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Posted: 12/27/2005 9:56:50 PM EDT




www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20051227-010551-9078r

Communion wafers newest Quebec snack craze

MONTREAL, Dec. 27 (UPI) -- Unconsecrated communion wafers are growing in popularity as a snack food throughout Quebec, alongside potato chips and popcorn on supermarket shelves.

The paper-thin morsels made from flour and water hark back to when Quebec was one of the most devout Roman Catholic enclaves in North America and the wafers were seen only at holy communion.

Gaston Bonneau, one of the two major commercial producers in Quebec, told the Toronto Globe & Mail newspaper his business started with just himself and his wife in the mid-1980s. Now it's grown to 16 employees and he plans to automate production.

"My son can eat a whole bag while he's watching TV," said supermarket manager Paul Saumure. "He's had more of them outside of church than he ever did inside one."

As a sign of increasing secularism, Montreal churches are being refitted as condominiums and religious statuettes are being sold as home decor items in antique shops.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:05:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/27/2005 10:05:28 PM EDT by five2one]
They are tasty.

When I was a kid, I used to sneak into the church and chow down on communion wafers and the red wine used in mass. I particularly liked the big fat ones used by the priests when they say, "This is the body of Christ....".

Probably should go to confession about that.

I was bad when I was little.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:23:03 PM EDT
DEATH COOKIE!





j/k, Catholics.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:32:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Airwolf:




www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20051227-010551-9078r

Communion wafers newest Quebec snack craze

MONTREAL, Dec. 27 (UPI) -- Unconsecrated communion wafers are growing in popularity as a snack food throughout Quebec, alongside potato chips and popcorn on supermarket shelves.

The paper-thin morsels made from flour and water hark back to when Quebec was one of the most devout Roman Catholic enclaves in North America and the wafers were seen only at holy communion.

Gaston Bonneau, one of the two major commercial producers in Quebec, told the Toronto Globe & Mail newspaper his business started with just himself and his wife in the mid-1980s. Now it's grown to 16 employees and he plans to automate production.

"My son can eat a whole bag while he's watching TV," said supermarket manager Paul Saumure. "He's had more of them outside of church than he ever did inside one."

As a sign of increasing secularism, Montreal churches are being refitted as condominiums and religious statuettes are being sold as home decor items in antique shops.





Oy
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