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Posted: 12/23/2005 6:31:31 PM EDT
I picked up this Turkish Mauser off a friend who needed some christmas cash, and didn't need the gun. I've shot it before and i love it.

But I noticed that it has some slight cracks right behind the action, and the bolts that seem to hold the receiver in place have moved back a few millimeters, most likely due to recoil.
The cracks don't seem too deep but I can't be 100% sure how deep they really are.
Is the gun safe to fire? What should I do?
Thanks in advance!







behind the trigger guard




notice how the bolt moved back a tiny bit?


Left side
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:32:56 PM EDT
the bolt getting moved back is not terribly uncommon on mausers that have been shot a lot(like most turks have) the tang split/repair I wouldnt worry too much about. though you could probably get a used stock for it for cheap on flebay or the EE.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:35:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
the bolt getting moved back is not terribly uncommon on mausers that have been shot a lot(like most turks have) the tang split/repair I wouldnt worry too much about. though you could probably get a used stock for it for cheap on flebay or the EE.




but it won't someday dramatically split, cut my hand in two and kill my dog, right?
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:41:31 PM EDT
This is common in military and some sporter Mausers if the stock isn't inletted enough behind the action.

I assume, since Turks were selling for like $50, that you didn't pay more than say $150 for this? I paid 100 for mine in similar condition.

You can never be sure when it will turn to toothpicks on you.

If I were you, this winter sometime, I would pull it out of the stock. Inlet with a dremel or scrapers a little bit around the back of the trigger guard and action where it has cracked. Enough so that when you put the gun back together, there is a gap, I would say 1/8th inch or more. Slather some poly or something on the raw wood to seal out moisture. That won't take long and will keep it from getting worse.

If you want to go the extra step, you could glass bed that part of the gun. Probably not neccesary, but it would be a good gun to learn on as you dont risk losing as much as you would on a new Remchester.

From what I've seen the Turks used very soft, pulpy wood and are more prone to these types of things.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:42:30 PM EDT
What are you using the rifle for?

Hunting? Get a new aftermarket stock. There are plenty out there.
Restoration? (other than why...it's a Turk.) They are fairly cheap to come by. If the action is in great shape, go to a fun show and look for a stock in better shape than that one.


WBK
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:51:05 PM EDT
Water-thin super glue works very well to fix cracks in a stock, especially if you can spread the crack a little to aloow the glue to wick further down into the wood. Then clamp the crack tighly shut and scape off the excess super glue when it dries. I had to do this on my CMP Garand a few months ago and it is still holding up after a 50 round service rifle clinic.

Hope this helps
John
Link Posted: 12/24/2005 7:11:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/28/2005 5:00:04 PM EDT by Lockedon]
bump, is the gun safe to continue firing like this??
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:00:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/28/2005 5:00:54 PM EDT by Lockedon]

Originally Posted By Lockedon:
bump, is the gun safe to continue firing like this??



btt
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:04:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jnmullin:
Water-thin super glue works very well to fix cracks in a stock, especially if you can spread the crack a little to aloow the glue to wick further down into the wood. Then clamp the crack tighly shut and scape off the excess super glue when it dries. I had to do this on my CMP Garand a few months ago and it is still holding up after a 50 round service rifle clinic.

Hope this helps
John





Use GORILLA GLUE for stock repairs.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:15:41 PM EDT
I've had two Turk stock crack on me.....had to replace one......with this one....
it translates out as "I get death"

Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:20:18 PM EDT
The stock will explode and shatter splinters into your face. You must obtain about 100 yds of copper wire and wrap the stock up tightly. Then top off with elmers glue. Just go ahead and paint the glue on. Wont hurt. Then place a board of wood between your face and the stock for extra safety. Turks arent the prettiest people because those damn stocks kept messing up their mugs.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:24:53 PM EDT
When confronted by an issue like this, until I can consult a reputable gunsmith to be sure, I ask myself:

Is the price of replacing this gun (Turk Mauser) or part (new stock) less than the cost of replacing my eyesight or my pretty face?

The answer always seem to be yes.

Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:31:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kingfish:
The stock will explode and shatter splinters into your face. You must obtain about 100 yds of copper wire and wrap the stock up tightly. Then top off with elmers glue. Just go ahead and paint the glue on. Wont hurt. Then place a board of wood between your face and the stock for extra safety. Turks arent the prettiest people because those damn stocks kept messing up their mugs.




Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:53:50 PM EDT
The easiest fix is to buy another stock off eBay.

The stock is cracked because the cross bolt is set back. It will continue to crack unless the cross bolt is repaired. To repair:
1. Remove the cross bolt.
2. Examine the wood being crushed by the cross bolt. If it is soft and oily, it will need to be removed until you get solid wood.
3. Clean the area with a degreaser like 111 trichloroethane, MEK or acetone to remove residual oil. It may take several applications.
4. Let the area dry.
5. Mix up some Brownells Acraglass or JB weld epoxy and pack the cross bolt hole, being sure to get the area aft of where the through bolt sits.
6. Re-install the throughbolt in it original (forwardmost) position. Make sure the through bolt is positioned so it will be square to the receiver shoulder. You'll get some squeeze-out of the epoxy. Clean it up with an acetone moistened Q-tip.
7. Examine the installation to make sure there is a good bubble-free glob of epoxy aft of the through bolt. Clean up any epoxy mess with the acetone moistened Q-tip.
8. Set the stock aside and let the epoxy cure.
9. Test fit and correct any inleting before finally reassembling the rifle.
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