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Posted: 12/19/2005 11:49:10 AM EDT
In the process of hiring someone and after they have had an interview with the company, do you expect them to call a week or so later and ask if the position is filled- so you know they are interested in the job?

Yeah, basically it is advice that I need.

Do you expect a thank you card?

Do either of these influence your decision in the hiring process?
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:51:57 AM EDT
Sending a thank you card NEVER hurts. Calling can hurt.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:52:06 AM EDT
I usually have my mind made up during the interview but I think it's great when they send me a card thanking me for the interview.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:55:08 AM EDT
A follow-up letter is always a good idea.

Thanks, I really liked ________ about your company, etc.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:57:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 12:08:39 PM EDT
Thank you cards/phone calls/ect don't influence my decision.

Once the interview process is over, I know whether or not you will be hired.

However, a coworker EXPECTS a thank you card and a phone call from anyone he interviews for his department.

Everyone is a bit different.

Av.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 12:12:09 PM EDT
If I want you I will be calling you back, I always find those calls are kinda annoying and a little too aggressive.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 12:48:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1911greg:
If I want you I will be calling you back, I always find those calls are kinda annoying and a little too aggressive.



__

+1. Corporate life has speeded up and is far more discriminating with an eye to the bottom-line than the 1970's "niceties".


Ed
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 8:45:47 PM EDT
In my many years of staffing and staffing support, I have run into several managers who were having decision issues being favorably impressed by a thank you note and that was the clincher. They can't hurt.

Follow-up calls are iffy, more than one can sour off people. As far as decision making time, I've seen managers take over a month, and once two months, then they can't understand why the candidate is gone. A few of the long ones they let the candidates know they would be out of town on a business trip and the decision was not going to be imminent.

All I know is that to keep calling after being told "we will call you" just pisses people off. Although most recruiters will tell you that a delaying hiring manager drives them nuttier than a persistent caller.

Recruiters will tell you if you were not selected, if you keep getting told we will call you it means they haven't made a decision yet.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 5:31:21 AM EDT
Any manager who makes a hiring decision based on who sent him a card, rather than job qualifications, is a fool.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 5:35:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2005 5:37:03 AM EDT by MTUSA]
If you have to send a thank you card to enhance your hiring chances,
you already blew it. I think the first 5 minutes seals the deal in interviews.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 5:38:42 AM EDT
I think a lot has to do with the position. For example, if you're looking for an agressive sales guys who's not afraid to put his foot in the door, then it could help. On the other hand, if it's a technical position, it could be considered annoying.

Just my $.02
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 6:35:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By wolfman97:
Any manager who makes a hiring decision based on who sent him a card, rather than job qualifications, is a fool.



I disagree. How you look on paper is not the only thing that counts. You could have someone with an awesome resume who has the potential to do an excellent job, but will in practice fail because they somehow cannot apply themselves to the job. A thank you note is a hint (not a guarantee, of course) that the interviewer is motivated to take this particular job.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 6:40:57 AM EDT
Nothing like trying to kiss a$$ even before you might get the job!

It doesn't matter to me. I find it a little agressive. Also, It's been done for so long by so many, that it has lost some of it's zing.......................................................
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 6:44:09 AM EDT
Neither helps, and a phone call directly to me would most likely be a negative.

It should have been told to you upon exit when they were making a decision and when they would be contacting you if they were interested.

If they aren't interested you will probably get a letter or email letting you know.

I know the waiting sucks, but don't bug them.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 7:25:15 AM EDT
Well crap. I should have posted this before I called the potential employer asking if they filled the position
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 7:27:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2005 7:28:50 AM EDT by Hokie]
First thing I do is check the applicant for headlice. Then for a pulse and the ability to count to five. If they pass, I move them into the 2nd tier of applicants, which requires a higher degree of qualifications.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 8:15:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2005 8:29:19 AM EDT by nightowl7]

Originally Posted By 1911greg:
If I want you I will be calling you back, I always find those calls are kinda annoying and a little too aggressive.



