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Posted: 12/18/2005 2:55:11 PM EDT
there wasa post a while ago with everyone's gear BoB pictures, where can I find it?
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:56:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:38:24 PM EDT
thankyou muchly
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:43:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/18/2005 3:49:54 PM EDT by SubnetMask]
I don't know, but I'll start a new one!

I posted this a while back (it's in the archive), and I figure now is as good a time as any to repost it:



OK, apparently I had nothing better to do tonight, so I took a bunch of pictures. You'll see all of my gear, and how I pack it. This is a total gear porn post.

Not all of my food is shown, because I need to replenish the stock. I got hungry a while back and hadn't gone to the grocery store, so....

Oh, one note on the clothing: I would typically be wearing some of it (I don't go backpacking in jeans and a t-shirt) but I went ahead and took pictures of everything and packed it. Keep this in mind when considering the total weight of my pack (27lbs, according to the scale, BTW). This is more clothing than would normally be in my pack (depending on weather), and less food. That 27lb figure includes about a liter of water, as well. Everything I purchased was researched VERY extensively and has been modified over the years with experience. For me, weight is CRITICAL. I evaluate how much something weighs before I consider anything else. It all adds up. A light load allows me to hike MUCH farther than most everybody else, and with far less fatigue. A light pack reduces your chance of injury and negates the need for heavy-duty boots. I go backpacking in trail runners. If nothing else, a light pack allows you to enjoy yourself more. Ever been trudging along all day with a 60 pound pack - tired as hell - and been passed by a cocky, smiling ex-Californian wierdo freak?

OK, here we go:


Here is EVERYTHING that goes into my pack. It's almost hard to believe that all of this crap fits in that pack you see in the picture (next to the Marmot bag)


Here are the clothes. I like packable clothing. The grey looking item on the left is my rain jacket (which is suprisingly warm, btw), the black item is my Marmott fleece middle layer, the white mesh item on the bottom right are my marmott rain pants, and the brown mesh item are my pants. The rest of the stuff are Mountain Hardwear shirts, undies, socks, sock liners, a Pantagonia turtle neck first layer, and a pair of Mountain Hardwear long johns. Believe it or not, I've backpacked in 20 deg weather with this stuff (gloves and ski-mask not shown). Maybe I'm warm blooded.




Here's the clothing pictured above in a stuff-sack. I stuff everything (except for the fleece) before it goes into my pack.




Here's my Thermarest pack towel and a rain cover for my pack. That pack towel is REALLY cool. It's extremely absorbant, and just plain handy. You can squeeze almost all of the water out of it, and it dries pretty quickly.




Remember the red Thermarest in the first picture? I love that thing. It's amazing how much warmer you are when you're not sleeping on the cold ground. It's pretty comfy, too. I have the 3/4 length GuideLite model. It saves weight, and I don't really need to have a pad under my calves and feet. They have full length and thicker ones, but for my purposes they weigh too much (it all adds up). I DO allow myself one luxury, and that's a Thermarest Easy Chair. This thing rocks. You basically fold your Thermarest in half and convert it to a chair. Here's an action shot of me vegging in front of the boob-tube




When it comes time to pack, I open the valve on the Thermarest and roll it up TIGHT. I then wrap the Easy Chair around it, as shown:




Everything then fits nicely into a stuff sack originally intended to hold the Thermarest ONLY (neat, huh?)




Here's my bag. This is one of my favorite pieces of gear, and in my opinion one of the finest bags money can buy, hands down. It's 900-fill (!!!) goose down and VERY light. It weighs a mere 1lb, 5oz and has kept me warm down to 20deg, though it's officially rated at 30. Goose down is the shiznit. You have to be very carefull not to get it wet, or it loses all of it's loft and insulating ability. Just look at how much loft this thing has! Wait till you see how compressible it is. It's mind boggling.




Here is the bag, in it's stuff sack. I once got it in a 1 liter Nalgene bottle, but it was a pain in the ass to get out (I was just showing off). I'm amazed every time I stuff this thing that it fits in the stuff sack.



Here's the water filter, bladder, and stuff sack. The filter is an MSR WaterWorks, and is a ceramic filter. It's good down to .2 micron, and can filter about a liter a minute with very little effort. It's designed to screw onto the top of a nalgene bottle, and it even fits on my bladder. Cool.




Here we see the filter attached to the bladder.




Preparing to pack - the bladder is full of water and the filter is in it's stuff sack.




Here is everything a guy needs to eat. Pictured are Snow Peak titanium cookware, a titanium coffee mug, lid, fuel canisters, titanium stove, wind shield, coffee filter (throw some grounds in it and put in in your cup), some food and coffee, a sog knife, and a fork. I repackage my food (typically jerky and Mountain House freeze dried stuff) into ziplock bags to save space. This is only enough food for maybe a day and a half. I could probably stretch myself two days before I kill somebody due to massive hunger.




