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Posted: 12/25/2005 4:05:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/25/2005 4:08:15 PM EDT by toddlerp]
I have had an opened bottle (capped of course) of White Distilled Vinegar in the cabinet for about 6 months. There is not an experiation date and there is no note of it needing refridgeration.

Is this still ediable? I need two tablespoons for my ham recipe.
Link Posted: 12/25/2005 4:13:10 PM EDT
It's vinegar. What's it gonna do... go sour?

honestly i don't know. But i've used vinegar that was years old.
Link Posted: 12/25/2005 4:20:06 PM EDT
Is it in a glass bottle and and is clear? If so it's fine. If it's in a plastic bottle that is all cloudy throw it out. The best vinegars are aged for 20+ years.
Link Posted: 12/25/2005 4:23:35 PM EDT
Plastic bottle and clear. Thanks.
Link Posted: 12/25/2005 4:33:39 PM EDT
From the Vinegar Institute (would you have believed it?)


How Long Does Vinegar Last?

The Vinegar Institute conducted studies to find out and confirmed that vinegar’s shelf life is almost indefinite. Because of its acid nature, vinegar is self-preserving and does not need refrigeration. White distilled vinegar will remain virtually unchanged over an extended period of time. And, while some changes can be observed in other types of vinegars, such as color changes or the development of a haze or sediment, this is only an aesthetic change. The product can still be used and enjoyed with confidence.

Link Posted: 12/25/2005 4:47:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_in_Seattle:
From the Vinegar Institute (would you have believed it?)


How Long Does Vinegar Last?

The Vinegar Institute conducted studies to find out and confirmed that vinegar’s shelf life is almost indefinite. Because of its acid nature, vinegar is self-preserving and does not need refrigeration. White distilled vinegar will remain virtually unchanged over an extended period of time. And, while some changes can be observed in other types of vinegars, such as color changes or the development of a haze or sediment, this is only an aesthetic change. The product can still be used and enjoyed with confidence.




That's true in a glass bottle. In a plastic bottle the friggin plastic starts to breakdown after about two years.
Link Posted: 12/25/2005 4:56:29 PM EDT
If you keep it too long....it turns to.....wine!
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