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Posted: 12/27/2005 7:44:20 AM EDT
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10615986/

Alcohol can damage bones, new study shows

Bone loss potential climbs with heavy drinking; risk threshold not clear

Updated: 11:29 a.m. ET Dec. 27, 2005
NEW YORK - Bone loss is an often-overlooked consequence of heavy drinking, but recent research has illuminated how alcohol takes a toll on the bones, according to a new report.

In a review of cell, animal and human studies, Dr. Dennis A. Chakkalakal of the Omaha VA Medical Centre in Nebraska describes how heavy drinking leads to bone loss, higher risk of fractures and slower healing of bone breaks.

The main problem appears to be that alcohol inhibits the normal formation of new bone, Chakkalakal reports in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

Though excessive drinking has been shown to promote bone thinning and fractures, some studies have suggested that moderate drinking may actually help protect bone mass — possibly because small amounts of alcohol promote new bone formation.

The opposite appears true of high amounts of alcohol, according to Chakkalakal’s review.

Throughout adulthood, bone undergoes a process of “remodeling,” whereby cells called osteoclasts break down small portions of old bone, and cells called osteoblasts form new bone. In healthy, younger adults, this process is usually balanced, so that bone mass is maintained.

Too much alcohol, however, appears to inhibit osteoblasts from doing their job, and heavy drinkers may start to lose bone mass in just a few years, according to Chakkalakal. The potential for bone loss climbs in tandem with drinking, evidence shows, but it’s not clear where the risk threshold lies.

Most studies on alcohol and bone loss have defined “heavy” drinking as roughly six or more drinks per day. But, the review points out, there’s some evidence that bone loss is a risk for people who have closer to three or more drinks a day.

Though many people know about the damage heavy drinking can inflict on the liver, far fewer know about the effects on bone, according to Dr. Terrence M. Donohue Jr., also of the Omaha VA Medical Centre.

In a statement, he recommended that anyone with a bone fracture avoid alcohol during the healing process.

“The review,” he said, “underscores the importance of abstinence from alcohol consumption by patients — alcoholics or teetotalers — with fractures and who may want to drink during their convalescence.”

Link Posted: 12/27/2005 8:03:50 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 8:11:13 AM EDT
Right.....pot is MUCH better for you than booze.



Link Posted: 12/27/2005 8:14:47 AM EDT

...risk threshold not clear...


That's all I need to know. MJD
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 8:17:51 AM EDT
Just another article that proves alcohol in moderation is good for the body.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 8:24:21 AM EDT
I know for a fact that it can sometimes render THE bone useless.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 8:26:13 AM EDT
Well DUH!! when you go out every night and get hammered, eventually your luck will run out and you will fall and break something...
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 9:48:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By garandman:
Right.....pot is MUCH better for you than booze.






Yeah, I knew there would probably be someone come along who was seriously confused about what they were reading. Wrong thread (again). Try to keep up with the rest of the class, OK?
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 9:54:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bubblehead597:
Just another article that proves alcohol in moderation is good for the body.



I think it is interesting that it apparently has contradictory effects, depending on the dosage. One beer per night might help you stand straighter and stronger. (I will go along with the gag if you claim that it is for health reasons.) A six-pack per night might make you hump-backed. Most of what I have seen about health effects seems to argue that about two drinks per night is the limit of what seems to be healthful.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:38:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By wolfman97:

Originally Posted By garandman:
Right.....pot is MUCH better for you than booze.






Yeah, I knew there would probably be someone come along who was seriously confused about what they were reading. Wrong thread (again). Try to keep up with the rest of the class, OK?



Actually, I'm ahead of both the class and the teacher, as I know your motivation for posting this thread.

I'm not even being particularly prescient here. You've in the past stated that alcohol has more socially detrimental efects than pot.

Yer a known pot crusader.



Just makin' sire the noobs know.



Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:45:10 AM EDT
studies are fake. They just want grant money.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:47:46 AM EDT
Now I know why I haven't been able to get out of this friggin chair for the last eight months.