In the next few pictures, I'll show you how I pack my cookwear. First, I unscrew the stove, fold it, and toss it in the coffee cup:



Next, I throw the coffee cup into my pot:




Then, I place the smaller pot on top along with the lid:




After that, it all fits nice into a stuff sack:




Here's some misc items. We've got a Magellan Sport Trak Pro GPS, a waterproof (and light) LED flashlight, a compass, some rope (I usually hang food with it), a repair kit I've never used, a carabiner, insect repelent, waterproof matches (orange container), some TP (I don't use much), a customized first aid kit (contents listed in post above) and a Nalgene bottle.



I didn't really feel like setting up my tent, so here's a picture of the tent taken at Sword Lake, CA in the Carson Iceburg Wilderness. It'll technically fit two, but you'd better REALLY love each other! It's about 6 feet long in addition to the vestibule for your gear. It's a single wall tent, so condensation can be an issue. The solution is to zip open the small vents near the bottom where your head ends up. This does a pretty good job of keeping the moisture off the inside walls. Double wall tents are nicer, but this one is pretty stinkin' light at 3lbs including stakes and poles.


Now, I'm ready to start stuffing everything into my pack. This is almost an art in and of itself. The first item I throw in is the tent. I stuff this thing in it's sack the same way I do my sleeping bag. Folding it the same way every time cracks the UV coating. Besides, it way faster to cram it into a sack. Who really cares if the tent gets wrinkeld? I sure as hell don't. Here, the tent goes lengthwise in the bottom of the pack:




Next, the Thermarest/Easy Chair sack goes in. I push it all the way to the bottom of the pack, so that it's not resting on top of the tent.




Next, I shove the sleeping bag in. It sits on top of the tent.




Next, the tent poles get squeezed into a small crack and go all the way to the bottom of the pack:




Now the food is crammed into a stuff sack and placed on top of the sleeping bag:




Now we cram the cook set in there:




Toss in some fuel canisters:



Add the water filter:




Cram the clothes in (normally a smaller sack):




Now we put the water bladder on top. Note the hose coming out of the pack:




My Nalgene bottle goes in a side pocket:




My compass, flashlight and GPS go in the opposite side pocket:




See all of this stuff? It goes in the bag that snaps onto the top of my pack. Most of this is stuff I get to frequently while hiking. It's also convienent to toss it in the bag:




It does actually fit, believe it or not:




Next the bag is snapped onto the top of the pack, and we're all set.




That's all there is to it. We're ready to roll. I hope you enjoyed this most gear-pornagraphic post. As always, comments and suggestions are welcome.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:53:18 PM EDT
Do you have any pictures!

JK, good post, thanks for sharing
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:54:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
I don't know, but I'll start a new one!




I see no guns. Therefore its not complete.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:55:16 PM EDT
think interceptor vest with some crap on it and then some guns.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:55:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
I don't know, but I'll start a new one!




I see no guns. Therefore its not complete.

+1 Where do you stick ammo and magazines?
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:56:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
I don't know, but I'll start a new one!




I see no guns. Therefore its not complete.

+1 Where do you stick ammo and magazines?



God damn you guys!
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:59:43 PM EDT
Nice gear and all,but if I had a hair cut and you added about 4" to your gut we would be twins
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 4:01:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By colklink:
Nice gear and all,but if I had a hair cut and you added about 4" to your gut we would be twins



The holiday season ain't over yet, and I could probably use a hair cut.

They say everybody has a twin...
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 4:03:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By colklink:
Nice gear and all,but if I had a hair cut and you added about 4" to your gut we would be twins



The holiday season ain't over yet, and I could probably use a hair cut.

They say everybody has a twin...

Nice phone BTW.

Link Posted: 12/18/2005 4:06:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By colklink:
Nice gear and all,but if I had a hair cut and you added about 4" to your gut we would be twins



The holiday season ain't over yet, and I could probably use a hair cut.

They say everybody has a twin...



Do you have the problem of all the hot chicks in your town hitting on you constantly?





Me neither
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 10:13:24 PM EDT
Nice gear! We have some of the same stuff! I liked you demonstration of how to pack it all in, I can never seem to get my load balanced right. I just got a brunson raptor stove, it works great! My tent I use when I hike with a partner is a mountain hardware lightwedge 2. It's too heavy for one, I got a walrus microswift that I thought would be a good solo tent but it was a bitch getting in and out, I now have a peak one cobra as my solo tent.

I've been experimenting with homemade alcohol stoves lately, just for fun. It's not very cold where I camp and hike so I don't have to take warm clothes but I always seem to take too much stuff, clothing is the area where I mess up on the most. I sleep cold but my warmer bag is really too hot for this area so I bring my small bag and more clothes. I have a gregory shasta pack and also a deuter futura 45, not the lightest stuff.

I'm going to cumberland island national seashore middle of january, should be fun. I just got a digital camera and was going to post a backpacking meal as my first dinner pic. I'll have to take it in my backyard to meet the gun requirment though.

Again, thanks for the cool post and all the pics!
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 10:15:52 PM EDT
Nice stuff.

Can i borrow it?

Link Posted: 12/18/2005 10:39:06 PM EDT
Just a suggestion. Why 2 canisters of fuel? You should get several days out of each, but you only have food for 1.5 days and have a reliable water filter so you won't have to boil.. Just a thought.

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