I believe that the US had been trying to remain neutral. This was always going to be a losing battle and eventually you would be dragged into the war.
I think it was late 1042 or early '43 before Lend-lease supplies started getting through to Allies in Europe

Mark
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:24:06 AM EDT
It depends.

The US Navy was reasonably well prepared, and getting more so; a huge naval construction program was underway, which was why so many ships came on line in 1943-44. The Army Air Forces were mostly OK; there were obsolete types, but most air arms of the time were somewhat spotty, and the US aircraft industry was preparing to crank out many modern types. The army wasn't well prepared at all, and its doctrine was out of date.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:34:40 AM EDT
McGredo's about got it nailed.

Once the Washington Treaty was abandoned in the later '30s, all sides started a serious naval construction programme. The US was focused, justifiably enough, on Japan and its ongoing wars of conquest, but not Europe so much.

Once WWII kicked off, the Americans realised that perhaps the Army needs a bit of work after all, and started a serious reorganisation and re-equipping programme, which wasn't completed by the time the US joined in in 1941.

NTM
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:51:05 AM EDT
By the time we entered WWII, the depression had ended in the US. As the "Arsenal of Democracy", many factories were already working on weapons manufacturing. Roosevelt did not end the Depression in the U.S. WWII did. One ofthe reasons Americans did not want to get involved was that they were making too much money supplying our allies with weapons. As a neutral country we were profiting quite handsomely off WWII.

In mid 1941, the two most modern battleships in the world out to sea. The North Carolina and the Washington. BB55 and BB56. Weapons manufacturing was ramping up and lots of new designs were on the drawing boards or just coming out. What we did not have was much of a standing military. Some of this was Roosevelt's fault as he had just promised not to send our boys to fight on foreign soil in the elections of 1940. The draft had passed by one vote and there was a very strong anti-war movement. People remembered the trenches of only 23 years before and didn't think Europe was worth that many American lives again.

Those who knew tht was was inevitable, such as Roosevelt, had backed themselves into aposition where they knew the only way America would unite was if and when we were attacked. So basically he waited until that moment to occur. They had a pretty good idea that the Japanese would attack us on December 7, but did not grasp where, or how powerful that attack would be.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:53:41 AM EDT
More prepared than Italy, but that ain't saying much...

Let's put it this way, lots of folks running around with 03' Springfields in 1942.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:59:42 AM EDT
The Pacific fighting like on Wake Island and Guadal Canal (sp) the Marines were using WWI arms and ammo. 1919's and 30cals and 1903's
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 11:02:09 AM EDT
Not at all.When the germans bombed pearl harbor,all that stood between the US and having to speak chinese were the brave fighting men of france
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 11:10:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By raven:
Not true. FDR knew war was inevitible pretty early on, around early 1940. He had the military secretly assess what was needed for a full scale war with Germany and how long it would take the US to gear up for an invasion of Europe. The soonest was 1943, and pretty accurately, that's the year we landed in Italy.




Yep, and in light of current events, it kinda makes me wonder what intentions and thoughts dubya might have for nations like china, venezuela and even russia as well as the normal cast of characters like syria, north korea and iran.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 11:19:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TacticalStrat:
How Prepared For War Was The USA When We Entered Into WWII?



Umm, you left off the rest of yor essay.
Top Top