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Posted: 12/19/2005 8:11:04 AM EDT

In our language the phrase is: "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin."

In english, it translates: " Delight with the flowing cheese curd."

This is a literal translation of a beautiful age old sentiment.

Is there a similar phrase in english? I want to impress my friends and family
this coming Yasus Kringles Day with my mastery of cross cultural sayings.

Veistinfhlng. (Thanking to you).
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:16:42 AM EDT
AND? Andorra?

I think we might need a bit more context to translate that one. I'm not sure there's anything like a direct equivalent.

NTM
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:21:47 AM EDT
"here's wishing your pie isn't too runny"
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:32:59 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:36:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By home_with_kids:
"here's wishing your pie isn't too runny"




Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:43:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:50:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
I think we might need a bit more context to translate that one.



+1. What are some example situations where this might be used...?
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:50:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
AND? Andorra?

I think we might need a bit more context to translate that one. I'm not sure there's anything like a direct equivalent.

NTM



Perhaps the most famous context here is the annual "Shveprditer Gahstir". It is four days
in February when we ski with the sheep. In our country, skiing is a national passtime.
Our biggest livestocking is sheep herding. People come to try their hand at skiing with a sheep over their shoulder, a lamb under each arm, and other fun activities. Perhaps this is the context you mean?

Or maybe, it is our national lottery of which you speak? It, too is a big context that is drawn
for twice a year. It is paid in Euros today. It used to be paid in contraband; after all, we are known as
a "smugglers' paradise".

Veistinfhlng. (Thanking to you)
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:55:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 8:58:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:00:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By home_with_kids:
"here's wishing your pie isn't too runny"


I like pie? vis-a-vis "I like cheese"?
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:00:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2005 9:12:49 AM EDT by Fat_McNasty]

Originally Posted By Londo:
People come to try their hand at skiing with a sheep over their shoulder, a lamb under each arm, and other fun activities.



I hear that 1Gunrunner does this on occasion! Actually this sounds like your standard WA state weekend!
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:06:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Londo:
In our language the phrase is: "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin."

In english, it translates: " Delight with the flowing cheese curd."

This is a literal translation of a beautiful age old sentiment.

Is there a similar phrase in english? I want to impress my friends and family
this coming Yasus Kringles Day with my mastery of cross cultural sayings.

Veistinfhlng. (Thanking to you).



Say what?

Is this a Germanic language? If so, which one? Not like any I've ever seen...




Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:08:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2005 9:10:03 AM EDT by 95thFoot]

Originally Posted By sherrick13:
21 people live in Andorra and we have one here. Who would have thunk it?



And do you know which languages they speak in Andorra?

Catalán (official), French, Castilian, Portuguese.



"Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin."
comes from none of them.


Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:11:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Londo:

Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
AND? Andorra?

I think we might need a bit more context to translate that one. I'm not sure there's anything like a direct equivalent.

NTM



Perhaps the most famous context here is the annual "Shveprditer Gahstir". It is four days
in February when we ski with the sheep. In our country, skiing is a national passtime.
Our biggest livestocking is sheep herding. People come to try their hand at skiing with a sheep over their shoulder, a lamb under each arm, and other fun activities. Perhaps this is the context you mean?

Or maybe, it is our national lottery of which you speak? It, too is a big context that is drawn
for twice a year. It is paid in Euros today. It used to be paid in contraband; after all, we are known as
a "smugglers' paradise".

Veistinfhlng. (Thanking to you)



In what circumstance would you say "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin?" Is it good or bad? Is it congratulations or ridicule? Would you use it if your friend just had sex with a pretty girl? Would you use it if your friend just got hit with by a car?
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:16:55 AM EDT
Keep your nose to the wind and your tail to yourself. And, when in doubt: Post Pics!

Happy Kwanzaa!
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:43:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fizassist:
Originally Posted By Londo:
Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
AND? Andorra?



In what circumstance would you say "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin?" Is it good or bad? Is it congratulations or ridicule? Would you use it if your friend just had sex with a pretty girl? Would you use it if your friend just got hit with by a car?




I now understand when you say context. I was thinking the games we play.

We would use "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin" when we tell people not to be overly concerned
about large issues; rather to enjoy the small bounties. Flowing cheese curd might be similar to the
english phrase, "The little things are that count" or a saying like that. I am looking for a close
sentiment to share on Yasus Kringles Day when we toast to the Festivus annium and to the darkness
about to settle on our valley. It is on this day we share our concerns with each other and engage in
feats of strength. Our's is an ancient and tradition-steeped holiday, dating back to pre- druidic influences.

Veistinfhlng. (Thanking to you)
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:44:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 9:45:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Londo:

Originally Posted By fizassist:
Originally Posted By Londo:
Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
AND? Andorra?



In what circumstance would you say "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin?" Is it good or bad? Is it congratulations or ridicule? Would you use it if your friend just had sex with a pretty girl? Would you use it if your friend just got hit with by a car?




I now understand when you say context. I was thinking the games we play.