<­BR>



HONEY, CAN YOU PUT ANOTHER CASE OF BEER BESIDE ME............THANK YOU.

Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:48:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:
studies are fake. They just want grant money.

The mark of a good study is that the authors conclude that further study is necessary. Somebody's going to get a fellowship out of this.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:52:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By effinNewGuy:
I know for a fact that it can sometimes render THE bone useless.



Based on alcohol's impairment of judgment (ie making this a consideration for porkage), that could be a blessing...
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 10:56:53 AM EDT
anything in excess is going to have negative effects on the body.

I really need to find out how to get in on these studies though, getting paid to get drunk sounds like a good job.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 11:01:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By wolfman97:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10615986/

Alcohol can damage bones, new study shows

Bone loss potential climbs with heavy drinking; risk threshold not clear

Updated: 11:29 a.m. ET Dec. 27, 2005
NEW YORK - Bone loss is an often-overlooked consequence of heavy drinking, but recent research has illuminated how alcohol takes a toll on the bones, according to a new report.

In a review of cell, animal and human studies, Dr. Dennis A. Chakkalakal of the Omaha VA Medical Centre in Nebraska describes how heavy drinking leads to bone loss, higher risk of fractures and slower healing of bone breaks.

The main problem appears to be that alcohol inhibits the normal formation of new bone, Chakkalakal reports in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

Though excessive drinking has been shown to promote bone thinning and fractures, some studies have suggested that moderate drinking may actually help protect bone mass — possibly because small amounts of alcohol promote new bone formation.


The opposite appears true of high amounts of alcohol, according to Chakkalakal’s review.

Throughout adulthood, bone undergoes a process of “remodeling,” whereby cells called osteoclasts break down small portions of old bone, and cells called osteoblasts form new bone. In healthy, younger adults, this process is usually balanced, so that bone mass is maintained.

Too much alcohol, however, appears to inhibit osteoblasts from doing their job, and heavy drinkers may start to lose bone mass in just a few years, according to Chakkalakal. The potential for bone loss climbs in tandem with drinking, evidence shows, but it’s not clear where the risk threshold lies.

Most studies on alcohol and bone loss have defined “heavy” drinking as roughly six or more drinks per day. But, the review points out, there’s some evidence that bone loss is a risk for people who have closer to three or more drinks a day.

Though many people know about the damage heavy drinking can inflict on the liver, far fewer know about the effects on bone, according to Dr. Terrence M. Donohue Jr., also of the Omaha VA Medical Centre.

In a statement, he recommended that anyone with a bone fracture avoid alcohol during the healing process.

“The review,” he said, “underscores the importance of abstinence from alcohol consumption by patients — alcoholics or teetotalers — with fractures and who may want to drink during their convalescence.”





Not any obtuse statments in there AT ALL, it would appear....maybe....could have the potential....
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 11:04:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By phatmax:
Not any obtuse statments in there AT ALL, it would appear....maybe....could have the potential....

There may be some evidence of potential support for what could be your possible point, but further investigation might have a chance of estimating the likelihood of such potential.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 11:06:19 AM EDT
Alcohol damage bones?

Absolutely.

Broke my wrist while heavily intoxicated!
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 11:08:02 AM EDT
Doubletap
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 11:10:20 AM EDT
I heard it can damage your boner. You know, as in you can't get one.

And I have broken bones while drinking. I guess the research is true.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 11:11:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By phatmax:

Not any obtuse statments in there AT ALL, it would appear....maybe....could have the potential....




That might potentially and possibly put a dent in his factual scientific studies. Although the threshold of said possible alledge dent appears to be evasive.


Maybe.


Link Posted: 12/27/2005 11:17:07 AM EDT
Alcoholism is one of the lead cuprits for avascular necrosis of the hip - (Bo Jackson's hip sustained AVN)
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 2:10:05 PM EDT
Of all the problems associated with drinking too much, this one just adds to the mix.

Moderation in all vices is the way to go.
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