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Posted: 1/5/2006 5:42:52 PM EDT
So I've been seeing this really cool young lady, And this really cool young lady has a really cool young boy(6yrs). Other than being a bit sissyifed he's a good smart young kid. Anyway, Someone gave him a BB gun for Xmas last year but mom has'nt let him mess with it much, Afraid I suppose.

She's asked me to help teach him, and Ive accepted. "Daddy" stuff is kinda new to me but Im likeing it. Whats the best advice you guys can give to a Dog in my position? Im not really worried about him shooting well as much as I am him shooting safe. I thought abouit printing out the basic rules and quizing him on them. Stupid idea? What says you?........................Udog
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:45:03 PM EDT
Patience. That is what you need the most of with a youngster.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:51:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Patience. That is what you need the most of with a youngster.





+1. A BIG +1!
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:52:15 PM EDT
Try to make it fun while still learning safty, if all you do is keep pounding rules he will get bored with it rather quickly.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:52:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Patience. That is what you need the most of with a youngster.





+1. A BIG +1!
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:52:21 PM EDT
This ARFCOM daddy says keep it simple, safe, and make sure he has fun.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:52:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Patience. That is what you need the most of with a youngster.



+100000


As far as teaching him gun safety stuff.. never to young to learn that....

At 4 my boy knew "never put your finger on the trigger until your ready to shoot" and "never point a gun at something you don't want to shoot" hes 7 now and handles a rifle better than alot of the people I see at the range.. I am thinking this is the summer he goes shooting with me.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:52:27 PM EDT
Drill him on the 4 rules. Secure the BB gun if he violates any, try again an hour or so later.

This worked on SBK at age 4, and he could recite the 4 rules before he could add.

Good luck, teaching a kid to shoot is ablast for both parties. Jus don't expect Olympic marksmanship.

Ops
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:53:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2006 5:55:03 PM EDT by Ops]
Double tap.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:55:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 6:12:26 PM EDT
Show him how the first time, but let him have as much hands on as possible. Resist the temptation to show him how it is done... whether shooting the BB gun, building models, or whatever.

Things he does will not have to be perfect... it just needs to be his work. So what if the BB's aren't all in the black, if some of them are on the paper, that's OK. So what if the the decals aren't quite straight on the model, he did it himself, and that is what is important.

Show him once, let him do it, and help ONLY if he asks for help.

Take it easy on the failures... there will be a lot. Use the method, "that's OK, let's try again." Then when he succeeds, really praise him. "Man, you are doing a lot better than I did when I was your age!" Praise goes a LONG way.

Have fun, enjoy watching him grow up.

I got a call when my oldest was in boot camp. He was able to get to a phone while out buying groceries for the 4th of July BBQ. Apparently he had demonstrated enough skill in most things they were doing, and responsibility, the Sgt gave him keys and cash and sent him to town shopping.

He called and said, "Dad, I just wanted you to know, I used to hate some of the stuff you made me do when I was a kid. But I know now you were teaching me the things I needed to know. I am up here with a bunch of pussies that don't know how to do anything. Anyway, I just called to tell you thanks."

I was speechless, almost. I asked, "Who are you and what did you do with my real son?"

Seriously, your job is to guide him, but let him do and learn on his own.

If you are painting, put him in some old clothes, give him a brush, and some wood to paint. If you are working on the car, find something for him to do.

OK, that's your job. Everything else in life is secondary.

Link Posted: 1/5/2006 8:42:28 PM EDT
He's at an impressionable age. Make it interesting, but stress the safety. Regardless if you prefer the 4 rules or the 10 commandments of gun safety, make sure he knows and follows them. Make it interesting for him-set him up with some reactive targets to draw his attention.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 9:01:51 PM EDT
Make sure he doesn't shoot his eye out.

Link Posted: 1/5/2006 9:05:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
This ARFCOM daddy says keep it simple, safe, and make sure he has fun.




+1

Have a hoot teaching him how to shoot!!!!
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 9:13:16 PM EDT
Make it interesting for him. Reaction targets= fun.

Also, don't try to much to fast and for to long. Kids at that age still have a fairly short attention span. Better to teach in many short sessions rather than 1 long one.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 9:29:36 PM EDT
all of those post are good

be patient
make it fun
keep it safe
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 9:31:32 PM EDT
Screw accuracy, screw hitting the target, screw breathing, or most anything to do with aiming other than sight picture.

Just stress handling and function for a while, the skill comes later, AFTER he learns how to handle the gun safely instinctively.

Also, make an example of something to show what even a bb gun can do. When teaching my nephew, I used a pellet and an apple, he got the point.

