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Posted: 6/12/2001 7:51:26 PM EDT
[url]http://www.backwoodshome.com/columns/duffy010412.html[/url] There's something unsaid about the coming Timothy McVeigh execution, scheduled for May 16. Many of us can feel it but are afraid to express it for fear of being labeled a Timothy McVeigh sympathizer, or for fear of being charged with condoning the murder of 168 innocent people, including 19 children, even for fear of being targeted by our government as terrorists ourselves. What is unsaid can be inferred from the absence of Internet e-mail condemning McVeigh. In fact, it is the absence of much discussion at all about him. Sure, the mass media talks about him, and our government does, but we don't. When our federal government caused the deaths of 76 people at Waco, Texas, April 19, 1993, exactly two years before McVeigh struck, the Internet was aflood with heated chatter about how horrible and unjust our government was. And when the government acquitted its agents of all wrongdoing, and convicted the surviving Branch Davidians of minor offenses but sentenced them to 30 and 40-year prison terms anyway, there was Internet outrage once more. You could not download your e-mail or surf the web without being inundated with the outrage. Now that McVeigh is about to be executed on closed-circuit TV in the first federal execution in 38 years, there is relative silence on the Internet. Very little e-mail, very little discussion pro or con. Why is that? We can't quite put our finger on it, can we, or we dare not express the horror in our heart at the coming moment, and the implications for freedom in this country. Let's review what many of us feel: -- We accept the fact that Timothy McVeigh is a murderer and we sympathize with the victims' families. But we also understand that our government's agents killed 76 people at Waco, including 19 children, many of whom died agonizing deaths vomiting their stomachs out from the CS gas grenades lobbed into the building. We sympathize with those victims' families also. -- We accept the fact that Timothy McVeigh should pay with his life, but we cannot accept the fact that our government's agents got off scott free for Waco, and some were even promoted in its aftermath. -- We cannot accept the fact that the mainstream media remembers the victims of Oklahoma City, but is silent about the victims of Waco. You'd think no one died at Waco, or that there were no dead children there, or that there is no connection between the two events. -- We are outraged by the fact that McVeigh shows no remorse for the deaths of the 19 children at the Murrah Building, but we are also outraged that our government shows no remorse for the deaths of the 19 children at Waco. -- And no, we do not buy the government and mass media propaganda that the Waco victims chose their end by their lack of cooperation with the FBI agents, BATF agents, and the tanks that besieged their home. They were nutty members of a religious cult? So what! Since when is that a crime?
Link Posted: 6/12/2001 7:52:08 PM EDT
Cont Our government created McVeigh by its actions at Waco, just as it creates terrorists around the world by its "police" actions in various parts of the globe. Is it any wonder that one of these created terrorists, one among the millions of people who were outraged by Waco, felt unable to gain justice through the normal legal channels, and sought revenge by trying to get at the BATF agents housed on an upper floor of the Murrah Building? Blowing up the Murrah Building was a horrible act by McVeigh, for sure, but that is what terrorists do. Look around the world at what the Arabs have done in Israel, or what they did here in the U.S., in New York, in 1993, at the World Trade Center. We view them as criminals, but they view themselves as justice-seekers. Terrorism is a terrible thing, whether it's committed deliberately by a government against its citizens, or by an individual who strikes out in a blind rage. When the anniversary of Waco and the Murrah Building arrive April 19, I will mourn all the victims, both those of our government and those of Timothy McVeigh. And when May 16 arrives, and Timothy McVeigh is executed, I will be saddened that his will be the only justice delivered that day. May 16 will be a major turning point for America. We will all get to see the double standard in action, in all its horrific nakedness: the lone terrorist dies, while the government terrorists go free. We will be rid of McVeigh, but we will understand that far more powerful terrorists still lurk among us.
Link Posted: 6/12/2001 8:01:29 PM EDT
Well said. It's difficult to express such ideas even here without being labeled a sympathizer or told to go f*ck yourself. How sad. The entire string of events that culminated in the bombing and the bombing itself just breaks my heart.
