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Posted: 1/4/2006 8:57:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2006 9:08:03 AM EDT by Specop_007]
Work in progress.

This shit sucks, but the worst part (Ceiling) is for the most part done. Yes, I know it doesnt look too hot, first time working with sheetrock. Nothing some tape, alot of mud and sanding wont take care of.












Forgot the gun pic.
Heres my little helper (As seen above)

Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:01:45 AM EDT
I've done worse.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:03:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2006 9:03:53 AM EDT by Cleatus]
...rond hole...square peg....


peel those paper ends off before mounting- they just get in the way
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:07:50 AM EDT
Dude, you gotta rip the paper off the end of the boards !!!!!
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:08:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2006 9:09:32 AM EDT by nf9648]

Originally Posted By Pault:
Dude, you gotta rip the paper off the end of the boards !!!!!



Hahaha, I noticed that too!!! Routers work for light fixtures really well, best if you practice on electrica outlets first to get the hang of it.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:08:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Pault:
Dude, you gotta rip the paper off the end of the boards !!!!!



DOH
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:13:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2006 9:14:08 AM EDT by OrARGB]
Finger off trigger and you need more screws in the field especially on the lid (ceiling). Good work though keep it up.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:19:28 AM EDT
once you tape and mud it will look fine, I did my garage a few years back, nothing like on the job training
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:19:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By OrARGB:
Finger off trigger and you need more screws in the field especially on the lid (ceiling). Good work though keep it up.



Fingers not on the trigger

Still finishing putting screws in. There'll be 4 per stud so it should be held up pretty good. I justwanted to get them up there so I could take the liftback.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:20:10 AM EDT
Not too bad for a first timer.
Now on to the mud.
My first (and last ) job I didnt feather out the joints enough
and they really stuck out after the paint was on.


Good luck and keep us updated.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:20:34 AM EDT
you need some more screws.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:29:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2006 9:30:06 AM EDT by Cleatus]

Originally Posted By JBowles:
you need some more screws.



screw that

by the way..its one of those new fangled light fixture/heat duct combo fixtures.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:36:34 AM EDT
I remodeled my downstairs last spring. I've got a whole new respect for the guys that do that shit day in day out. My drywall tip: use the biggest sheets of drywall you can and hire a mud and tape guy.

~Dg84
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:38:27 AM EDT
I have no drywall skillz
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:45:58 AM EDT
Yup, finger is above the trigger.




ByteTheBullet (-:
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:50:15 AM EDT
The picture of the crack smoking robot was pretty sweet. Your daughter has good taste in firearms. BTW she's adorable. My little girl is almost two, and your daughter looks like she could be my daughters older sister.

It's fun to have "help" doing work around the house isn't it?
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 9:55:46 AM EDT
Not bad for a first time bro!

You'll save yourself a shitload of mudding and sanding if you get those seams some more screws and as flat as possible. And yeah, remove the end paper.

Don't use lightweight mud for the first seaming coat. It can bubble your tape. Use a light undercoat, then install your tape and press in with your 6" knife. Then apply the overcoat thick with your 6", and flatten with a 12" knife, putting pressure on the outside edge (so that you are pushing the lines towards the middle of the tape). Then hit the center again with your 12" with light pressure to create a flat seam with few edge lines.

Once that is dry, sand down high spots and ridges. Then, do a second coat that floats out from the center to the edges to avoid the seam looking higher than the board (especially true on the deck, where the lights really cast shadows). Sand and smooth again after dry. Finally, apply the third coat with lightweight mud and feather it out to close imperfections and remove lines. This final coat shouldonly need very minimal sanding.

Hint:

You have lots of furniture in there, so I recommend sanding "wet." Take a 5-gallon bucket of water and lots of rags. Soak the rags and then ring them out real good, and then use those to "sand." Viola, no dust! Takes a little longer and you have to go slow to avoid making patterns in the mud, but the lack of mess is worth it. Once that dust starts getting everywhere, it'll be next to impossible to get out of things. If you don't wet sand with rags and sponges, move all furniture and WEAR MASKS AND EYE PROTECTION!

Good job bro! If you need any advice or anything, PM me and I'll give you my phone number.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 10:12:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Specop_007:

Originally Posted By OrARGB:
Finger off trigger and you need more screws in the field especially on the lid (ceiling). Good work though keep it up.



Fingers not on the trigger

Still finishing putting screws in. There'll be 4 per stud so it should be held up pretty good. I justwanted to get them up there so I could take the liftback.


Sorry about that..damn short fingers Thanks for getting your children interested in a life long hobby.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 10:13:37 AM EDT
If you are mudding and taping everythingyourself look at renting some stilts. It is SO much easier than moving the ladder every thirty seconds. Also texturing ceilings takes away a lot of the little errors.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 10:15:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By amk5222:
If you are mudding and taping everythingyourself look at renting some stilts. It is SO much easier than moving the ladder every thirty seconds. Also texturing ceilings takes away a lot of the little errors.



Yes, yes it does.

What kinda texture you gonna go with?
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