Boiled down:

Teach handling, function, and respect. The trick is making it fun.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 6:28:34 AM EDT
IF you need me too I can show the kid the fake tooth that I have and the scar in my lip from being shot w/ a BB Gun (by a "friend")

As long as he shoots safe its cool to do things with youngsters.


Link Posted: 1/6/2006 6:33:39 AM EDT
All of the above posts are good--you also need to remember that a 6 year old has a SHORT attention span. He may be done after 15 or 20 minutes, and that's ok. Don't force him to continue, just pick it up again another day.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 6:34:16 AM EDT
Muzzle control is the best thing you can teach with a BB gun.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 6:34:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By David_Hineline:
In my opinion you should have minimal interation with the children of the women you are dating. Once/When it gets serious then get introduced to the kids and bond with them.

What does it do to the kid to have lost his dad for what ever reason only to bond with date dad of the month then to loose that dad also?



Dave, I love ya man. You're such a beacon of "positive" attitude.

But you do usually make a good point when you opine.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 6:38:15 AM EDT
At that age develop trust with him by being his cool (but responsible) older buddy. Create an image that your the "cool" guy and keep it up and not only will it last, single moms get drippin over guys good with the kids.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 7:24:38 AM EDT
man DO NOT print any material and quiz him on it.
just explain it and make it interesting, all the while stressing SAFTEY!

Don't worry about him being a bit sissyfied. Mothers can do that, and she being a single parent does not help. That is where you come in, if you take the responsibility.

I am a single parent. My son is seven years old. I believe i have thought him well about the safty and dangers of handling a firearm. He has shot a several of my guns.

A 12 gauge with a light shell. He held it himself. Well I held with one hand while I was directly behind him, just to help w/recoil.
My SIGPro 2340 .40 cal. When I gave it to him to shoot. There was a round in the chamber but not cocked (FINGER OF THE TRIGGER) when he told me he was ready. I cocked it for him (standing behind him) then i told him when your ready put your finger on the trigger and shoot. I also placed my hand over his (not gripping) to help with recoil.
My M4 same thing; safty on, finger of trigger, ready safty shoot.
Also a Bersa 380.

After shooting these guns he only like to shoot the M4 and Bersa. He does not like the others because "Dad it kicks to hard a it's to loud."

Before you let him shoot any thing explain to him the different parts of a gun/rifle. Don't get to deep, keep it simple.Have his BB gun empty while you teach him. Teach him how to aim then load and unload (BB gun).
FINGER OF THE TRIGGER untill your ready to shoot.

Now when you are ready to teach him to shot a real gun do the sam as above.
You can also get him an Airsoft gun. My son like his.
Yet remember to teach him to treat it just like a real gun. No playing in the house with it. It's a gun

You'll do fine!
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 7:30:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2006 7:32:08 AM EDT by Mantis_51]
To me experience is the best teacher and remember:

Monkey see, Monkey do

So what ever you do, he will copy you, no matter how much you try to tell him.

Have fun, but "show" him the safe way to shot and be sure to use lots of positive reinforcement when he does something right.

If he keeps his finger off of the triger until he shoots, then praise him on it, if not show him how to do it, same goes for the other rules.

Have fun and be safe
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 7:43:25 AM EDT
Leave the exams at home, with kids it needs to be about having fun. Try and loose the coach attitude and put yourself more in his world. You can get some paper cups and have him dry fire air at them from a foot or two away until you are sure he is handling it safely. Then set up a big target at close range so he'll have success right off the bat. Have fun and teach him to be safe. Shoot something like a glass so he learns that those BB's can do damage before he does something stupid.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 7:49:03 AM EDT
Make sure the child has some fun, ie he/she finds it enjoyable. Do it with the child. And don't overload the little kid with a bunch of rules like an adult. Many Adult are stupid, kid are different they try to follow the rules.

BTW: if the child doesn't have any eye protection there are small versions of them available at the local sporting goods store and even Wall-Mart occassionally.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 7:51:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Patience. That is what you need the most of with a youngster.



Big time. I have a hard time of that with my own son, but he's only 2 years old right now. Repeat the rules over and over until he gets it drilled into his head. Kids have such a short attention span it's a good thing to keep repeating what you're telling them so it soaks in.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 7:54:14 AM EDT
Saltine crackers make great reactive targets and the birds will clean up the mess.

Keep it fun, but safe.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 7:59:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ops:
Drill him on the 4 rules. Secure the BB gun if he violates any, try again an hour or so later.

This worked on SBK at age 4, and he could recite the 4 rules before he could add.