We would use "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin" when we tell people not to be overly concerned
about large issues; rather to enjoy the small bounties. Flowing cheese curd might be similar to the
english phrase, "The little things are that count" or a saying like that. I am looking for a close
sentiment to share on Yasus Kringles Day when we toast to the Festivus annium and to the darkness
about to settle on our valley. It is on this day we share our concerns with each other and engage in
feats of strength. Our's is an ancient and tradition-steeped holiday, dating back to pre- druidic influences.

Veistinfhlng. (Thanking to you)


Hmmm where have I heard that before?

OH yeah!
SEINFELD
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 10:03:17 AM EDT
In that case, try:

"Take time to smell the roses." (Allow yourself time to enjoy the small beauties in life.)

I think that's about as close as it gets.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 10:53:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By sWs2:

Originally Posted By Londo:

Originally Posted By fizassist:
Originally Posted By Londo:
Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
AND? Andorra?

In what circumstance would you say "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin?" Is it good or bad? Is it congratulations or ridicule? Would you use it if your friend just had sex with a pretty girl? Would you use it if your friend just got hit with by a car?



I now understand when you say context. I was thinking the games we play.

We would use "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin" when we tell people not to be overly concerned
about large issues; rather to enjoy the small bounties. Flowing cheese curd might be similar to the
english phrase, "The little things are that count" or a saying like that. I am looking for a close
sentiment to share on Yasus Kringles Day when we toast to the Festivus annium and to the darkness
about to settle on our valley. It is on this day we share our concerns with each other and engage in
feats of strength. Our's is an ancient and tradition-steeped holiday, dating back to pre- druidic influences.

Veistinfhlng. (Thanking to you)


Hmmm where have I heard that before?

OH yeah!
SEINFELD


I was going to guess "Perfect Strangers".

Balki! Balki Bartokomous!

"Don't be ridi-cool-us."

"Momma told me never to do the dance of joy alone, or I would go blind."

"Your ship has finally hit the fan!"

link1

link2
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:13:29 AM EDT
omg tag for after work. I'm 'ing in my cube.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:19:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2005 11:19:53 AM EDT by ByteTheBullet]
"Don't sweat the petty things and never pet the sweaty things"


ByteTheBullet (-:
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:24:54 AM EDT
I'm trying to remember the corresponding phrase we use in our country in conjunction with cat juggling.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:26:56 AM EDT
I call BS. That is no language I know of, not even Basque or Hungarian, and I know of a hell of a lot of languages, and can identify most of them (although I usually can't read them). In Andorra the only ethnic groups I know of (and AND is the ISO 3116-1 alpha-3 code for Andorra) are the Catalan-speakers, the Spanish-speakers, the French-speakers, and a very few Portugese-speakers. Maybe a couple Basque, but I doubt it.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:34:59 AM EDT
I'm inclined to agree... Given the name Londo, could it be a language from Babylon 5?

NTM
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:48:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
I'm trying to remember the corresponding phrase we use in our country in conjunction with cat juggling.



"On Mars, we smoke cornsilk."


Link Posted: 12/19/2005 11:49:49 AM EDT
No soup for Londo!
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 12:22:06 PM EDT
Attending social events with sheep is generally frowned upon in the US.

Thus there is no direct translation.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 12:38:59 PM EDT
This has become interesting to me, Londo.

Some of you have expressed questions about my language.
It is, to many outside my region, almost forgotten.

Although I think you will agree my english is adequate for general
converse, my native language is a very localized Basque dialect.

My language is both old and new. It was widely used until it was banned
during our war. Today, we have resurrected it in seven dialects.

I speak and write an even older variation of the sixth dialect; with elements
of the "lost" eighth dialect. I do that sparingly since so few people recognize,
let alone know it. I do it out of respect to my culture.

That is why I posited the question about the flowing cheese curd.

My children, twins, will soon go to one of our few language ikastolas the Euskaltzaindia
in Onate. There, they will learn Basque (Euskara Batua).

Veistinfhlng extxetik tras exerantz. (Thanking to you from my home to your home)

Link Posted: 12/19/2005 12:47:25 PM EDT
"don't cry over spilled milk"?

i really have no idea what is going on in this tread.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 12:49:46 PM EDT
Last January, when you shot the white coyote, and lived in Virginia, your English was much more refined.

I have other examples of your command of the American English language.

However, be that as it may, your sense of humor is excellent, and I do love your expession about the cheese balls.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 1:43:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2005 1:52:06 PM EDT by Londo]
A career in foreign service requires one to live in many places;
including the glorious Commonwealth of Virginia, which is near
the District of Columbia. Alas, my english has declined since leaving
your great country.


