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Posted: 12/18/2005 9:11:40 PM EDT
What temperature range can a Siberian Husky safely handle?
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:30:16 PM EDT
Anyone?
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:45:20 PM EDT
I have owned 4 over the years. .What exactly do you mean ,by what temperature can they handle.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:48:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/18/2005 9:49:13 PM EDT by MoparMike]
Depends on what kind of shelter he has. We had a Siberian Spitz (something like that, he was AKC, 2ft high at the shoulder, 50lbs or so, long fur) that we brought in to the insulated house-attached utility room when it got below 20*F. He probably could have standed it longer, as he never went in his house with the lightbulb, instead prefering the open part of the shed just so the snow wouldn't fall on him.

In retrospect, that probably didnt help much. But I imagine that anything over 0*F with a plain ole' doghouse/straw combo will be plenty fine. After all, they do sleep in packs in SIBERIA, where it gets a tad cool in the winter.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:51:01 PM EDT
If you think it is cold bring him in. I know they could handle it but it sucks to be out there.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:54:02 PM EDT
Huskies are built to handle very cold weather, but they also need to adjust to it.

Throw a dog used to a warm environment into -20 weather, and it won't be able to handle it....even a Husky. Their coats adjust to the typical weather they live in.

If you can't go out without extreme cold weather gear for an hour's stay outside because it's too cold, then don't let your dog, no matter the breed, stay out in that temperature without warmth, water and protection from wind.

Common sense.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:56:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
If you think it is cold bring him in. I know they could handle it but it sucks to be out there.



He needs to define if he means just sleeping out in the yard or having a dog house that is not to large with( plenty) of straw covering the floor and also pushed up on the sides of the walls.
If he has a setup like that subzero is no problem for a healthy one
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 10:44:56 PM EDT
not certain, a lot would seem to do with how much a dog is accustomed to the cold to start with.
Sled dogs in the artic are buried in the snow at night, they curl up and the mushers shovel snow on them and pack them down and they seel well. But those dogs are obviously in that cold all the time.
I wouldn't just put a dog that's used to inside out, but it should have the potential to handle really cold weather.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 10:48:22 PM EDT
My dogs are stupid,they will lay outside the kennel in freezing rain when they have shelter to protect them, but i dont leave them out there any longer than i have to.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 10:51:01 PM EDT
Its not my dog... Mine is inside... Its my neighbors, she is out all the time, its about 20 or so here..
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 4:08:10 AM EDT
Read some stories about sled dogs in the far noth. As long as they are used to it, they can walk around comfortably with icicles hanging off of them in temperatures of 40 below.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 4:25:06 AM EDT
The dog needs to have a proper sized dog house and food/water, if he doesnt all bets are off.

If the husky is in good health, has the right dog house not too big, not too small with some hay as bedding material he should be fine in the 20 deg range.
This is for a dog that lives outside year round, if he's an inside outside dog its just like me or you being outside with a jacket on, too cold.

If he is not being taken care of speak with the owner and advise them, if nothing happens call Animal control. Some people are just stupid and need a thump on the head before they wise up.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 4:30:17 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 6:40:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By u-baddog:
The dog needs to have a proper sized dog house and food/water, if he doesnt all bets are off.

If the husky is in good health, has the right dog house not too big, not too small with some hay as bedding material he should be fine in the 20 deg range.
This is for a dog that lives outside year round, if he's an inside outside dog its just like me or you being outside with a jacket on, too cold.

If he is not being taken care of speak with the owner and advise them, if nothing happens call Animal control. Some people are just stupid and need a thump on the head before they wise up.



Ive calledthem numerous times... Nothing, Dog has a house she cant even get in, no bedding, no food frozen water...Humane society wont help...
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 6:42:28 AM EDT
Rescue the dog.

Shoot the owner.

Link Posted: 12/19/2005 7:06:55 AM EDT
Here is the deal on animal's coats. An animal starts growing a winter coat based on the amount (hours) of daylight during a day. Hence, the farther north, the less daylight you have. It is not based on the temps outside. If you want to shed your dog off, put him in a house with a light bulb on all the time. His body thinks the sun is out, and the hair will slip. It works with horses, that's how they get those slick summer looking coats in the middle of the winter. It is also how you end up with a sick show horse.

Dogs don't feel cold the same way that humans feel cold. Dogs don't have the vaso-constriction muscles like us. They don't get cold feet, or cold ears. When they get cold, they get cold all over. If a dog has adequate protection, from cold winds, adequate food and water, and a place to run. There is no reason why a dog can't stay outside during the winter. You will probably find that a dog that winters outside to be healthier than a dog that stays inside all the time.
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 7:14:33 AM EDT
My dog can only stand one tempeture, that ROOM temp!
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 7:18:54 AM EDT
My 2 year old Husky stays outside during the day unless it is raining and comes inside the attached garage at night. She has a 10' cage that takes up the whole garage bay and that is her night time quarters. I have put blankets down for her to sleep on and the next day I find the blankets in 1,000 pieces. She prefers the cool cement floor

I cannot let this 90 pound nut job in the house, although I wish I could. This dog has ADD without a doubt I have no doubt she would be fine outside because she is happiest when it is snowing. She was laying down sleeping on the snow this past weekend when she could have easily reached warmer grassy areas where the snow had melted.
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