Good luck, teaching a kid to shoot is ablast for both parties. Jus don't expect Olympic marksmanship.

Ops



Yup... four rules over and over. This will help with mom and he will tell his friends. I am proud of my t two children...7 & 9.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 8:07:38 AM EDT
Keep one thing in mind: Their brains do no function like that of an adult. You can quiz him and he may know all the safety rules, but he is still a child and simply knowing those rules won't mean he'll follow them when left unattended - this is speaking from experience.

There's also a possible disconnect between rote memorization of the rules, and having a good understanding what it means to follow them in practice.

My son does very well, but I still make sure I'm close to him. They just don't know how their actions will affect the position of the muzzle at times.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 8:10:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By photokirk:
Saltine crackers make great reactive targets and the birds will clean up the mess.

Keep it fun, but safe.



Very true, I sent many a saltine to its grave with a .177 lead messenger in the day.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 8:10:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By photokirk:
Saltine crackers make great reactive targets and the birds will clean up the mess.

Keep it fun, but safe.



Whoa! Great idea!
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 8:11:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Patience. That is what you need the most of with a youngster.



Most elegant description of parenthood ever.

+1,000,000,000,000
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 8:21:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By underdog75:
So I've been seeing this really cool young lady, And this really cool young lady has a really cool young boy(6yrs). Other than being a bit sissyifed he's a good smart young kid. Anyway, Someone gave him a BB gun for Xmas last year but mom has'nt let him mess with it much, Afraid I suppose.

She's asked me to help teach him, and Ive accepted. "Daddy" stuff is kinda new to me but Im likeing it. Whats the best advice you guys can give to a Dog in my position? Im not really worried about him shooting well as much as I am him shooting safe. I thought abouit printing out the basic rules and quizing him on them. Stupid idea? What says you?........................Udog



I'm not a dad but I was a kid.

Try not to make it work as much as possible. While it is important he knows the safety rules, don't make it like a test. Best trick is to let him be "impressed" with himself and his ability to know these things. Stuff like "I bet you are on of the few kids I know who can remember all the rules" goes along way.

Positive reinforcement and patience are key when dealing with a good kid.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 8:47:27 AM EDT
When I taught my daughter to shoot (with a .22 bolt action) the sequence of events went like this:

1. Memorize the four basic rules of safe firearms handling (doesn't take long). After she could recite them from memory I got the rifle from the safe.

2. Went over the handling and operation with the rifle (no ammo!) in the house. After coaching and practice showed that she had the fundamentals we were ready for a trip to the range. (Ever try to teach somebody at the range while other people were shooting? Noise, distractions, etc.)

3. At the range we reviewed everything. I had her remove the 7-round magazine, then I handed her one bullet and said, "Load it." She did and I coached her through her first shot OK. After a few more single shots I saw that she had a handle on things and let her load the full mag.

The key to the success was strong fundamentals before hitting the range.

Shortly after this I got her a 10/22 of her own. She also wants my Springfield XD9 when she gets older.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 1:35:37 PM EDT
Man, you've gotten some really good advise.

As far as the shooting goes, the only thing I would add is don't go expecting to do a lot of shooting yourself. Take the time to make it about him. Make sure it is a good time for him, and you will have a life long shooter. Plus, you showing interest in him is just as important as anything you do, and will make it much easier for you to deal with him later on, if you stay with his mom.


My boy is 14 and I married his mom when he was four. He sees his real dad regularly, but he has said that that's just his father, I'm his "dad" (even though he doesn't call me dad). He wasn't a sissy, but he was kind of a "soft" kid when I got him. Too much of "mommy". I had work on Mom, and get her to back off and not pamper him so much. He went from a skinny, shy kid who was in the hospital all the time with asthma, to starting strong safety (and best tackler) on his 8th grade football team, all-star level baseball player and the fastest kid in his grade at school. The hard thing for me was to back off and learn not to push too hard. It was rough starting out, but we finally adjusted to each other. Good luck. I hope your relationship turns out as well as ours has.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 1:55:17 PM EDT
lead by example, demonstrate and ephasize safety, When he is old enough a good gun safety course is a good idea. Teach him that all weapons are not toys but are tools to be respected and handled safely above all. also good luck I hope you go the distance not many seem to these days.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 1:59:50 PM EDT
Empty can targets provide a welcome audio-visual feedback for youngsters. Make pyramids out of them, shoot out the ends. Have fun.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 2:20:44 PM EDT
Spend some time together drawing paper targets. The saltines is a great idea, as well as demonstrating the effects a bb gun would have on an apple. When you have all your ducks in a row, shoot em down.
Have fun, with emphasis on safety.
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