Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 12/28/2005 8:52:42 PM EDT
Is there any chance the BATF could find the PTRD as "sporting" and exempt it from the NFA so it can be imported, it's 14.5 millimeter Russian (The Russian equivalent of .50 Bmg....), and bolt action, breach loading, single shot, and looks like piece of pipe with a pistol grip on it, no other "evil" features besides the grip except MAYBE a threaded barrel, I'm not sure so it would seem to pass the 1989 "sporting test", and there are certainly larger bore non-NFA guns out there like the .700 Nitros for example....

As for the rifle it's 78.74 inches long, yes you read that right 78.74 inches, the barrel is 53.15 inches long and it weighs 38.40 pounds fires a 986 grain bullet at 3,280 feet per second yes thats 986 grains at 3,280 feet per second, it was origionaly desighed as an anti-tank rifle ammunition is about $30 bucks a pop....
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 9:09:29 PM EDT
A freind of a freind owns one. When he lets one loose, the whole range shuts up and stares at him for a little bit, then he lets another loose. LOUD is an understatement. Expensive to shoot also applies. Impractical is also applicable... Perhaps a 20mm Barrett would work better, in terms of being able to find parts and ammunition for it? Plus it's nicer

(in this category of firearms, I am ignoring price altogether, because of the shooting costs and utility of the gun just being where they are)
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 9:22:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/28/2005 9:26:26 PM EDT by JB69]


Russian 14.5 mm antitank rifle PTRD-1941



Wouldn't hold my breath........

eta: Interesting weapon though.... Pretty slick action, for a single shot rifle.

From here: www.rt66.com/~korteng/SmallArms/antitank.htm

The rifle itself, while it appeared to be simple, was actually quite an ingenious design and (according to Hogg and Weeks) probably owed something to the German PzB38. The barrel was allowed to recoil in the stock and, during this movement, the bolt rode on a cam which rotated and unlocked it. At the end of the recoil stroke, the bolt was held and the barrel moved back into battery, moving away from the bolt to open the breech and eject the spent case. A fresh round was then inserted and the bolt was manually closed. In some respects, this could be described as a "long recoil" system.

Link Posted: 12/28/2005 9:39:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 9245:
Is there any chance the BATF could find the PTRD as "sporting" and exempt it from the NFA so it can be imported, it's 14.5 millimeter Russian (The Russian equivalent of .50 Bmg....), and bolt action, breach loading, single shot, and looks like piece of pipe with a pistol grip on it, no other "evil" features besides the grip except MAYBE a threaded barrel, I'm not sure so it would seem to pass the 1989 "sporting test", and there are certainly larger bore non-NFA guns out there like the .700 Nitros for example....

As for the rifle it's 78.74 inches long, yes you read that right 78.74 inches, the barrel is 53.15 inches long and it weighs 38.40 pounds fires a 986 grain bullet at 3,280 feet per second yes thats 986 grains at 3,280 feet per second, it was origionaly desighed as an anti-tank rifle ammunition is about $30 bucks a pop....



Um, no.

Not to mention it comes from Russia.. The US-Russian Arms agreement would have to be amended as well.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 9:43:51 PM EDT
To get around the 14.5mm cartridge, it can be chambered for .50 BMG. That is what the US Army did during the Korean War to test .50 sniping, rebarreled it with a modified M2 barrel.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 9:44:34 PM EDT
14.5mm is not the russian equvalent of .50 bmg. their "equivalent" is a 12.7mm cartridge. 14.7 is definitely a destructive device and wont be imported.
Top Top