Link Posted: 6/12/2001 8:04:30 PM EDT
I guess I'll be one of the first to admit I didn't want to see him killed. Unlike alot of internet rambos' that are on here claiming they would have killed him themselves. He went to war against and out of control government. he did what we all claim / wish / dream we could do. It seams to many people let the media circus instill what they want us to believe McViegh was. The only part of this that hurts me is the UNTIMELY DEATHS OF THOSE YOUNG CHILDREN. They had nothing to do with any of it.and will never grow up to make the choice of how our country should be run. Hell maybe one of them would have grew up to be President & over turn all these Unconstitutional Laws.
Link Posted: 6/12/2001 8:54:32 PM EDT
te]Originally Posted By NYshooter: I guess I'll be one of the first to admit I didn't want to see him killed. Unlike alot of internet rambos' that are on here claiming they would have killed him themselves. [/quote] I agree with RipMeyer, and your statement above. For the record, I am not a death penalty supporter. Studies indicate it does nothing to reduce crime.If it gave some comfort to the families of the victims of Oklahoma, then I guess I am happy(?) for them. Both Waco and Oklahoma are scars on American history. Nobody wins, everybody lost. We are a better country than this. But, this is probably the most violent society on Earth. We reward violence. We all have to look ourselves in the mirror and be held accountable for our actions- Us the people, and the people who we elect to represent us. Accountability: that is all I ask.We are not great because we say we are great.We have to show it. We have a ways to go.
Link Posted: 6/12/2001 9:03:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Boomer: Well said. It's difficult to express such ideas even here without being labeled a sympathizer or told to go f*ck yourself. How sad. The entire string of events that culminated in the bombing and the bombing itself just breaks my heart.
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You don't have to agree with his actions to believe in his cause. Hopefully we have not reached the point where actions like his are needed. Hopefully.[:(]
Link Posted: 6/13/2001 10:57:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Aggie1: You don't have to agree with his actions to believe in his cause.
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Thats a big part of the problem. People are afraid to believe what his cause is.
Link Posted: 6/13/2001 11:13:29 AM EDT
It's more than just believing in his cause. My biggest problem with McVeigh is his choice of targets. If he were interested in starting a personal war with the gov, why did he pick a building in the heartland of the country? If he really wanted to hurt the gov, hit them where THEY live, Wash, DC. The peons in the field might have been the ones to carry out the raids that have so angered us, but the leaders are the ones that we need to deal with. I will agree that as a military target, he did pick a correct one; however, from a TACTICAL standpoint of a resistence fighter, he chose very poorly due to the day care being present. If he had selected and bombed a target without killing innocents, a lot more people would been supporting his actions more openly. All around, one of the worst tragedies to befall our country[:(]
Link Posted: 6/13/2001 11:50:35 AM EDT
I also didn't want Tim McViegh put to death. I personally sympathize with his rationale about the govt being over bearing etc. There are so many unanswered questions. From now on, the answer to those questions will be mostly speculation.
Link Posted: 6/13/2001 2:54:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Mach1: For the record, I am not a death penalty supporter. Studies indicate it does nothing to reduce crime.
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It's not meant to reduce crime or act as a deterrent, it's a punishment, plain and simple. Given the recidivism rate one can also say that prison doesn't do anything to reduce crime, either. But, nobody suggests abolishing it.
Link Posted: 6/13/2001 3:07:25 PM EDT
Imagine what would could have happend in the USA had McVeigh not murdered the women and children of Ok City...at the time Mrs Clinton was on the rocks for travelgate and whitewater gate....her husband was looking at the ghosts of murdered children at Mena Arkansas...a list of crimes a mile long...and charges to boot ...suddenly Timmy McVeigh's insanity brings all that down..and the legitimate investegators of Waco and Ruby Ridge and Mena were virtually shut down by popular demand...militia members targeted..and the media has a field day with gun control in the light of domestic terrorism..the left loves violence it feeds off of it...and strangles freedom with it...McVeighs selfish desire for recognition without accomplishment ...fueled his evil desires...his after thoughts of justice or righting wrong or believing himself to be a white knight a lone avenger of the people...are just delusion...satan and Timothy McVeigh teamed up to put America under the reign of the socialists and nazis of the third way...and he set back the freedoms of decent hard working loyal citizens a hundred years and advanced the cause of the clintons and renos and the enemies of freedom and the very world government he in his delusion thought he was bringing down....
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