If you are fairly certain the company is actively hiring[ask] then by all means call back in fourty-eight to seventy-two hours if you have not recived a call-back to schedule an appointment for a interview or thank you correspondence through the mail.

Most potential employers will not mind you calling back and this also lets you know if they are still actively hiring or if the position you seek has been filled.

Sometimes in larger companies when you call-back they could have additional job openings available.

This also helps in the event another person is hired and the job does not work out for them.

This very well may keep your name fresh in the employers head if that be the case.

Some employers wait for call-backs as this demonstrates to them that the applicant is really wanting that position and is motivated enough to follow up on it.

Be aggressive but friendly.

Lee

Link Posted: 12/21/2005 8:23:19 AM EDT
Every job I had I was told I was hired at the end of the interview, right then and there.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 8:31:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2005 8:31:55 AM EDT by lordtrader]
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 8:35:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 8:35:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fizassist:

Originally Posted By wolfman97:
Any manager who makes a hiring decision based on who sent him a card, rather than job qualifications, is a fool.



I disagree. How you look on paper is not the only thing that counts. You could have someone with an awesome resume who has the potential to do an excellent job, but will in practice fail because they somehow cannot apply themselves to the job. A thank you note is a hint (not a guarantee, of course) that the interviewer is motivated to take this particular job.



Sounds like one of the least reliable indicators to me. Maybe the guy who didn't send you a card didn't do it because he was the active kind of guy who was always had something going. Maybe he is just an ordinary guy -- you know, the kind who can't remember to get his own wife a card on their anniversary.

I have done hiring myself. It was illuminating.

One resume that came in for a computer technical support rep was about fifty pages of the old fan fold paper (unburst, so it was still one long string of paper). We examined it and found it was a long list of DOS commands and utilities that the guy had had some contact with. It listed things like "Lotus 1-2-3 -- installed it, never worked with it." "DIR - extensive use" "DBASE - installed it, don't know what it is." There wasn't a word in there about any job he had.

We got lots of "resumes" that were hand-written. One, for an executive sales position dealing with upper income people, was hand-written with a felt tip marker on a page torn out of a steno pad. There were lots of people who claimed that they were experts in one particular software package but then couldn't spell the name correctly.

Most of the resumes that came in were just so bad that I really felt sorry for the people who sent them in. Obviously, there are huge numbers of people out there searching for work who are absolutely clueless.

I remember interviewing one young woman for a data entry clerk position. The job was entering medical claims. I asked her why she left her previous job.

"Because it was a lot of typing and that was boring," she said.

I shook my head in disbelief and asked her "Do you realize that, in this job, you would be typing all day long?"

"Yeah," she said. "But in my previous job I was typing letters, and that was boring."

"And you think typing medical claims is going to be interesting?" I asked.

"Yeah," she said.

And I only interviewed her because she had a decent-looking resume - typed, no misspellings and stuff.


Yeah, somebody sending in a thank-you card would have made all the difference.



Link Posted: 12/21/2005 8:50:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Headlice:
In the process of hiring someone and after they have had an interview with the company, do you expect them to call a week or so later and ask if the position is filled- so you know they are interested in the job?

Yeah, basically it is advice that I need.

Do you expect a thank you card?

Do either of these influence your decision in the hiring process?


After the interview, it is a good idea to send a thank you letter. Within the thank you letter, you should state that you are still interested in the position (if this is truly the case).
Sometimes, interviewers have a batch of applicants and multiple ones are worth hiring. Sending a letter is not only a formal thing to do but also lets the hiring personnel that you are interested in the job. It is somewhat of a formality in that the interviewers know who they want after the interview. But if you don't send the obligatory letter, there is sometimes the assumption the applicant doesn't care. And that's not good if you want the job.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 8:50:34 AM EDT
i called back 3 or 4 times for a job.to keep my name fresh in the mangers mind since it took me 3 months from first interview to finally getting hired.been there going on 10 years now.

if i was doing the hiring i rather have someone call and check on the postions or leave a message.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 10:32:26 AM EDT
Ok so thank-you letters it is. How long after the interview do I send one? It has been about a week- week and a half.....
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