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Posted: 6/26/2001 9:13:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 9:17:17 PM EDT
Sorry to hear it man. I wish I had some good advice, but all I can give you is my wishes for it to turn out the best for you. Aviator [img]www.dredgeearthfirst.com/aviator.gif[/img]
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 9:19:42 PM EDT
If you dont make it an issue then she cant either, just go along with the no gun deal, he is a little too young anyway, in a couple of years after the divorce you can introduce him to the wonderful world of firearms. For now play it cool. Good luck in the divorce!
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 9:20:05 PM EDT
Any way you can get her to come to her senses??? Its obvious she is using this to provoke you.Maybe keep you from your son. How bad was/is the relationship? Are you still civil with each other and can you maybe talk to her about it?? Sorry,best I can do, relationships are'nt my thing.
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 9:27:52 PM EDT
Dude! Keep your cool on this one! NON-ISSUE. Get the hell outta this with your sanity and gunsafe intact, at (almost) any cost. You want to see the kid in the future with no problems, so, let this ride like you know something she doesn't...which you do! Besides, who else will be able to teach him that metric mags fit inch rifles, but, not vice-a-versa?!! Hmmmm? Good Luck, bro!
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 9:46:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/26/2001 9:44:36 PM EDT by Q-Man]
I grew up with very little exposure to guns. I didn't get negative exposure, but I only got to go shooting a few times. As long as your son isn't being told that guns are bad, I think you should concentrate on bigger problems, like your soon to be ex-wife trying to screw you over.
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 9:50:01 PM EDT
As already stated, this is an issue for "after the divorce." You can't possibly win right now. Finalize the divorce with acceptable custody arrangements and teach him about guns later when he is older and interested. But the most valuable thing I can tell you is this: Do only what is in the best interest of your child, even at your expense. One day he will be older and probably think she is kinda a bitch for acting this way and for her probable future actions. He will then see what you did. And ALL WILL BE RIGHT WITH THE WORLD.
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 10:09:55 PM EDT
Boland, you're not the only one dealing with this issue . We're just separated and not sure where it will go from there. I parked all of my guns 'n gear at a friend's place a few weeks ago and got a signed and dated receipt. That way, my stuff can't disappear and I've got solid proof that I'm going out of my way to keep a safe and healthy environment. I won't see the stuff again until this is all settled, one way or another. (I wonder if I could sue her if I get mugged and can't defend myself...) Just a couple of days before I relocated my guns, I took my two older boys (11 and 13) out shooting. They enjoy it a lot, and we had a great time together. They don't even complain about the non-stop "four laws" lecture! BusMaster and SteyrAUG are totally right on this. Your primary objective is keeping contact with your son. Secondary goal is trying to arrange the best possible situation for yourself to rebuild after the divorce. The more uptight she is, or the more she can criticize you in court, the worse off you'll be on both counts. Get through this mess the best you can, and wait for the dust to settle. You'll have plenty of time to teach your son what he needs to know, about lots more than guns. Best wishes to you, (dis)ArmedPatriot
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 10:24:55 PM EDT
sounds like you should of Smacked her on the Ass a long time ago
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 10:57:45 PM EDT
My take This would be my priority of thoughts: 1) Son's future interests; 2) Your visitation interests; 3) Your wife's interest in 1/2 of weapons or accessories you purchased with earnings during marriage. (you live in CA, a community property state, so she owns half and can force a sale of such guns if she wishes to (i.e. if she is smart--or gets a smart nazi family lawyer to advise her to say she wants to go shooting and own 'weapons' or that the value of the items is elusive or "indeterminative" and should be sold to better determine and allow for division of their value)). This would, of course, depend on the judge (i.e. accepting her argument), but judging from the cases I've read in law school and my peers, the climate in the legal community is like 10 to 1 leftist. (Even Bush's head lawyer in Florida was a Democrat.) Advice: kiss her ass and be sensitive on the gun thing until she's booted. Just approach it as a promise to yourself and him to give him an opportunity in the future to learn the ropes when he can take it to heart. The law recognizes 7 as an age where children begin to gain some legal mental capacity, followed my near adult mental capacity at age 12. Looking at those as a guage (albeit an arbitrary one), I would say you don't push her at all on introducing him to weps (even toy ones) until after age 7. Besides, he'll discover them on his own. Unfortunately by the time he's 18 all we'll have is grandfathered 870s anyway, and those will have to be stored in a 'central' range location, to be accessed only at designated times. So he'll probably have to go into the military to get any legal rifle training anyway. (P.S. I'm married 3 1/2 and my wife is damn stubborn so I do appreciate how hard it is to kiss a bitch's ass--albeit the condition is temporary in my wife's case.) Bitches, man, Bitches, MC
Link Posted: 6/26/2001 11:20:49 PM EDT
My advice is worth what you are paying for it. Let it go.. you got 9 years or so to deal with it.... Don't let this issue screw up your being a Dad to your son. You got 9 years to let the magazines, guns in the corner, ect. make their mark. You will win if you use what the BGs use against us. Incrementalism. You ever see a mother stand alone against a willful male adolsecent?.. It takes a team. There it is.
Link Posted: 6/27/2001 5:09:27 AM EDT
Boland, should it become an issue she brings up in court (DONT bring it up if she doesn't!) be prepared to show an extreme desire for firearms safety, have a high quality gunsafe installed if you dont already, show evedence of using trigger locks, even get formalized training from a reputable source (with proof), and get notorized statements from people stateing that you are a responsible, safe person, yadda yadda, with them, preferably from cop friends, clergy etc. Have all of this ready with documentation (photos, reciepts etc.). Keep all this as an ace up your sleeve, just dont show your hand till yuo have to. BrenLover
Link Posted: 6/27/2001 5:42:39 AM EDT
This is of major importance! Get all of your guns out of your house, now! If you must keep one or two, keep the one or two that you would least mind losing. She has a lawyer, I take it? It sounds like they are posturing to set you up for a reason to nail you with a restraining order, and chances are, any firearms in your home will be seized, if your state is anything like CT. Expect SWAT to serve the warrant, btw. You have guns. You are dangerous.
Link Posted: 6/27/2001 6:26:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/27/2001 6:52:31 AM EDT
Once again, a lot of measured and good advice. My .02-- Your son's exposure to guns will take care of itself and is currently a very very minor issue in your divorce. He may grow up to be a hairdresser who can't abide guns. I imagine, however, the more he is restricted from guns the more he will be interested in them. When I was growing up, my mother hated guns and tried to convince me that they weren't a good thing. This had absolutely no impact on me whatsoever, except possibly to sharpen my interest. Right now, you have to worry about 1) legally ensuring excellent access to your son, and trying not to diminish his relationship with you 2) Trying to not get screwed financially 3) Keeping a stiff upper lip and getting on with your life. 4) Dodging that UN emissary who is lurking in your closet. Get expert legal advice and good luck.
Link Posted: 6/27/2001 7:47:34 AM EDT
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