I shall retire for the night as it is very late here.
Sleep does not come easy to my village. 'Tis the season
of cattle lowing.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 1:56:37 PM EDT
At times like this I am reminded of the charming Taiwanese Engrish phrase, "don't think too much."
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 2:03:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2005 2:05:15 PM EDT by ALPHAGHOST]
"F---"

universal language (or so i was told)

Link Posted: 12/19/2005 2:07:07 PM EDT
<Ron Burgandy> When in Rome...</Ron Burgandy>
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 2:16:19 PM EDT
(Forrest Gump) "Life is like a mouth full of shit.... If you just keep chewin', sooner or later you'll come to some crunchy parts" (/Forrest Gump)

Link Posted: 12/19/2005 2:23:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 95thFoot:

Originally Posted By sherrick13:
21 people live in Andorra and we have one here. Who would have thunk it?



And do you know which languages they speak in Andorra?

Catalán (official), French, Castilian, Portuguese.



"Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin."
comes from none of them.




+1

I smell
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 2:25:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Londo:
My language is both old and new. It was widely used until it was banned
during our war. Today, we have resurrected it in seven dialects.


Which war, if I may ask?
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 3:04:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SWO_daddy:

Originally Posted By Londo:
My language is both old and new. It was widely used until it was banned
during our war. Today, we have resurrected it in seven dialects.


Which war, if I may ask?



Basque Separatist movement?
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 3:16:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
I'm trying to remember the corresponding phrase we use in our country in conjunction with cat juggling.


You're from Mexico?
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 6:28:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Londo:
<snip>
Sleep does not come easy to my village. 'Tis the season
of cattle lowing.


I smell sigline! I call shotgun!
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 6:31:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/20/2005 6:32:20 AM EDT by wise_jake]
done!
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 8:14:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Nefarius:
(Forrest Gump) "Life is like a mouth full of shit.... If you just keep chewin', sooner or later you'll come to some crunchy parts" (/Forrest Gump)



I seriously LOL'd on that one.
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 8:25:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Nefarius:
(Forrest Gump) "Life is like a mouth full of shit.... If you just keep chewin', sooner or later you'll come to some crunchy parts" (/Forrest Gump)






That is by far the funniest thing I have heard for quite a while!
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 8:29:14 AM EDT
use this to confuse your fellow Andorrans:

"keep your timber limber and don't let your meat loaf"

(translation: watch yer cornhole, bud)


Link Posted: 12/20/2005 8:55:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
use this to confuse your fellow Andorrans:

"keep your timber limber and don't let your meat loaf"

(translation: watch yer cornhole, bud)


Buddy of mine is like the Mexican Pauly Shore. He always used to say, in parting:

"Hang loose, reproduce, and don't let your meat loaf."
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 8:56:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Nefarius:
(Forrest Gump) "Life is like a mouth full of shit.... If you just keep chewin', sooner or later you'll come to some crunchy parts" (/Forrest Gump)




omg.

Thats fuckin hilarious!
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 4:03:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By wise_jake:

Originally Posted By Londo:
<snip>
Sleep does not come easy to my village. 'Tis the season
of cattle lowing.


I smell sigline! I call shotgun!



Your screen name is truly accurate wise_jake.

In our culture, cattle become restless every year at this time.
We have woven it into our folklore. Tradition says lowing cattle
fore tell important events.

Thank you, for honoring our culture through your preservation of
this important fact.

Veistinfhlng megaliah an etiahiam. (Thanking to you in this season)
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 4:38:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Londo:

Originally Posted By wise_jake:

Originally Posted By Londo:
<snip>
Sleep does not come easy to my village. 'Tis the season
of cattle lowing.


I smell sigline! I call shotgun!



Your screen name is truly accurate wise_jake.

In our culture, cattle become restless every year at this time.
We have woven it into our folklore. Tradition says lowing cattle
fore tell important events.

Thank you, for honoring our culture through your preservation of
this important fact.

Veistinfhlng megaliah an etiahiam. (Thanking to you in this season)


This has to be one of the best I've seen in a long while.
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 4:44:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/20/2005 4:46:44 PM EDT by WinstonSmith]

Originally Posted By Londo:

Originally Posted By fizassist:
Originally Posted By Londo:
Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
AND? Andorra?



In what circumstance would you say "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin?" Is it good or bad? Is it congratulations or ridicule? Would you use it if your friend just had sex with a pretty girl? Would you use it if your friend just got hit with by a car?




I now understand when you say context. I was thinking the games we play.

We would use "Driestener huillie estefier hjkleuftin" when we tell people not to be overly concerned
about large issues; rather to enjoy the small bounties. Flowing cheese curd might be similar to the
english phrase, "The little things are that count" or a saying like that. I am looking for a close
sentiment to share on Yasus Kringles Day when we toast to the Festivus annium and to the darkness
about to settle on our valley. It is on this day we share our concerns with each other and engage in
feats of strength. Our's is an ancient and tradition-steeped holiday, dating back to pre- druidic influences.

Veistinfhlng. (Thanking to you)



In this context, I think perhaps the best match would be, "Don't sweat the petty stuff, and don't pet the sweaty stuff".

ETA- Beat to the ounch over a page ago by ByteTheBullet.. Either great minds that think alike or fools that never differ.
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